View Poll Results: Picking your Favorite Bruckner Set(s) (Either Complete or Partial)

Voters
20. You may not vote on this poll
  • Herbert von Karajan and the Berlin Philharmonic (DG)

    9 45.00%
  • Eugen Jochum and the Berlin Philharmonic & Bavarian Radio Symphony (DG)

    5 25.00%
  • Eugen Jochum and the Dresden State Symphony (EMI)

    8 40.00%
  • Daniel Barenboim & the Chicago Symphony (DG)

    0 0%
  • Daniel Barenboim and the Berlin Philharmonic (Warner)

    2 10.00%
  • Simone Young and the Hamburg Philharmonic (Oehms)

    1 5.00%
  • Asahina Takashi & the Osaka Philharmonic Orchestra (Canyon)

    0 0%
  • George Tintner and the Royal Scottish National Orchestra (Naxos)

    1 5.00%
  • Stanislaw Skrowaczewski & the Rundfunk-Sinfonieorchester Saarbruecken (Oehms)

    2 10.00%
  • Gunther Wand & the Kolner Rundfunk Symphony Orchestra (Sony)

    4 20.00%
  • Sir Georg Solti and the Chicago Symphony (Decca)

    1 5.00%
  • Jasha Horenstein and the London Symphony, BBC Symphony, et al. (Various labels)

    0 0%
  • Riccardo Chailly & the Royal Concertgebouw & Deutsches Symphonie-Orchester Berlin (Decca)

    1 5.00%
  • Bernard Haitink and the Royal Concertgebouw (Philip)

    2 10.00%
  • Other(s)?

    4 20.00%
Multiple Choice Poll.
Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: Picking your Favorite Bruckner Set(s) (Either Complete or Partial)

  1. #1
    Senior Member Orfeo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Washington, DC area
    Posts
    2,138
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default Picking your Favorite Bruckner Set(s) (Either Complete or Partial)

    Continuing on where I left off from the similar thread on our favorite box sets of Mahler's symphonies, I now draw our attention on the Bruckner symphonies. Although, and perhaps regrettably so, Bruckner's symphonies are not as well recorded as Mahler's (perhaps because too much of a good thing is not necessarily a good thing as in the case of Mahler or Tchaikovsky), there are many very fine recordings of the symphonies to choose from, beginning with perhaps the earliest, Jascha Horenstein's 1928 recording with the Berlin Philharmonic. He did not get to record all of the symphonies, unfortunately, but he left behind a very admirable discographic legacy that will continue to have followers and attract newcomers. Jochum's milestone set with the Berlin Philharmonic and the Bavarian Radio (DG) is special for a number of reasons (even if one wonders why the switch from Hass editions to Novak's by the time he recorded this set, and the subsequent one with the Dresden State Symphony under EMI).

    The differences in editions are not deal-breakers (nor should they be, since they essentially affect only three of Bruckner's symphonies). I prefer Hass, although I can tolerate Novak providing that a performance is really good (Tennstedt and Welser-Most in the Eighth, Giulini in the Second come to mind). But for me, Hass' editings paint not only a more complete picture in the Bruckner symphonies, but they give us glimpses of Bruckner's original thoughts as he was writings these massive, complex works (before giving in to revisions).

    My favorite set is Karajan set (DG). Not only is his orchestra (the Berlin Philharmonic) consistently in top form, but as Richard Osborne states in Gramophone in his 1987 review, and which I totally concur, "it is Karajan who is best able to present a Bruckner symphony as a single vision." Not so many conductors could achieve that, though quite a few did (Wand, Giulini, Horenstein, to name a few). I, therefore, find it surprising, for example, that there are those who choose Jochum's EMI set over the much lauded Karajan DG set. Jochum's achievement in that set (as in the earlier one) is impressive as is the execution of his orchestra. But the tempi are at times ill-fitting for the massive scope of the symphonies (their take on the Eighth is a near disaster) and the brass verges towards crudity. Karajan has that uncanny ability to respond best to the structural and the personal in Bruckner (Wand is a close runner-up in that respect).

    But differences aside, please what say you.
    Last edited by Orfeo; Feb-08-2016 at 18:37.
    David A. Hollingsworth (dholling)

    ~All good art is about something deeper than it admits.
    Roger Ebert

  2. Likes Truckload liked this post
  3. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    18,933
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Bruckner is not one of my favorite composers but I know his music thoroughly and I do have some complete sets.

    I would vote for the Jochum/Dresden set as the finest overall, but this is not the way to collect all the Bruckner symphonies, if one wants superb performances of each symphony.

    For that, one will have to shell out more coin and collect individual performances of each symphony.

    For example, I have NEVER heard any performance of the revised Bruckner Third Symphony as great as the Karajan/BPO, but I wouldn't want his entire set to get it, because there are better individual performances to be had of the other Bruckner symphonies in that set

    Also, the Giulini/Vienna Philharmonic Bruckner Symphony No. 9 has never been equalled in any other performance found in a complete set. I would rather purchase this performance as a "single" than settle for a lesser performance of it in a set of all the symphonies.

    I would rather spend more for quality than save some money for convenience.
    Last edited by hpowders; Feb-09-2016 at 04:07.

  4. Likes Blancrocher liked this post
  5. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Nashville, Tennessee
    Posts
    15,621
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    If you're going for box sets of all of the symphonies, I have a soft spot for Tintner, because he introduced me to the composer. He also has a sense for the spiritual in the music. Jochum also conveys spirituality, though not to the degree of Tintner. I also selected Karajan, a solid set though not as spiritual.

    Honorable mention should go the Music & Arts Furtwangler remastering. It's not complete, but they did a bang-up job sonically with what they had to work with.

  6. #4
    Senior Member Gordontrek's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Heart of Dixie
    Posts
    598
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I will not make too many judgments because I have not heard enough Bruckner from enough conductors, but the Klemperer/Philharmonia recording of Bruckner 4 was astoundingly good. I've yet to listen to the complete sets of either Klemperer or Karajan, though.

  7. #5
    Senior Member Klassic's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Posts
    888
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by hpowders View Post
    Also, the Giulini/Vienna Philharmonic Bruckner Symphony No. 9 has never been equalled in any other performance.
    Giulini did do a very good job on a few of the Bruckner symphonies, I think perhaps, even better than Karajan.

  8. Likes elgars ghost liked this post
  9. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    38,640
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Daniel Barenboim and the Berlin Philharmonic (Warner)
    Sir George Solti and Bernard Haitink , he has the best orchestra of them all

  10. #7
    Senior Member elgars ghost's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Worcestershire, England
    Posts
    10,318
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Klassic View Post
    Giulini did do a very good job on a few of the Bruckner symphonies, I think perhaps, even better than Karajan.
    Giulini is excellent with the 2nd (Testament), 8th and 9th (DG) although I haven't heard his 7th (DG). I wonder what particularly attracted him to no.2? Even if we couldn't get a full cycle from him it's regrettable that he didn't have a tilt at the 5th at least.
    '...a violator of his word, a libertine over head and ears in debt and disgrace, a despiser of domestic ties, the companion of gamblers and demireps, a man who has just closed half a century without a single claim on the gratitude of his country or the respect of posterity...' - Leigh Hunt on the Prince Regent (later George IV).

    ὃν οἱ θεοὶ φιλοῦσιν ἀποθνῄσκει νέος [Those whom the gods love die young] - Menander

  11. Likes Orfeo liked this post
  12. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Posts
    336
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Why only one Asahina set? I believe the Canyon set you refer to is his '76-'78 set?

    There must be half a dozen Asahina complete sets! His individuals outing total that to a dizzying number. Truly, a maestro!

  13. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Posts
    336
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Pugg View Post
    Daniel Barenboim and the Berlin Philharmonic (Warner)
    Sir George Solti and Bernard Haitink , he has the best orchestra of them all
    Indeed, for who doesn't enjoy the LSO?

  14. #10
    Senior Member AClockworkOrange's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    England
    Posts
    2,465
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    From the list, I voted Karajan, Jochum (EMI), Young, Skrowaczewski and of course, Wand. I stand by each of these and regard them very highly.

    I neglected to click on Others however. So I would just add the following partial sets:

    Gunter Wand & the Berliner Philharmoniker - My introduction to Bruckner and still amongst my favourite recordings. That Wand did not conduct the Berliner's more frequently is a travesty.

    Sergiu Celibidache & the Munchner Philharmoniker - Alongside Wand, I adore Celibidache's Bruckner - especially with the Munchner Philharmoniker. I know this is a polarising set but what Celibidache draws musically is simply outstanding. There is always a sense of forward momentum and despite the timings suggesting otherwise, to me, it never feels drawn out.

    Klaus Tennstedt & the London Philharmonic Orchestra - He only recorded Symphonies 4, 7 & 8 with the LPO but they are such fantastic recordings. Tennstedt has such a wonderful grasp of the music and the LPO performs gloriously with great synergy for the Maestro.
    "Nietzsche said that life was a choice between suffering and boredom. He never said anything about having to put up with both at the same time."
    Humphrey Lyttelton

Similar Threads

  1. suggestions for Bruckner Complete Symphony set?
    By chalkpie in forum Recorded Music and Publications
    Replies: 38
    Last Post: Jan-29-2019, 23:46
  2. Picking out your favorite Kurt Atterberg Symphony(ies)
    By Orfeo in forum Classical Music Discussion Polls
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: Mar-23-2018, 18:30
  3. Picking your favorite Mahler Set(s) (either complete or close)
    By Orfeo in forum Classical Music Discussion Polls
    Replies: 51
    Last Post: Mar-15-2016, 07:41
  4. Picking Your Favorite Fifth Symphony(ies)
    By Orfeo in forum Classical Music Discussion Polls
    Replies: 32
    Last Post: Sep-16-2015, 14:12
  5. Picking Your Favorite British (or Anglo-British) Symphony(ies)
    By Orfeo in forum Classical Music Discussion Polls
    Replies: 29
    Last Post: Dec-15-2014, 14:22

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •