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Thread: The Strange Magic of: Rush

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    Senior Member Strange Magic's Avatar
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    Default The Strange Magic of: Rush

    In 2013, the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, that extraordinarily erratic "decider" about Who is Important Enough, finally ended years of disgrace and scandal by inducting Rush, some 12 to 20 years after the trio had established the irrefutable necessity of their inclusion in the minds of the millions of their devotees. Certainly since 1974, Rush has offered uniquely cogent lyrics, amazing musicianship, and an electrifying stage presence that, decade after decade and album after album, has mesmerized its enormous following, including me--they indeed wield a Strange Magic. Here they are, Neil Peart, Alex Lifeson, and wizard-in-chief Geddy Lee, at the summit of their powers before an adoring audience and performing their classic Subdivisions.

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=6Ci_c77eQlk

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    Senior Member starthrower's Avatar
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    I'm glad Alex Lifeson let everybody know how seriously he takes the R&R Hall of Fame! Anyway, back in high school I used to listen to 2112, A Farewell To Kings, and Hemispheres. I lost interest after the early 80s, although their 1987 album Hold Your Fire contained many good songs. But that's the last one I listened to. The critics love to poke fun at them, but they are much better musicians than most rock bands could hope to be.

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    dogen
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    Quote Originally Posted by starthrower View Post
    I'm glad Alex Lifeson let everybody know how seriously he takes the R&R Hall of Fame! Anyway, back in high school I used to listen to 2112, A Farewell To Kings, and Hemispheres. I lost interest after the early 80s, although their 1987 album Hold Your Fire contained many good songs. But that's the last one I listened to. The critics love to poke fun at them, but they are much better musicians than most rock bands could hope to be.
    We seem to be in agreement. I saw them on the Hemispheres tour. Lost interest after that. They seemed to attempt what Yes tried to do, change to a more "contemporary" style, and in doing so also discarded much of what I liked about them.

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    Senior Member starthrower's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dogen View Post
    They seemed to attempt what Yes tried to do, change to a more "contemporary" style, and in doing so also discarded much of what I liked about them.
    I liked the sound that their old producer Tony Brown captured in the studio. A warm analog sound that breaths. In the 80s they went with that crappy freeze dried, bright crispy sound, which is very hard to sit and listen too. And like most bands that stay together too long, the music became less inspired and memorable.

    I had a chance to go see them when they came to town about five years ago, but I passed on it. I never did like big arena rock concerts. And I can't stand video screens.

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    Senior Member Strange Magic's Avatar
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    These responses again confirm my notion that I never grew up; I just got older. There is a wistful "lost youth" whiff of melancholia in such observations that I cannot discover in my own Peter Pan attitude toward the things I like. But I share in anyone's joy in such music, whether such pleasure is fresh and current or is a dying ember of nostalgia.
    Last edited by Strange Magic; Jan-10-2016 at 19:26.

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    Senior Member starthrower's Avatar
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    It's a matter of broader horizons and knowledge as one gets older. I still listen to many of these bands on occasion, but not as a regular diet. I just don't feel the urge to listen to a lot of rock music these days. I have other musical interests.

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    Senior Member elgars ghost's Avatar
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    After ditching the fantasy epics post-'Hemispheres' I thought Rush found an agreeable balance with 'Permanent Waves' and 'Moving Pictures', but from 'Signals' onwards they streamlined themselves for the 80s too much for my liking in the way that Yes and Genesis did. By the time of 'Grace Under Pressure' I knew I'd have to let the band go, but at least there was the comfort blanket of all the albums from 74-81, even the Led Zep-wannabe debut.
    '...a violator of his word, a libertine over head and ears in debt and disgrace, a despiser of domestic ties, the companion of gamblers and demireps, a man who has just closed half a century without a single claim on the gratitude of his country or the respect of posterity...' - Leigh Hunt on the Prince Regent (later George IV).

    ὃν οἱ θεοὶ φιλοῦσιν ἀποθνῄσκει νέος [Those whom the gods love die young] - Menander

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    Senior Member starthrower's Avatar
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    Signals has some great songs. New World Man, Digital Man, and Losing It are favorites. I didn't listen to it until '87, as I was into fusion in the early 80s.

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    Senior Member Strange Magic's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by elgars ghost View Post
    By the time of 'Grace Under Pressure' I knew I'd have to let the band go, but at least there was the comfort blanket of all the albums from 74-81, even the Led Zep-wannabe debut.
    Another example of the infinite variability of taste. Grace Under Pressure is a particular favorite of mine, showing in Distant Early Warning, Afterimage, Red Sector A and Between the Wheels a growing involvement in the importance of personal relationships and a growing awareness of vulnerability. I also relished the vigorous fearlessness expressed in The Enemy Within.

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    Senior Member elgars ghost's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Strange Magic View Post
    Another example of the infinite variability of taste. Grace Under Pressure is a particular favorite of mine, showing in Distant Early Warning, Afterimage, Red Sector A and Between the Wheels a growing involvement in the importance of personal relationships and a growing awareness of vulnerability. I also relished the vigorous fearlessness expressed in The Enemy Within.
    Yes, maybe I'd have been more receptive to their post-Moving Pictures output had I been exposed to it before the early stuff. I know they had to go down that road in order to carry on evolving but musically it sounded too clinical for me, unfortunately.
    '...a violator of his word, a libertine over head and ears in debt and disgrace, a despiser of domestic ties, the companion of gamblers and demireps, a man who has just closed half a century without a single claim on the gratitude of his country or the respect of posterity...' - Leigh Hunt on the Prince Regent (later George IV).

    ὃν οἱ θεοὶ φιλοῦσιν ἀποθνῄσκει νέος [Those whom the gods love die young] - Menander

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    Senior Member tdc's Avatar
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    Neil Peart is my favorite rock drummer, but aside from that they are not a band I'm that interested in. When I listen to their music I am mostly focused on listening to the drums. Moving Pictures is an excellent album though. My favorite Rush song is Red Barchetta.

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    Senior Member Biwa's Avatar
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    Great band! Too bad Getty's voice is going these days.
    Like most, though...I lost interest in them after Moving Pictures. Fortunately, Thrash and other Metal came along in the 80s to save the day and keep the "magic" fire burning...
    Hey! And even Ozzy came back...All aboard!!!

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    Senior Member Simon Moon's Avatar
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    I made substantial attempts to get into Rush at several points in their career, but to no avail. I have several friends with overlapping musical tastes, that did their best to get me into them on more than one occasion.

    Their music was not complex enough to scratch that itch for me. They were not good enough musicians to scratch that itch. They were just too mainstream for me, even at their most "progressive".

    I do have some respect for them for several reasons. Not least of which is, if not for Rush, there would most likely not be the very creative prog-metal scene, with all its varied sub-genres, going on today.

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    Senior Member Itullian's Avatar
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    Just can't get past the voice.
    When all else fails, listen to Thick as a Brick.

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    Senior Member Strange Magic's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Simon Moon View Post
    They were just too mainstream for me, even at their most "progressive".
    Rush, like anyone or anything, is not everybody's cup of tea. But could you amplify what your feelings are about the mainstream? If one likes or dislikes something, should its relationship to the mainstream be a factor? If so, to what extent? Itullian doesn't like Geddy Lee's voice; that I can understand immediately, but the mainstream thing--not clear to me.
    Last edited by Strange Magic; Jan-13-2016 at 22:03.

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