Page 4 of 10 FirstFirst 12345678 ... LastLast
Results 46 to 60 of 147

Thread: Beethoven late sonatas-- Your favorite interpreters

  1. #46
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Ann Arbor, Michigan
    Posts
    610
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    As stated in the original post, I'm not a fan of the Hammerklavier. But after seeing so many of you guys recommended Annie Fischer, I listened to her and I'm stunned. The Andante Sostenuto and the final fugue are unbearably intense.

  2. Likes AfterHours, Pugg, Bettina and 1 others liked this post
  3. #47
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    5,901
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    2

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AfterHours View Post
    Thank you, I checked those out and my favorite among them was Demus, which I'd heard before but was well worth returning to. Afanassiev and Levy were exceptional too (which I hadn't heard before). Unfortunately, I couldn't find Zhukov's Op 110 on YouTube or Spotify to be able to check it out, but I trust, based on these others, that it is great and that I should track it down someday.
    What do you think of Richter's late recordings of op 110? There's a particularly fine one on Live Classics, with exceptional sound. I'm not so keen on his earlier ideas about Beethoven, which seem to be just about dazzling the audience with technique.


    511UaTtJjiL._PJautoripBadge,BottomRight,4,-40_OU11__.jpg

    The Zhukov is here

    511FlHNErCL.jpg


    And another one I remember admiring was Edwin Fischer's., especially in the final movement. Fischer's piano is really nice, wonderfully balanced in all the registers, they don't make pianos like that any more!

    In fact I listened to the Afanassiev today and started to feel less enthusiastic particularly about the second movement - I'm not sure anything follows, I'm probably wasn't much in the mood. There are two recordings of him doing op 110 - one in Moscow and one in Tokyo.

    The Demus shows the importance of fortepiano for the music, it would probably be my top choice in fact, at least in some moods!

    An op 110 I picked up recently and enjoyed was from Gulda, live in Montpellier. It was clearly a concert which caught him inspired - Gulda's like that, never bad but sometimes, rarely, he is touched by some sort of grace (another example is his Beethoven PC3 with Rossi)

    51B4aaN21TL.jpg

    I think the concert's outside, and at some point an aeroplane passes over! I rather like that - it reminds me of the recording by Wanda Landowska from the Second World War in Paris where you hear anti-aircraft guns. Apart from that the sound is fine.
    Last edited by Mandryka; Mar-29-2017 at 19:04.

  4. #48
    Senior Member AfterHours's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Location
    Oregon, USA
    Posts
    1,512
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by silentio View Post
    As stated in the original post, I'm not a fan of the Hammerklavier. But after seeing so many of you guys recommended Annie Fischer, I listened to her and I'm stunned. The Andante Sostenuto and the final fugue are unbearably intense.
    Yes! I don't know of any other that captures so powerfully the seething violence, frustration and desperation, the frantic urge to hear and be heard as if his life depended on it, and in the Andante, the time-stopping tears and devastation of it all, as Fischer's. Fischer reigns supreme in Beethoven's most dramatic sonatas (she is my top choice for #14, #21 and #23 as well) because she plays like her life depends on it. She consistently pushes her technique to the brink where it sounds like she is just on the verge of losing control, but then doesn't, and the tension is astonishing. It sounds like the storms of notes from the piano are taking over her body and the sound is swallowing her and she is completely immersed inside the tornado of what is happening. As mentioned above, among a very crowded field with many fine, classic interpretations, her "Appassionata", "Waldstein" and "Moonlight" are each the greatest I've ever heard as well. Others are more "polished" (Goode, Hamelin, and so forth) but no one outside of Arrau conveys her towering strength and depth of tone, and this quality is essential to relaying an emotional investment commensurate to Beethoven's own.
    Last edited by AfterHours; Mar-29-2017 at 20:36.

  5. Likes Bettina liked this post
  6. #49
    Senior Member AfterHours's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Location
    Oregon, USA
    Posts
    1,512
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mandryka View Post
    What do you think of Richter's late recordings of op 110? There's a particularly fine one on Live Classics, with exceptional sound. I'm not so keen on his earlier ideas about Beethoven, which seem to be just about dazzling the audience with technique.


    511UaTtJjiL._PJautoripBadge,BottomRight,4,-40_OU11__.jpg

    The Zhukov is here

    511FlHNErCL.jpg


    And another one I remember admiring was Edwin Fischer's., especially in the final movement. Fischer's piano is really nice, wonderfully balanced in all the registers, they don't make pianos like that any more!

    In fact I listened to the Afanassiev today and started to feel less enthusiastic particularly about the second movement - I'm not sure anything follows, I'm probably wasn't much in the mood. There are two recordings of him doing op 110 - one in Moscow and one in Tokyo.

    The Demus shows the importance of fortepiano for the music, it would probably be my top choice in fact, at least in some moods!

    An op 110 I picked up recently and enjoyed was from Gulda, live in Montpellier. It was clearly a concert which caught him inspired - Gulda's like that, never bad but sometimes, rarely, he is touched by some sort of grace (another example is his Beethoven PC3 with Rossi)

    51B4aaN21TL.jpg

    I think the concert's outside, and at some point an aeroplane passes over! I rather like that - it reminds me of the recording by Wanda Landowska from the Second World War in Paris where you hear anti-aircraft guns. Apart from that the sound is fine.
    Thank you for the recs!

    Re: Richter's late recordings ... I'm not sure I've heard his Op 110 from that period yet. I'll check out the one you have here.

    Re: Demus and fortepiano ... His Op 110 is among those that works quite well with this. I don't particularly dig fortepiano for works such as the Hammerklavier and Appassionata that thrive from a more forceful, larger sound, however. Now, if Andreas Staier takes a stab at those, I may change my mind... I do think Brautigam's are quite impressive for fortepiano that's for sure, and hold up decently next to a good number of modern piano versions.

    Re: Edwin Fischer ... I'm pretty sure I've heard that one and thought it was superb. I'll check it out to make sure, and/or to give it another go.

    Re: Gulda ... I've heard several of his but I don't think I've heard this particular rendition you mention. I'll check it out, thank you.
    Last edited by AfterHours; Mar-29-2017 at 21:07.

  7. #50
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    39,996
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by silentio View Post
    As stated in the original post, I'm not a fan of the Hammerklavier. But after seeing so many of you guys recommended Annie Fischer, I listened to her and I'm stunned. The Andante Sostenuto and the final fugue are unbearably intense.
    You see, sometimes one can change his / her mind
    First they ignore you, then they laugh at you, then they fight you, then you win.
    "Mahatma Gandhi"

  8. Likes silentio liked this post
  9. #51
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Ann Arbor, Michigan
    Posts
    610
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Pugg View Post
    You see, sometimes one can change his / her mind
    Actually, I still don't like the Hammerklavier, but I'm amazed by Fischer's playing

  10. #52
    Senior Member KenOC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    SoCal, USA
    Posts
    19,525
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Dame Myra Hess has wonderful renditions of the Opp. 109 and 110 on this old recording. Exceptional warmth.



  11. Likes silentio liked this post
  12. #53
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Ann Arbor, Michigan
    Posts
    610
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by KenOC View Post
    Dame Myra Hess has wonderful renditions of the Opp. 109 and 110 on this old recording. Exceptional warmth.

    Yes, a very lyrical reading of No.30 (the most lyrical of the late sonatas).

  13. #54
    Senior Member Blancrocher's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    6,544
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bettina View Post
    No. 28--Annie Fischer
    No. 29--Charles Rosen
    No. 30--Emil Gilels
    No. 31--Wilhelm Kempff
    No. 32--Alfred Brendel
    Glad to see that Rosen Hammerklavier mentioned—that was a revelation for me the first time I heard it, and it remains a favorite.

  14. Likes Bettina liked this post
  15. #55
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    California
    Posts
    2,601
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Blancrocher View Post
    Glad to see that Rosen Hammerklavier mentioned—that was a revelation for me the first time I heard it, and it remains a favorite.
    It's great to hear that you share my passion for the Rosen Hammerklavier! Rosen was one of those rare geniuses who was equally brilliant as a writer and performer. I love reading his analytical insights about the Hammerklavier (in The Classical Style and several other books), and listening to how he expresses those insights in his performance of the work.

  16. Likes hpowders, Blancrocher, Marinera liked this post
  17. #56
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    193
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    My favorites would be:
    Serkin
    Kempff
    Buchbinder

    I found it interesting that Buchbinder was not mentioned by anyone other than me?
    His complete set of Beethoven Piano Sonatas on RCA/ Sony is outstanding.

  18. Likes realdealblues liked this post
  19. #57
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Posts
    2,372
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Pollini, Richter-Hasser (28 to 32)
    Brautigam (28, 29, 31)
    Arrau (32)

  20. Likes David9 liked this post
  21. #58
    Senior Member realdealblues's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    MI
    Posts
    3,029
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    2

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by PeterF View Post
    My favorites would be:
    Serkin
    Kempff
    Buchbinder

    I found it interesting that Buchbinder was not mentioned by anyone other than me?
    His complete set of Beethoven Piano Sonatas on RCA/ Sony is outstanding.
    I really enjoy Buchbinder and his overall conception of the entire Sonata cycle. I prefer his earlier Piano Sonata cycle on Teldec though compared to his remakes for RCA.

  22. Likes hpowders liked this post
  23. #59
    Senior Member Tchaikov6's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    Madison, Wisconsin
    Posts
    3,630
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ekim the Insubordinate View Post
    Kempff and Pollini - but I tend to prefer Pollini.
    The same for me... but I tend to prefer Kempff.

  24. Likes Bettina liked this post
  25. #60
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    19,165
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Bruce Hungerford and Annie Fischer.

  26. Likes Bettina, Marinera liked this post
Page 4 of 10 FirstFirst 12345678 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Favorite recording of the Beethoven sonatas?
    By Ravellian in forum Classical Music Discussion
    Replies: 36
    Last Post: Mar-26-2019, 16:44
  2. Beethoven’s late piano sonatas – your favorite pianist?
    By KenOC in forum Classical Music Discussion
    Replies: 47
    Last Post: Dec-08-2016, 05:04
  3. Late Beethoven: Sonatas or quartets?
    By KenOC in forum Classical Music Discussion
    Replies: 31
    Last Post: Jan-01-2015, 16:04
  4. Favorite Beethoven piano sonatas
    By jani in forum Classical Music Discussion
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: Jul-24-2012, 19:19
  5. Favorite Piano Sonatas, aside from Beethoven
    By phoenixshade in forum Classical Music Discussion
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: Jan-06-2009, 13:01

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •