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Thread: Learning a new instrument in order to...?

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    Default Learning a new instrument in order to...?

    Okay, I was planning to study classical music. In order to do so, do I need to learn at least a new instrument, such as piano? I currently play some guitar (not reading actual music, but just rock and metal stuff). I guess there's a lot of music reading in classical music, so does one need to learn at least piano to study classical music well?

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    No, but it can be very useful.

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    Senior Member nickgray's Avatar
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    It depends on what you wanna do, I guess. If you wanna compose you need to learn composition, harmony, all that scary theoretical stuff. I don't see why you need to learn something other than guitar (obviously you gonna need some knowledge of other instruments, but you don't have to be able to play them) if you're interested in writing music. If you're interested just in playing piano - learn how to play piano, violin - learn violin, etc. I didn't really understand your question, to be honest Just... grab some musical theory book if you're interested in all that stuff, that should do it.
    Mundus vult decipi, ergo decipiatur.

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    Quote Originally Posted by nickgray View Post
    Just... grab some musical theory book
    Don't do this! The book will bore you to death and you'll be back to your heavy metal before you can spell Mozart.

    If you have interest in classical music read one of the dozens of threads created here by newcomers asking for repertoire guidance: ear friendly and introductory musical compositions. Skip the books.

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    Senior Member Edward Elgar's Avatar
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    If you want to study the history of music, get a history book. If you want to study analysis, get an analysis book. If you want to study composition, get a composition book. If you want to study performance, get any instrument and a beginner's book. The essensials though are a good CD/MP3 player, good headphones and an open mind.
    When all the paint has been dried, when all the stone has been carved, music shall remain, and we shall work with what remains.

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    Senior Member handlebar's Avatar
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    Isaac Stern once said that "learning about music through books is like making love by mail" or something to that effect. While I agree that books can be tremendously enriching and informative, they only really help with information,not emotion and power. Find a teacher or local college with either a music appreciation class or take lessons from someone,even if they only last a year or so. The insight from a good teacher will last your lifetime.
    I was in your shoes once and took the plunge to visit a piano teacher and violin teacher. The violin didn't last near as long but those piano classes mad all the difference in the world as he taught me so much more in the ways of harmony,theory and composition. I had also been in brass ensembles before then but played by ear,not sight. After the education from the piano teacher, I could read music,compose and even follow scores after a few months. Now, 25 years + onwards i thank my teacher for his insight and the role it has played in my life.

    It might seem boring, but reading orchestral scores is tremendous fun and really advances the knowledge of a music piece aside from just listening.

    Just my thoughts mind you.

    Jim

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    Okay. Thanks for all the replies!

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    Quote Originally Posted by jhooper3581 View Post
    Okay, I was planning to study classical music. In order to do so, do I need to learn at least a new instrument, such as piano? I currently play some guitar (not reading actual music, but just rock and metal stuff). I guess there's a lot of music reading in classical music, so does one need to learn at least piano to study classical music well?
    Here are a few things to consider:

    1. If you really want to play an instrument. Decide what instrument you like the best or have the most interest in learning. My instrument is guitar because I love the instrument, but I also learned a lot about piano.

    2. I would advise you to get a good teacher. Perhaps a teacher who could teach you music theory, which encompasses years of study, perhaps even lifetime in some cases, but learning music theory will open up many doors for you creatively. You will learn how to read and write music, you will learn how to have a musical conversation with somebody, like for example, telling somebody what key a piece of music is in, and it will also help you get all kinds of work. Not just classical work, but perhaps television, movies, etc, that is, if these other fields interests you.

    3. Learning an instrument and being proficient at it will also open up many doors for you creatively and landing a gig with other musicians, composers, producers, etc. You learn a lot when you're on the bandstand with other musicians playing in front of a large audience. I had to do this many, many times, but I always get some kind of thrill out of it after I get warmed up to the crowds.

    Hopefully these three points will help you in some way. Good luck.

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    Senior Member nefigah's Avatar
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    I believe learning an instrument and the theory etc. that comes with it can be quite helpful in enhancing your enjoyment of classical music.

    You can of course pick whatever instrument you like (especially if you're young), but the piano is always a great starting instrument: I think even if you go on to other instruments, your time with a piano is not wasted.

    I second the idea of finding a teacher.

  10. #10
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    I think you need that one, in fact you can apply what you've learn not only in playing classical music. most of the singers has this talent in playing instrument. I think now is the right time for you to get started.

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