Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: How it is called when someone plays notes a little bit delayed to accompaniment

  1. #1
    Newbies
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    4
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default How it is called when someone plays notes a little bit delayed to accompaniment

    Here is an example: Camille Saint-Saëns, Le cygne (The Swan).
    I am not sure if I describe it correctly, but I hear it like the player on the cello is playing notes not exactly on the beats as it is in music score. Or other way said, if we take accompaniment piano player as a reference than cello delays, say about a half of a note played by piano.

    Is it like that, or I am hearing it wrong?
    Or is it like that the cello player is playing on the beat, but it is characteristic of cello, that it sounds as delayed?

    Thank you for explanations.

  2. #2
    New Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Posts
    2
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I have heard this referred to by pianists as "breaking the hands."

  3. #3
    Senior Member Bevo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Posts
    221
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Don't know if this is 100% accurate, but this might just simply be syncopation. Notes played/stressed on beats you wouldn't normally think. Given the time is 6/4 instead of 6/8 it should be a little easier to analyze what's going on due to larger note values. Best of luck

  4. #4
    Senior Member norman bates's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    4,071
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    It's called rubato or tempo rubato and it's a way to play used a lot (often overused I'm tempted to say) in romantic music to make the music more expressive. And sometimes to hide technical deficiencies.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tempo_rubato
    Last edited by norman bates; Jun-12-2016 at 23:55.
    What time is the next swan?

  5. #5
    Senior Member Rhombic's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    University of York, UK
    Posts
    307
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by norman bates View Post
    It's called rubato or tempo rubato and it's a way to play used a lot (often overused I'm tempted to say) in romantic music to make the music more expressive. And sometimes to hide technical deficiencies.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tempo_rubato
    This would not result in a systematic delay for one of the instruments. Rubato implies a general freedom with regards to tempo as a whole, not with an ad lib one for each player.
    Someday, something will come out of anything.

  6. Likes Samuel Kristopher liked this post
  7. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Wales
    Posts
    1,725
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Is "roboto" the electronic equivalent of rubato? Best check this out:



    The amazing Clara Rockmore and her theremin.

  8. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    39,987
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ttw View Post
    I have heard this referred to by pianists as "breaking the hands."
    Who was this wonder pianist?

Similar Threads

  1. a classical with a vocal accompaniment
    By yerbed in forum Solved Cases (archive)
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: Aug-22-2015, 14:39
  2. If anybody could help me out with piano Accompaniment...
    By catherinethegreat21 in forum Keyboard Instruments
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: May-26-2015, 04:28
  3. Replies: 33
    Last Post: Dec-26-2014, 06:36
  4. Question on writing accompaniment
    By Piwikiwi in forum Today's Composers
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: Nov-04-2014, 01:32
  5. Replies: 3
    Last Post: Jun-12-2013, 22:20

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •