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Thread: Carl orff vocal music anyone? his second and third part of his trilogy

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    Senior Member deprofundis's Avatar
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    Default Carl orff vocal music anyone? his second and third part of his trilogy

    Since i rediscover Carl Orff and i love Carmina burana and vocal music i decided to order the sequel to his trilogy Catulli Carmina and trionfi del afrodite(if im correct in the spelling of the last one).

    Only 10 $ , heck a cd this cheap how can i go wrong, plus i need modern vocal work so Catulli Carmina and the other work is mostly entirely vocal music.. im dying to hear this.

    Carl orff is not overated he is just has great has Stravinsky, this is an opinion not an argument but this what i think, Because of Orff i started to like lieder and vocal music more...


    cheers Orff enthousiastic fan and remenber prog dude whiteout Orff they would ain't be Magma, these french prog godz own mutch to Orff for refference and influence
    Last edited by deprofundis; Feb-04-2016 at 01:25. Reason: i did a typos in the title

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    Senior Member elgars ghost's Avatar
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    I'm glad you've completed the triptych - although any of the three can stand alone (as Carmina Burana has resolutely proven at the undeserved expense of its siblings) I personally like to hear them one after the other. I would say that Catulli Carmina has more in common both musically and atmospherically with Carmina Burana than Trionfo di Afrodite does, and it also contains some fairly smutty lyrical content which you could imagine adorning the walls of some of Ancient Rome's more colourful streets. Whose version have you bought?

    If you like them then I would encourage you to also consider checking out Der Mondand Die Kluge, two works based on Germanic folk tales by the Brothers Grimm. Both works inhabit a rather different musical world to the Trionfi - the sparse, often percussion-driven instrumentation helping to uncannily compliment the rustic medieval elements of both tales.
    '...a violator of his word, a libertine over head and ears in debt and disgrace, a despiser of domestic ties, the companion of gamblers and demireps, a man who has just closed half a century without a single claim on the gratitude of his country or the respect of posterity...' - Leigh Hunt on the Prince Regent (later George IV).

    ὃν οἱ θεοὶ φιλοῦσιν ἀποθνῄσκει νέος [Those whom the gods love die young] - Menander

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    Senior Member deprofundis's Avatar
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    My copy on arts archives (label) i dont have the cd in hands the ensemble look germans or sound germans.

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    Senior Member elgars ghost's Avatar
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    I'm guessing that was the set conducted by Ferdinand Leitner - if so then I think it was well-received. You may well need the texts to get the best out of it, though - apparently they can be found online somewhere but I don't know in which languages they are available.
    '...a violator of his word, a libertine over head and ears in debt and disgrace, a despiser of domestic ties, the companion of gamblers and demireps, a man who has just closed half a century without a single claim on the gratitude of his country or the respect of posterity...' - Leigh Hunt on the Prince Regent (later George IV).

    ὃν οἱ θεοὶ φιλοῦσιν ἀποθνῄσκει νέος [Those whom the gods love die young] - Menander

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    Senior Member Lyricus's Avatar
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    One of the best pleasures of a youthful life is to read Catullus (especially in Latin) during the highest of highs and the lowest of lows of a relationship. That author has a special place in my heart. That said, I disagree with elgars ghost and say that Carmina Burana is definitely more pleasing to listen to than either the Carmina Catulli or Trionfo di Afrodite. Carmina Burana is great and deserves all the praise it gets.

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