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Thread: Albums / Pieces of Music that Changed Your Life (classical and non-classical)

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    Senior Member Open Lane's Avatar
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    Default Albums / Pieces of Music that Changed Your Life (classical and non-classical)

    Hi. For me, there were a couple albums that really made me want to play and listen to music as much as possible. He's a list of music that changed my life, please share your own:

    Ozzy Osbourne - Randy Rhoads Tribute Live album and Diary of a Madman
    Shawn Lane - Powers of Ten Live
    Return to Forever - The Romantic Warrior
    Chick Corea Electric Band - Inside out
    Pink Floyd - Dark Side of The Moon (with headphones on)
    Chopin - Etudes
    Frank Zappa - Hot Rats
    Mingus - Let My Children Hear Music

    ALSO --- FORGOT THE MENTION THIS BUT HAD A HUGE IMPACT ON ME:

    Pat Martino - Live at Yoshi's
    Last edited by Open Lane; Nov-17-2015 at 18:41.

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    Moderator Art Rock's Avatar
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    Genesis - Selling England by the pound.

    The album that started me in prog and the first album to show me that albums could be much more than a combination of a few hit singles and other tracks.

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    All of them: they made me financially insecure, robbed me of my free time, caused weight gain and social isolation
    Last edited by brotagonist; Nov-17-2015 at 18:51. Reason: added :D

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    Senior Member GreenMamba's Avatar
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    At age 8 (I think) I went to a sleepover at an older friends house and we spent the night listening to The Beatles. Red and blue albums IIRC. I became a huge Beatle fan and Classic Rock fan in general, and went most of my childhood not listening to my generation's music.

    Age 17: A teacher mentioned persuasion in class, and a kid next to me said "Pretty Persuasion." I'd heard of the song and somewhat impulsively used this as an excuse to buy REM's Reckoning LP. I soon had a new favorite band and made an abrupt switch to college/alt rock that lasted into my mid 20s.

    Neither of these really changed my life though, other than my listening habits. I've never had One Big Moment with Classical Music.
    Last edited by GreenMamba; Nov-17-2015 at 19:06.

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    Senior Member Open Lane's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GreenMamba View Post
    At age 8 (I think) I went to a sleepover at an older friends house and we spent the night listening to The Beatles. Red and blue albums IIRC. I became a huge Beatle fan and Classic Rock fan in general, and went most of my childhood not listening to my generation's music.

    Age 17: A teacher mentioned persuasion in class, and a kid next to me said "Pretty Persuasion." I'd heard of the song and somewhat impulsively used this as an excuse to buy REM's Reckoning LP. I soon had a new favorite band and made an abrupt switch to college/alt rock that lasted into my mid 20s.

    Neither of these really changed my life though, other than my listening habits. I've never had One Big Moment with Classical Music.
    I'm the same way with classical. There hasn't really been one big moment that did it for me. It's a great form of music, and i have been listening to it a lot lately but i'm still kind of waiting to hear that one big moment. I said that chopin's etudes were a big moment for me, and they were - but mainly because they were some of the first classical music i listened to. Stuff like the Tribute album, romantic warrior, live at yoshi's, and powers of ten live gave me chills as if i had heard it before in a past life or something
    Last edited by Open Lane; Nov-17-2015 at 19:44.

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    Senior Member MJongo's Avatar
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    Meet The Residents. I have yet to find another work of music that comes even close to its emotional depth.

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    Senior Member techniquest's Avatar
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    "Tales from Topographic Oceans" by Yes. I first encountered this in the 6th form common room at school when I was 17 and it opened a whole new world of discovery and wonder that has never completely closed since.
    There may come a time when Youtube won't let us do this...

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    Senior Member elgars ghost's Avatar
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    First rock purchases included The Sensational Alex Harvey Band (The Impossible Dream), Deep Purple (24 Carat Purple), Led Zeppelin (IV), Yes (Relayer), Pink Floyd (Dark Side of the Moon), Status Quo (Live) and The Who (Meaty Beaty Big & Bouncy) and I still love them all to varying degrees.

    As regards classical, I knew that once I'd bought my first Beethoven, Bruckner and Mahler cds I'd want to take a real deep one from the well.
    '...a violator of his word, a libertine over head and ears in debt and disgrace, a despiser of domestic ties, the companion of gamblers and demireps, a man who has just closed half a century without a single claim on the gratitude of his country or the respect of posterity...' - Leigh Hunt on the Prince Regent (later George IV).

    ὃν οἱ θεοὶ φιλοῦσιν ἀποθνῄσκει νέος [Those whom the gods love die young] - Menander

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    Junior Member JohnTozer's Avatar
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    When I was in my mid teens (I am now 72) I heard Miles Davis "Kind of Blue".
    I chucked RocknRoll, Trad. New Orleans and swing and, like any young man, became obsessive. I also started reading Jack Karouac, and the beat poets and the existentialists. I have never looked back except that this 'water shed' in my life led me back to classical music again. This sort of music could coexist with Twentieth Century Classical music.

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    Senior Member Strange Magic's Avatar
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    While the general direction of my musical taste had been set in early childhood (classical--the Russians, mostly; and popular music--first, Jimmy Dorsey and his band and singers, then 1950s Tin Pan Alley), there were moments of true revelation to come. One of them was the discovery via an AM radio station of so-called "race music"--Blues, R&B, Doo-Wop. Songs like Earth Angel, Life is But a Dream, Bo Diddley, Ray Charles' early work all served to blow my mind, and I continue to enjoy all these genres.

    At roughly the same time, I became hooked on cante flamenco, the addiction cemented by the album Festival Gitana on Elektra. This had Sabicas, his brother Diego Castellon, and Mario Escudero as guitarists and two generally unheralded singers, Enrique Montoya and Domingo Alvarado. The force and influence of the renowned Sabicas compelled all concerned to create a unprecedented moment of flamenco utterance that firmly bound me to this compelling art form. Again, a lifelong enthusiasm.

    In classical, hearing recordings of Hovhaness' Lousadzak, Sibelius' En Saga and of Bartok's Concerto for Orchestra set me in new directions musically.

    In Rock, I've been influenced by Genesis: Selling England by the Pound; Soundgarden: Louder than Love; Jane's Addiction: Nothing's Shocking--actually I'll quit here, as this could go on indefinitely.
    Last edited by Strange Magic; Nov-24-2015 at 20:07.

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    Senior Member Dr Johnson's Avatar
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    Led Zeppelin II was the album that started it all for me.

    I was 13 when I bought it.

    There was no going back.

    With classical music there was no one album.
    Last edited by Dr Johnson; Nov-24-2015 at 20:13.
    'In our way, Johnson strongly expressed his love of driving fast in a post-chaise. "If (said he) I had no duties, and no reference to futurity, I would spend my life in driving briskly in a post-chaise with a pretty woman;"' Boswell's Life of Johnson.

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    Senior Member Strange Magic's Avatar
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    This
    Quote Originally Posted by Dr Johnson View Post
    Led Zeppelin II was the album that started it all for me.

    I was 13 when I bought it.

    There was no going back.
    Your taste was sure. Led Zeppelin's oeuvre, for me, represents a pinnacle, a Denali, an Aconcagua towering above other and lesser summits in Rock. The degree to which textures, timbres, instrumental juxtapositions are clearly enunciated and constantly altered in their work is extraordinary. Led Zeppelin I is one of a handful of albums that approach perfection, and is even more startling when one considers that it is a first effort. Ortega y Gasset, whom I have referenced before, penned this observation that I have always thought applied particularly to Led Zep:

    "In the great hour of the decline of the genre...the opportunity of achieving the perfect work is excellent...when accumulated experience has utterly refined the artistic sensitivity." From Notes on the Novel.

    I am happy that we share this respect for Led Zeppelin. They are our overlords.
    Last edited by Strange Magic; Nov-24-2015 at 23:17.

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    Senior Member MagneticGhost's Avatar
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    Genesis - Wind and Wuthering
    In particular One for the Vine. Huge influence on my developing taste in music. I was obsessed with Genesis subsequently for many teenage years.
    “Let us be grateful to the people who make us happy; they are the charming gardeners who make our souls blossom.”

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    Senior Member Simon Moon's Avatar
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    There were quite a few albums and pieces of music at various stages throughout my life, that altered it.

    When I was still a kid, it was Sargent Pepper's. It opened my mind to music other than the usual pop songs.

    In my early teens, it was probably the 1st Black Sabbath album.

    Then, very shortly after that, it was a pretty obscure album, "It Will All Work Out in Boomland" by a British band called T2. This album finished the job of opening my mind to new musical forms. This is often considered 'proto-prog', as it was so early, and still had many aspects of psychedelic music, but it also had many attributes that are associated with prog.

    Still listening to mostly hard rock (Sabbath, Purple, Uriah Heep, Zeppelin, etc), and this one outlier (T2), I discovered the rest of the prog world. At this point, I was no longer interested in the music I was currently listening to, and the exploration of prog ensued.

    These were the first few that I discovered:

    YES - Fragile
    King Crimson - Larks Tongue
    Camel - Mirage
    Genesis - Foxtrot
    Gentle Giant - In a Glass House

    These clued me into world class prog from other countries besides the UK and the US:

    PFM - Storia di un Minuto
    Banco - Io Sono Nato Libero

    Then I discovered the avante-prog bands of the time. Henry Cow, Art Zoyd, Universe Zero, Samla Mammas Manna, Stormy Six. I did not know it at the time, but these types of bands were the most responsible, after I listened to Stravinsky, for getting me into classical, since they are influenced by mid 20th century classical.

    The fusion of Return to Forever, Mahavishnu Orchestra, Brand X, Iceberg, Weather Report, Jean Luc Ponty changed my view on jazz.

    And finally, The Rite of Spring was the piece that opened the door to classical for me. Before that, all that I heard were the composers (Bach, Beethoven, Mozart, Hayden, Tchaikovsky, Brahms, etc) that are the favorites of most members here, but do nothing for me.

    Stravinsky lead me to Bartok, Webern, Berg, Schoenberg, Carter, Magnus Lindberg, Joan Tower, Schwantner, etc, etc and ever increasing need to discover more 20th century and contemporary music.
    Last edited by Simon Moon; Dec-02-2015 at 03:17.

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    Senior Member EarthBoundRules's Avatar
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    Beatles - Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Band
    Started my appreciation of rock / pop.

    Bob Dylan - Highway 61 Revisited
    Started my appreciation of lyrics.

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