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Thread: Requiem for the Living

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    Default Requiem for the Living

    One of the most interesting modern composers alive today is Dan Forrest. A few months ago, my friend sang in the Requiem for the Living by Dan Forrest.

    The first 8 measures of this work is silent and there is a lot of musical imagery and symbolism. This work, was the subject of a University of Tennessee Master Thesis. which describes this imagery in far more detail.

    The Requiem was based on motives, most notably the motive descending a minor third. Motive A, a primary component of the composition, was found throughout the entire work in various forms. Schenkerian Analysis assisted in revealing how these forms of the motives took the shape of the original motive in three ways: by the interpolation of pitches (including infrapolation and ultrapolation), retrograde, and/or transposition. Three rhythmic motives were also present in Forrest’s Requiem and assisted in building the momentum within the movements.
    Here is the video of the River Tree Singer's performance of it.



    Would you consider this to be classical or non-classical because it is modern?

    *Note to mods: I am new here so I apologize if this is in the wrong forum category. I searched the forums before posting and don't see any other posts about this work, which is why I included it here.

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    Quote Originally Posted by davidpneff View Post
    One of the most interesting modern composers alive today is Dan Forrest. A few months ago, my friend sang in the Requiem for the Living by Dan Forrest.

    The first 8 measures of this work is silent and there is a lot of musical imagery and symbolism. This work, was the subject of a University of Tennessee Master Thesis. which describes this imagery in far more detail.



    Here is the video of the River Tree Singer's performance of it.


    Would you consider this to be classical or non-classical because it is modern?

    *Note to mods: I am new here so I apologize if this is in the wrong forum category. I searched the forums before posting and don't see any other posts about this work, which is why I included it here.
    I do like it and it sounds very classical .

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    Senior Member Metairie Road's Avatar
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    The quote from the thesis was all Greek to me. I Listened to it anyway.

    Enjoyed it immensely, thanks for posting it.

    Would you consider this to be classical or non-classical because it is modern?
    Certainly classical, I mean; just look at all those fiddles and the guy waving a stick around, a dead giveaway that you're listening to classical music.

    Best wishes
    Metairie Road
    Last edited by Metairie Road; Aug-11-2016 at 09:10.

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