Results 1 to 11 of 11

Thread: a history of vinyl LP

  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Auckland New Zealand
    Posts
    127
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default a history of vinyl LP

    LP Vinyl

    In November 1957 the first stereo two-channel records were issued – by Audio Fidelity in the USA and Pye in Britain, using the Westrex "45/45" single-groove system. Invented by Alan Blumlein of EMI in 1931 and patented the same year. EMI cut the first stereo test discs using the system in 1933. However it was not exploited commercially until a quarter of a century later.

    In 1954 RCA records began their Living Stereo three microphone recording program, first on 2 Track Reel to Reel tapes and by 1959 finally on Stereo LPs.

    In 1961, Mercury enhanced their "Mercury Living Presence" technique with three-microphone stereo recordings using 35mm magnetic film instead of half-inch tape for recording. The greater thickness and width of 35mm magnetic film prevented tape layer print-through and pre-echo and gained in addition extended frequency range and transient response.

    In the late 1970s, "Direct-to-Disc" records were produced, aimed at audiophiles, which completely bypassed the use of magnetic tape in favor of a "purist" transcription directly to the master lacquer disc. Also during this period, "Half-Speed Mastered" LPs from "Original Master" tapes were released, using expensive state-of-the-art technology.

    The early 1980s saw the introduction of "DBX-encoded" records, again for the audiophile niche market. These were completely incompatible with standard record playback preamplifiers, relying on a sophisticated DBX noise reduction encoding/decoding scheme to virtually eliminate playback noise and increase dynamic range. A similar and very short-lived scheme involved using the CBS developed "CX" noise reduction encoding/decoding scheme.

    Also in the late 1970s and 1980s, a method to improve the dynamic range of mass-produced records involved highly advanced disc cutting equipment. These techniques, marketed as the CBS Discomputer and Teldec Direct Metal Mastering, were used to reduce inner-groove distortion. Many listeners reported while the LPs had lower surface noise that the sound quality of Direct Metal
    Mastering was on the "cold" side.

    In the mid 1990’s new-release Analog LPs were reborn, lead by Classic Records soon followed by many other audiophile companies. According to both hardware and software manufacturers 2005 was the best year for Analog LPs and Turntable sales in over a decade.

  2. #2
    Senior Member Mark Harwood's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Isle of Arran, Scotland.
    Posts
    284
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Interesting stuff, but analog recording seems to be history now. Surface noise and long-term deterioration are factors that might have been sorted out, but they weren't.
    Perhaps some day there will be computers and related devices that operate in an analog manner. Until then, digital will be the way forward, and I am grateful that I live in the CD age.
    "Music is a social act of communication among people, a gesture of friendship, the strongest there is."
    - Malcolm Arnold.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Ciel_Rouge's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Szczecin, Poland
    Posts
    231
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Hi bongos, Mark Harwood - we've had a similar thread here:

    The vinyl empire strikes back?

  4. #4
    Senior Member EddieRUKiddingVarese's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Father of Electronic muse
    Posts
    5,419
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    17

    Default

    Vinyl forever.........................
    "Everyone is born with genius, but most people only keep it a few minutes"

  5. Likes joen_cph, Don Fatale liked this post
  6. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Hollywood U.S.A.
    Posts
    5,883
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    I'm most interested in the early Columbia "coarse groove" LPs. I only have a few of them, but they have a unique appearance and they sound very good. I wonder if any of the recordings released this way have not yet been released by Sony.
    Last edited by bigshot; Jun-29-2018 at 17:27.

  7. Likes EddieRUKiddingVarese liked this post
  8. #6
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Posts
    15
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Thanks bongos!

    I had no idea the history of the LP was so... turbulent. Or that it started so late in the game (1957!).

    Cheers,
    zoot

  9. #7
    Senior Member Baron Scarpia's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Location
    Texas, USA
    Posts
    1,710
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by zootMutant View Post
    Thanks bongos!

    I had no idea the history of the LP was so... turbulent. Or that it started so late in the game (1957!).

    Cheers,
    zoot
    The first commercial mono LPs were released by Columbia in 1948.

    There is a decent wikipedia page on the history of the LP.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LP_record

  10. Likes EddieRUKiddingVarese, joen_cph liked this post
  11. #8
    Senior Member Baron Scarpia's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Location
    Texas, USA
    Posts
    1,710
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bigshot View Post
    I'm most interested in the early Columbia "coarse groove" LPs. I only have a few of them, but they have a unique appearance and they sound very good. I wonder if any of the recordings released this way have not yet been released by Sony.
    That's one thing not addressed in the Wiki page. The early LPs had a coarser groove than later ones, presumably corresponding to improved technology in cutting heads, pickups and diamond styluses. But I don't know if this corresponded to an explicit change in the technical specifications of the LP.

    My father had a turntable with the very first stereo pickup cartridge, the Shure M3D. It sounded good, but required a high tracking force.

  12. Likes EddieRUKiddingVarese liked this post
  13. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Hollywood U.S.A.
    Posts
    5,883
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    Columbia had been recording to 33 1/3 masters as early as WW2. They recorded to large discs and each take was a separate band on the master. They would be dubbed to standard 78s for release.

  14. Likes EddieRUKiddingVarese, joen_cph liked this post
  15. #10
    Senior Member geralmar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    466
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Until RIAA equalization became the industry standard in 1954, there were numerous recording/playback curves and each label chose its own equalization standard. It's of interest to me because I recently bought an old Mercury L.P. and a note on the back of the jacket states the AES equalization curve was used. Old amplifier controls used to include an equalization selector. I'm curious about what I'll lose when I play my Mercury L.P. with the wrong equalization.

    P.S. I always thought it interesting that the L.P. was designed to accommodate Beethoven's Eroica Symphony (50 minutes) while the CD was designed to accommodate Beethoven's Choral Symphony (75 minutes). Of course longer playing times can be found in each medium; but the standards dictated the size of each platter.
    Last edited by geralmar; Oct-27-2018 at 06:01.

  16. #11
    Senior Member KenOC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    SoCal, USA
    Posts
    20,115
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Still another equalization curve was required for tape. I used to have a Sony reel-to-reel deck with tape head output that required a matching preamp with the proper curve. The signal level was so low that hum was always a problem. But the input preamp with the magic eye VU indicators was a gas!

    "NAB curve" sticks in my mind. Does anybody know?

    Checked. Answer is yes. https://www.diamondcut.com/vforum/fo...playback-curve
    Last edited by KenOC; Oct-27-2018 at 06:01.


  17. Likes EddieRUKiddingVarese liked this post

Similar Threads

  1. The vinyl empire strikes back?
    By Ciel_Rouge in forum Community Forum
    Replies: 34
    Last Post: Jul-23-2011, 02:45
  2. An Oral History of Australian Composition: Comment
    By RonPrice in forum Classical Music Discussion
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: Feb-02-2011, 01:21
  3. Classical music history podcast
    By alfabeta in forum Classical Music Discussion
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: Jan-08-2009, 13:07
  4. Books on Classical Music History
    By WalterJ in forum Beginners
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: Dec-25-2007, 00:43
  5. I'm not a musician!
    By orquesta tipica in forum Classical Music Discussion
    Replies: 45
    Last Post: Feb-06-2007, 09:58

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •