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Thread: Niccolo Paganini

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    Senior Member jurianbai's Avatar
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    Default Niccolo Paganini

    Why no thread on this interesting character.

    Was he more just a virtuoso violinist who happen to compose or he was more a composer ? his works been admired by Listz and Rachmaninoff. He also believe to make impact on violin composing. Also myth on how he sacrificed his soul to darkforce to achieved his violin greatness, over rated or true , based on his works?

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    Senior Member World Violist's Avatar
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    I have never been interested in Paganini's works. There is rarely any substance to speak of in his works. It's so flashy and technical, I've no doubt it appeals to some people, but other than that I see little in the way of redeeming properties for this fellow. I see him as a violinist who tried to compose.

    No doubt, though, he made violin playing what it is today. Absolutely. I mean, you look at the 24th violin caprice and it's basically a handbook on basic virtuoso techniques you have to have perfectly at your disposal to get anywhere professionally on the violin. Alas, that's what I meant by his music having such little content. There is no emotion in it; it is just showing off. Those skills required in Paganini's music would be better employed in about any other big-name violin concerto ever written, since many of the techniques are undoubtedly used in each of those concerti (and several others).
    You get a frog in your throat, you sound hoarse.

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    Senior Member jurianbai's Avatar
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    i find it's true that Paganini works are more concentrated on technic. maybe this is the reason why it's attract many other composers to re arrange it with new harmonization.

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    Senior Member World Violist's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jurianbai View Post
    i find it's true that Paganini works are more concentrated on technic. maybe this is the reason why it's attract many other composers to re arrange it with new harmonization.
    Yes, that and some of the tunes are quite attractive; the most famous one for re-harmonization/re-orchestration is the 24th caprice, and that's a neat melody that's very versatile indeed.
    You get a frog in your throat, you sound hoarse.

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    Senior Member Taneyev's Avatar
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    You should leave his concertos and caprices, and investigate his chamber works; the lovely short sonatas for violin and guitar, his quartets with guitar, his 3 string conventional quartets, the "grand viola" sonata,etc. IMHO, he was one of the best italian melodist of all time. If you like pure and "bel canto" italian melodies, you have it with him.

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    Senior Member jurianbai's Avatar
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    For chamber I got his Guitar quartet no.7 & 14, still show virtuoso on guitar playing and I have the string quartet version on these also by the Stuvesant quartet. Also got his Great sonata for guitar and violin romanze, and Great sonata for gustare and violin.

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    What about his guitar sonata? Great too!
    One of the genious composers. Not to mention his violin concertos(both of the concertos are great!).

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    Senior Member Rachovsky's Avatar
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    Currently listening to his "Maestosa Sonata Sentimentale" ('Variations on the Austrian National Hymn') under Dutoit/LPO. It's a pretty good piece..


    Music is the one incorporeal entrance into the higher world of knowledge which comprehends mankind but which mankind cannot comprehend. -- Beethoven

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    It's been some time since I explored his violin concertos and I still can't get enough of them. Especially No. 1. I can't understand how people can say that his music is one big virtuoso showboat. Maybe caprices, but concertos, sonatas?

    The only thing about him that I dislike is too much cymbals in orchestral parts. I guess it's a fruit of his fascination for Berlioz.

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    Senior Member SenorTearduct's Avatar
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    I find that Paganini's flaw did not lie in his inept ability to compose with emotion (I think he was brillent with the expression) but rather that most people cannot find the connection to the expressed emotion because the tempo and speed of his works are so insane the emotional content is a commenly failed connection replaced by a sense of complication.

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    Senior Member Taneyev's Avatar
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    IMHO, it's not the speed of the tempo of his works, but the speed on with almost averybody plays his works.
    The majority of his Caprices, for example, are marked on a moderate tempo, but everybody plays them as they
    want to break a record. And playing allegro molto, or presto, there's no time for emotions.

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    Senior Member SenorTearduct's Avatar
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    I see, and i agree with the exception that I do believe that even in high tempos like a work played in a common presto tempo, emotions can be and are expressed, look at Mozart's symphony no. 22 or his k522- A Musical Joke, or his concerto in Bb Kv 207. All of which display emotion, however trival or brisk, or happy

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    Senior Member SenorTearduct's Avatar
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    what is IMHO?
    “Music, even in situations of the greatest horror, should never be painful to the ear but should flatter and charm it, and thereby always remain music.”
    - Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

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    Administrator Krummhorn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SenorTearduct View Post
    what is IMHO?
    An acronym for: In My Humble Opinion

    Kh
    Administrator


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    Senior Member SenorTearduct's Avatar
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    well I will be adapting that phrase
    “Music, even in situations of the greatest horror, should never be painful to the ear but should flatter and charm it, and thereby always remain music.”
    - Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

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