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Thread: Does an oboist need to carve his own reeds?

  1. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Saturnus View Post
    Professional oboe players either carve their own reeds or go to a professional reed maker - a good reed costs about 100$ and lasts for a month at best.
    professional oboists and bassoonists most always make their own reeds. many will make reeds for sale to students and amateur players, but believe me, they are NOT making any $100 per reed!!....We'd all retire at age 35!!

  2. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by CHERCHERY View Post
    Hi. I'm a new member here. I'm have already few months on playing flute but my first choice is actually an oboe. My question is where can I buy oboe cane? I want to make my own reed but I don't have the materials yet but I have the instrument. I always changing reeds every month. Pls. help. I'm from Philippines
    There are many, many 2ble reed shops in business, that have many sources of cane...the International Double Reed Society has full listings of advertisers, suppliers, shops in all of its regularly published journals:

    https://www.idrs.org/

  3. #18
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    professional oboists and bassoonists most all make their own reeds....it is an art form in itself, one that is constantly evolving, improving over one's entire professional career....it is such a personal, individual skill, so closely related to your artistic performance standards and practices that it's hard for me to imagine having someone else do it for you....

    There are so many parameters, so many criteria - pitch, tone, response, range, articulation, tone in particular keys or ranges ,etc, etc...I won't beat the topic to death - but, for example - you would probably not be using the same reed to play the opening to Tchaikovsky 6 [low register],, that you would use to play the opening of 'Le Sacre du Printemps" [high register]..the tone requirements needed for a Shostakovich symphony are going to be different from those required in a Mozart of Haydn symphony...

    you always need several good reeds working, then more good ones that are "playing in" [developing], and more that are still raw, recently manufactured blanks....it's a continuous process. consistency in manufacture is paramount - produce each reed with identical dimensions and measurements...however, even that will not produce entirely consistent results, because there is considerable variation in the quality of the individual pieces of cane.

  4. #19
    Senior Member Tikoo Tuba's Avatar
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    I think the oboist could grow the cane as a house plant .

  5. #20
    Senior Member Larkenfield's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nefigah View Post
    If so, how come?
    Most beginning oboists, if they are one, do not make their own reeds. They buy commercial reeds and get familiar with them, otherwise they would never know the difference between a reed they bought and a reed they made. It’s an art that requires you to have sufficient experience with the instrument in order to know how to do it well. But if the musician stays with the instrument long enough, it’s well worthwhile to make your own reeds to your own specifications with your choice of reed. Most woodwind players will tweak their reeds, including clarinet and sax players, with sandpaper or clippers or whatever to make them softer or harder or more playable. The more you play an instrument, the more you want control over it soundwise, and making your own reeds gives you the greatest opportunity. Expect to ruin a few as you’re making them, because oboe reeds are much more difficult to make than reeds for the sax or clarinet. But if someone is just starting out on the instrument, I would never worry about it in the beginning and stick with buying commercial reeds. I believe it’s just too advanced for a beginning student to make their own until after a few years of study.
    Last edited by Larkenfield; Dec-24-2018 at 09:36.
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  7. #21
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    All the oboists I've known make their own reeds. I knew a clarinet player or two who do also, but I'm not sure why.
    tomheimer.ampbk.com/

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