Page 1 of 10 12345 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 150

Thread: If You Could Only Save Five Conductors for Humanity?

  1. #1
    Senior Member StlukesguildOhio's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    7,496
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    9

    Default If You Could Only Save Five Conductors for Humanity?

    Riffing off the the thread, If You Could Only Save 5 Composers for Humanity? if you could only save the recorded oeuvre of 5 conductors, who would they be... and why?
    Inspiration exists, but it has to find you working.

    Art is never chaste. It ought to be forbidden to ignorant innocents, never allowed into contact with
    those not sufficiently prepared. Yes, art is dangerous. Where it is chaste, it is not art.

    Pablo Picasso

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    39,995
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Sir George Solti for his Wagner and Strauss , to start with.
    Riccardo Muti fur his also outstanding conducting like,Verdi's amongst all.
    Leonard Bernstein, love him or load him, excellent conducter.
    Herbert von Karajan, do I nee to say more?
    Richard Bonynge; the only one conductor who shook up the entire Bel canto repertoire with his beloved wife: Dame Joan Sutherland
    Last edited by Pugg; Feb-20-2016 at 06:55.

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Posts
    274
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Obviously Karajan, for Bruckner, Beethoven and Sibelius
    Bernstein, for Mahler (among others)
    Mravinsky, for all Russian music
    Solti
    Kubelik

  4. #4
    Senior Member Strange Magic's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Location
    Nova Caesarea
    Posts
    5,397
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    This may be--no, probably is--heresy, but over the decades Eugene Ormandy and the Philadelphia provided clear and non-idiosyncratic readings of just about everything that they recorded. Mind you, the recorded Columbia sound left much to be desired. I also favor Bernstein, Reiner, Boulez for his Bartok, and Dorati. That's 5, but Ormandy would be my all-around first choice.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Tsaraslondon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    7,159
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    2

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Pugg View Post
    Richard Bonynge; the only one conductor who shook up the entire Bel canto repertoire with his beloved wife: Dame Joan Sutherland
    Really? I think both Bonynge and his wife acknowledged the debt they owed to someone else, whose existence you continually try to ignore.
    "It's not enough to have a beautiful voice." Maria Callas

  6. Likes The Conte, Woodduck, Op.123 liked this post
  7. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Littlehampton, England, UK
    Posts
    1,440
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Claudio Abbado
    Charles Mackerrras
    Yevgeni Mravinsky
    Kurt Sanderling
    Osmo Vänskä

  8. #7
    Senior Member Tsaraslondon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    7,159
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    2

    Default

    Really tricky, because there are so many conductors I like in some repertory but not so much in others, but, if pressed, I'd go for.

    Herbert von Karajan (like him or hate him, his preeminence in post World War II music is unignorable, and the breadth of his repertoire was wide).
    Sir Colin Davis (for his championing of Berlioz, if nothing else)
    Yevgeni Mravinsky (for Russian repertoire)
    Sir John Barbirolli (I could never be without his Elgar)
    and, finally,
    Tullio Serafin (who first recognised and nurtured the genius that was Maria Callas).
    "It's not enough to have a beautiful voice." Maria Callas

  9. Likes Becca, Op.123 liked this post
  10. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    19,165
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Charles Munch.
    Leonard Bernstein.
    Eugene Ormandy.
    Sir Colin Davis.
    Arturo Toscanini.
    Otto Klemperer.

    Sorry. I could not limit it to only five.
    Last edited by hpowders; Feb-20-2016 at 14:49.

  11. Likes Strange Magic liked this post
  12. #9
    Senior Member Becca's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    San Diego, California
    Posts
    4,183
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by GregMitchell View Post
    Really tricky, because there are so many conductors I like in some repertory but not so much in others, but, if pressed, I'd go for.

    Herbert von Karajan (like him or hate him, his preeminence in post World War II music is unignorable, and the breadth of his repertoire was wide).
    Sir Colin Davis (for his championing of Berlioz, if nothing else)
    Yevgeni Mravinsky (for Russian repertoire)
    Sir John Barbirolli (I could never be without his Elgar)
    and, finally,
    Tullio Serafin (who first recognised and nurtured the genius that was Maria Callas).
    This comes the closest to my listen but I'd be loathe to be without Otto Klemperer but I'm not sure who I would squeeze out for him ... perhaps Mravinsky?

  13. Likes Tsaraslondon liked this post
  14. #10
    Senior Member Tsaraslondon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    7,159
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    2

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Becca View Post
    This comes the closest to my listen but I'd be loathe to be without Otto Klemperer but I'm not sure who I would squeeze out for him ... perhaps Mravinsky?
    It's a tough one. In terms of repertoire, Karajan has most of Klemperer's covered, so I'm sticking with Mravinsky.
    "It's not enough to have a beautiful voice." Maria Callas

  15. #11
    Senior Member isorhythm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    NYC
    Posts
    2,656
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Klemperer (duh)
    Karajan (for his first Beethoven and some other stuff)
    Bernstein (for Mahler and various Americans)
    Boulez (for everything)
    Herreweghe (for Baroque)

  16. Likes shangoyal, RogerWaters liked this post
  17. #12
    Senior Member elgars ghost's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Worcestershire, England
    Posts
    9,504
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Benjamin Britten - I can't be without Britten's operas and the man himself recorded most of them of which the results are often considered definitive.

    Bernstein - did the Mahler cycle not once but twice and managed great things in both, and then there are the recordings of his own works and those of other American composers.

    Latham-König- unsung, but did a much-needed series of Weill's German stage works for Capriccio label and earns extra points for being the only conductor to record Hindemith's brilliant opera Neues vom Tage.

    Gergiev - his orchestral recordings divide opinion but the series of recordings his did on Philips with the Kirov did Russian opera (and those of Rimsky-Korsakov and Prokofiev in particular) a great service.

    Boulez - not just the recordings of much of his own work but those of Berg/Schoenberg/Webern/Stravinsky/Messiaen etc.
    '...a violator of his word, a libertine over head and ears in debt and disgrace, a despiser of domestic ties, the companion of gamblers and demireps, a man who has just closed half a century without a single claim on the gratitude of his country or the respect of posterity...' - Leigh Hunt on the Prince Regent (later George IV).

    ὃν οἱ θεοὶ φιλοῦσιν ἀποθνῄσκει νέος [Those whom the gods love die young] - Menander

  18. Likes EddieRUKiddingVarese liked this post
  19. #13
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Posts
    597
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Solti
    Karajan
    Mravkinsky
    Gardiner

    The last one is a tough one. Kubelik, Bernstein, and Haitink are all right there for various composers that I like them for. But since Kubelik is my favorite among those 3 for Mahler and I'm not so much a Solti/Mahler fan, I will say him.

  20. #14
    Senior Member ArtMusic's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    6,559
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Christopher Hogwood
    Alan Curtis
    Masaaki Suzuki
    Rene Jacobs
    John Eliot Gardiner

    They are/were great conductors and scholars of my favorite composers. Pure and simple.

  21. Likes JosefinaHW liked this post
  22. #15
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Posts
    2,354
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Toscanini
    Furtwangler
    Haitinck
    Barbirolli
    ?

Page 1 of 10 12345 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Does Humanity Benefit from Classical Music?
    By Truckload in forum Classical Music Discussion
    Replies: 121
    Last Post: May-22-2016, 09:18
  2. What classical piece represents humanity?
    By Declined in forum Classical Music Discussion
    Replies: 203
    Last Post: Mar-21-2016, 11:32
  3. If You Could Only Save 5 Composers for Humanity?
    By Klassic in forum Classical Music Discussion
    Replies: 84
    Last Post: Feb-20-2016, 02:57
  4. The solution to al ofl humanity's woes!
    By Ukko in forum Community Forum
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: Sep-06-2015, 14:58
  5. Is there any special value to humanity in art music?
    By Truckload in forum Classical Music Discussion
    Replies: 39
    Last Post: Feb-06-2013, 09:39

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •