View Poll Results: What is your favourite Puccini aria?

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  • Manon Lescaut - Donna non vidi mai

    3 10.71%
  • La Boheme - Si mi chiamano Mimi

    5 17.86%
  • La Boheme - Che gelida manina

    7 25.00%
  • La Boheme - Quando m'en vo

    6 21.43%
  • Tosca - Recondita armonia

    8 28.57%
  • Tosca - Vissi d'arte

    9 32.14%
  • Tosca - E lucevan le stelle

    10 35.71%
  • Madama Butterfly - Un bel di vedremo

    8 28.57%
  • La rondine - Chi'il bel sogno di doretta

    4 14.29%
  • Turandot - Nessun dorma

    14 50.00%
  • Other

    7 25.00%
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Thread: Your Favoruite Puccini Aria

  1. #1
    Senior Member Op.123's Avatar
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    Default Your Favoruite Puccini Aria

    Just curious as to what everyone's favourites are

    For me it's undoubtedly vissi d'arte and chi'il be sogno :P
    “Neither a lofty degree of intelligence nor imagination nor both together go to the making of genius. Love, love, love, that is the soul of genius.”

    - Mozart

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    Puccini is my favorite opera composer after Handel and Mozart, these three are three of the greatest opera composers.

    I voted several of those arias above. Turandot's famous aria piece has a special place in my list of great opera arias.

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  4. #3
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    I voted all aria's

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    I miss "In questa reggia."

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    Moderator Art Rock's Avatar
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    O mio babbino caro.

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  9. #6
    Senior Member Op.123's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Art Rock View Post
    O mio babbino caro.
    How... did... I...

    oh well, yep, that should certainly have been on the poll xD
    Last edited by Op.123; Feb-07-2016 at 12:55.
    “Neither a lofty degree of intelligence nor imagination nor both together go to the making of genius. Love, love, love, that is the soul of genius.”

    - Mozart

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  11. #7
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    I would have to go with Nessun Dorma, ESPECIALLY as recorded by Jussi Björling.
    Last edited by hpowders; Feb-07-2016 at 16:46.

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    Senior Member Diminuendo's Avatar
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    I love them all especially if they are sung by great singers like Callas or Di Stefano. I chose E lucevan le stelle because Di Stefano's interpretation of it is just perfection. And the aria in itself is so amazing. I think that Neil Kurtzman wrote it perfectly http://medicine-opera.com/2010/07/e-lucevan-le-stelle/:

    "The platinum standard for this aria was, without a doubt, set by Giuseppe Di Stefano (1921-2008). His singing has everything – beauty of tone, eloquent diction, passion, and dynamic shading that get’s every last ounce of the great song’s emotional content. And if all this weren’t enough he makes it all sound easy, just like Joe DiMaggio made playing baseball seem easy."

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VnU9oZju76A

    Puccini just doesn't get better than this. Except of course the whole 1953 recording of Tosca with Callas and Gobbi
    Last edited by Diminuendo; Feb-07-2016 at 20:51.
    "First I sing loud. When I start to run out of breath I sing softer" Giuseppe Di Stefano on his Faust high c diminuendo

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  14. #9
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    I have to say I'm quite surprised so many like E Lucevan le Stelle, I personally have never really been drawn to it xP

    Also, oddly enough I seem to prefer Callas's 1965 version... :P
    “Neither a lofty degree of intelligence nor imagination nor both together go to the making of genius. Love, love, love, that is the soul of genius.”

    - Mozart

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    Senior Member Diminuendo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Burroughs View Post
    I have to say I'm quite surprised so many like E Lucevan le Stelle, I personally have never really been drawn to it xP
    Well if Di Stefano's singing doesn't do it then you are a lost cause Some see the role of Cavaradossi as just a filler in the opera, but personally I just love the whole opera. I love Cavaradossi's interplay with Tosca in the first act, his heroic defiance in the second and his comforting of Tosca in the last act and of course his death for something he believes in. And the music the tenor gets to sing is just fantastic.
    "First I sing loud. When I start to run out of breath I sing softer" Giuseppe Di Stefano on his Faust high c diminuendo

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    Senior Member Diminuendo's Avatar
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    Well my last post got me thinking about it more and the opera should be renamed Cavaradossi. If we look at the libretto we can see that Sacristan thinks Cavaradossi has no respect for religion and "smells of the devil". And still the Sacristan brings him food. Then it would be reasonable to assume that higher church officials might have the same views. And still Cavaradossi is allowed to paint the church. Since Cavaradossi doesn't have much political power (the queen would rather pardon a corpse) he has to be one hell of a painter. When Cavaradossi meets Angelotti he decides to help him almost at once. He puts Angelotti at his house and gives him the food basket. Then of course is his relationship with Tosca which from the looks of it is a 24/7 job.

    Then in the second act he stands by with his beliefs even when his tortured. He immediately rejoices the future downfall of Scarpia when they hear that Bonaparte won. Then in the last act he forgives Tosca even though she screwed up everything and consoles her even though he knows that he is going to die. He knows Scarpia well enough to know that the execution will be real. Then in the end he dies with courage.

    Tosca on the other hand only spoils Cavaradossi's plans and gets him killed. Scarpias henchmen found Angelotti only because Tosca told them and went to the villa to look for another woman in the first place. Then she kills Scarpia. Not because she knows that Scarpia will never allow Cavaradossi to live. She does it because she can't take it anymore. I mean Scarpia had done nothing to her yet. Scarpia had tortured Cavaradossi almost to the death. Scarpia only asked Tosca to have sex with him once and that was too much for her. Why is Cavaradossi still with Tosca? I can understand why Callas didn't like Tosca as an opera and a character that much.

    Then there is Scarpia who succeeds in getting Angelotti only because Tosca is so easy to manipulate. He could guess that Cavaradossi helped Angelotti, but they would never have found Angelotti without Tosca's stupidity. Scarpia gets things done by manipulating people and by his position of power. He tried to get Cavaradossi to talk before the torture, but it didn't work. The biggest error that Scarpia did, which makes him quite stupid, is misreading Tosca. I mean that his whole plan depended on Tosca and he didn't think that if you push Tosca too much she would snap and kill him. I mean Tosca isn't the most stable person so it would be pretty easy to predict what was going to happen.

    I really think that Cavaradossi is the best character of the three. He knows what he does and stands by his beliefs even if it means death. His only mistake was being Tosca's lover. And perhaps rubbing it in Scarpia's nose at the end of the second act. But then of course he already knew he would die so it doesn't really make a difference in that regard.

    I really do love the whole opera and all the characters. And in the end I would like to apologize for going of the topic. I thought that this was an interesting view on the opera so I had to post it


    edit: In the libretto it says that the queen would just pardon a corpse meaning Cavaradossi would be dead before the pardon. So this is one of the reasons Cavaradossi is with Tosca. She obviously has friends in high places. Queen did send Scarpia to Rome and Cavaradossi is evidently against the royals and still the queen would pardon him for Tosca.
    Last edited by Diminuendo; Feb-08-2016 at 07:11. Reason: looked at the libretto some more
    "First I sing loud. When I start to run out of breath I sing softer" Giuseppe Di Stefano on his Faust high c diminuendo

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  20. #12
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    Give me this one for the tenor aria's any day off the week.

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    I love all of them, and a few more, of course.

    However, if pressed to choose only one, I would select "Mi chiamano Mimì". The creator of the role was the Italian soprano Cesira Ferrani, and she was recorded singing the aria in the early 20th century:

    Last edited by schigolch; Feb-08-2016 at 12:34.

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  23. #14
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    Puccini wrote lovely arias as a voice of late Romanticism.

  24. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Diminuendo View Post
    Well my last post got me thinking about it more and the opera should be renamed Cavaradossi. If we look at the libretto we can see that Sacristan thinks Cavaradossi has no respect for religion and "smells of the devil". And still the Sacristan brings him food. Then it would be reasonable to assume that higher church officials might have the same views. And still Cavaradossi is allowed to paint the church. Since Cavaradossi doesn't have much political power (the queen would rather pardon a corpse) he has to be one hell of a painter. When Cavaradossi meets Angelotti he decides to help him almost at once. He puts Angelotti at his house and gives him the food basket. Then of course is his relationship with Tosca which from the looks of it is a 24/7 job.

    Then in the second act he stands by with his beliefs even when his tortured. He immediately rejoices the future downfall of Scarpia when they hear that Bonaparte won. Then in the last act he forgives Tosca even though she screwed up everything and consoles her even though he knows that he is going to die. He knows Scarpia well enough to know that the execution will be real. Then in the end he dies with courage.

    Tosca on the other hand only spoils Cavaradossi's plans and gets him killed. Scarpias henchmen found Angelotti only because Tosca told them and went to the villa to look for another woman in the first place. Then she kills Scarpia. Not because she knows that Scarpia will never allow Cavaradossi to live. She does it because she can't take it anymore. I mean Scarpia had done nothing to her yet. Scarpia had tortured Cavaradossi almost to the death. Scarpia only asked Tosca to have sex with him once and that was too much for her. Why is Cavaradossi still with Tosca? I can understand why Callas didn't like Tosca as an opera and a character that much.

    Then there is Scarpia who succeeds in getting Angelotti only because Tosca is so easy to manipulate. He could guess that Cavaradossi helped Angelotti, but they would never have found Angelotti without Tosca's stupidity. Scarpia gets things done by manipulating people and by his position of power. He tried to get Cavaradossi to talk before the torture, but it didn't work. The biggest error that Scarpia did, which makes him quite stupid, is misreading Tosca. I mean that his whole plan depended on Tosca and he didn't think that if you push Tosca too much she would snap and kill him. I mean Tosca isn't the most stable person so it would be pretty easy to predict what was going to happen.

    I really think that Cavaradossi is the best character of the three. He knows what he does and stands by his beliefs even if it means death. His only mistake was being Tosca's lover. And perhaps rubbing it in Scarpia's nose at the end of the second act. But then of course he already knew he would die so it doesn't really make a difference in that regard.

    I really do love the whole opera and all the characters. And in the end I would like to apologize for going of the topic. I thought that this was an interesting view on the opera so I had to post it


    edit: In the libretto it says that the queen would just pardon a corpse meaning Cavaradossi would be dead before the pardon. So this is one of the reasons Cavaradossi is with Tosca. She obviously has friends in high places. Queen did send Scarpia to Rome and Cavaradossi is evidently against the royals and still the queen would pardon him for Tosca.
    Ah, I don't know, the play centers around her mostly, and I much prefer her character, no idea why though
    “Neither a lofty degree of intelligence nor imagination nor both together go to the making of genius. Love, love, love, that is the soul of genius.”

    - Mozart

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