Page 122 of 377 FirstFirst ... 2272112118119120121122123124125126132172222 ... LastLast
Results 1,816 to 1,830 of 5644

Thread: What books are you currently reading?

  1. #1816
    Senior Member Ingélou's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Yorkshire
    Posts
    5,357
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    36

    Default

    It might. But I remember being told what a classic 'The Allegory of Love' by C. S. Lewis was when I was at university studying literature. I found it indigestible. I tried it again seven years later when I was doing my M.A. & after a few pages, was mixing up the Alka Seltzer.
    Last edited by Ingélou; Feb-07-2014 at 11:49.
    ~ Mollie ~
    My fiddle my joy.

  2. #1817
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    889
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    Günter Grass, Crabwalk - inspired by a recent post by KenOC in the "On this day ..." thread. Thanks for that!

  3. Likes samurai, Kieran, SiegendesLicht liked this post
  4. #1818
    Senior Member Kieran's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Dublin, Ireland
    Posts
    2,937
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Andreas View Post
    Günter Grass, Crabwalk - inspired by a recent post by KenOC in the "On this day ..." thread. Thanks for that!
    It's a very good book, and if you're starting out in Grass, he has several major works, the ones I enjoyed most being Meeting at Telgte, The Flounder, Crabwalk, and of course, The Tin Drum, which is European literature writ large...
    The Brain - is wider than the Sky

  5. Likes Andreas, SiegendesLicht liked this post
  6. #1819
    Senior Member Crudblud's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    2,898
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    17

    Default

    J.D. Salinger - The Catcher in the Rye

    I never read it when I was a teenager, so I'm catching up with it now.

  7. Likes MrTortoise, Andreas, TalkingHead and 8 others liked this post
  8. #1820
    Senior Member Kieran's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Dublin, Ireland
    Posts
    2,937
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Crudblud View Post
    J.D. Salinger - The Catcher in the Rye

    I never read it when I was a teenager, so I'm catching up with it now.
    I read that one recently. Have started Mason & Dixon and already I'm bothering my pals with it. It's the beauty of a site like this, you get recommendations which couldn't happen anywhere else (unless you're one of the chums I'm bugging to read M&D right now).

    While waiting for M&D, I read an Everyman Pocketbook of Roman Odes, Elegies and Epigrams. Men like Ovid, Horace, Virgil, plying their trade, translated in Ye Olde Tongue by the likes of Samuel Johnson and Lord Byron. These Roman chappies didn't mince their words, and the topics range from girls who transform into trees to escape a rapist, bethrothed lasses who squeeze the blood from still-beating pigeon hearts to fool their husbands on their wedding night, Narcissus by his pool, and the usual mix of bawdy and beautiful things they thought about. Actually, their preoccupations weren't any different to our own.

    A book which recently disappointed me was Kazuo Ishiguro's When We Were Orphans. Maybe somebody can explain this to me: was he delusional? The plot just gets to unbearably incredible to be mere "plot", but if he's mad, then his madness isn't made overly apparent.

    Not to me, anyhow, but maybe I'm fishing in the wrong pool...
    The Brain - is wider than the Sky

  9. Likes Crudblud, Mahlerian, ShropshireMoose and 1 others liked this post
  10. #1821
    Senior Member Cheyenne's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    801
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Crudblud View Post
    J.D. Salinger - The Catcher in the Rye

    I never read it when I was a teenager, so I'm catching up with it now.
    Perfect book when I was 14, truly. Nine Stories is very nice too.

  11. #1822
    Senior Member Whistler Fred's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Chicago, IL
    Posts
    198
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I'm alternating between two books. One is The Time Travelers Guide to Elizabethan England by Ian Mortimer. The other is a collection of all of Manly Wade Wellman's John Thunstone stories.

  12. Likes Kieran, Sonata liked this post
  13. #1823
    Senior Member schuberkovich's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    393
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I've just started One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest by Ken Kesey.

  14. Likes Kieran, Sonata, GreenMamba and 1 others liked this post
  15. #1824
    Senior Member Marschallin Blair's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    9,367
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ingélou View Post
    It might. But I remember being told what a classic 'The Allegory of Love' by C. S. Lewis was when I was at university studying literature. I found it indigestible. I tried it again seven years later when I was doing my M.A. & after a few pages, was mixing up the Alka Seltzer.
    Ever try C.S. Lewis' That Hideous Strength?-- prescient novel, that; given the times we now live in.
    "Let me have my own way in exactly everything, and a sunnier and more pleasant creature does not exist." - Thomas Carlyle

  16. #1825
    Moderator Huilunsoittaja's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Ohio, USA
    Posts
    3,785
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    168

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Marschallin Blair View Post
    Ever try C.S. Lewis' That Hideous Strength?-- prescient novel, that; given the times we now live in.
    The Space Trilogy is rather disturbing, isn't it? Not at all friendly like the Chronicles of Narnia. That Hideous Strength especially disturbed me with the bloody ending. I actually imagine some talkclassical members to have characteristics similar to a lot of those N.I.C.E. people...
    Last edited by Huilunsoittaja; Feb-07-2014 at 19:11.
    "Music is an art, and art is forever. Music should not succumb to fashion, which is passing and forgotten."
    Glazunov


    Join TC's Official Russian Composer Fanclub!

    Oh, and, here's my professional website!

  17. Likes Ingélou, Taggart, Antiquarian and 1 others liked this post
  18. #1826
    Senior Member Berlioznestpasmort's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    120
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Julian Barnes' memoir on mortality: Nothing to Be Afraid Of. His candor may be a stretch for some readers, but may as well be ready, or as ready as one can be, I say. Couple of wonderful Sibelius quotes therein, one of which is good advice to musicians and other creatives: "Always remember that there is no city in Europe which contains a statue to a critic." "Misunderstand me correctly," is t'other. One of Mozart's doesn't improve his status with me; from Paris he wrote to his father: "You prob. know that that godless arch-rogue Voltaire has died like a dog, like a beast - that's his reward!" Voltaire was, of course, hardly godless.
    « Il faut collectionner les pierres qu'on vous jette. C'est le début d'un piédestal. » - Hector Berlioz

  19. Likes Blancrocher liked this post
  20. #1827
    Senior Member Ingélou's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Yorkshire
    Posts
    5,357
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    36

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Marschallin Blair View Post
    Ever try C.S. Lewis' That Hideous Strength?-- prescient novel, that; given the times we now live in.
    You're right. Yes, I like C. S. Lewis's science-fiction trilogy, and I like his children's books and theological books too. Just not 'The Allegory of Love'. Well, there's always a clot among the cream!
    ~ Mollie ~
    My fiddle my joy.

  21. Likes Sonata, Taggart, Marschallin Blair liked this post
  22. #1828
    Senior Member Berlioznestpasmort's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    120
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by hpowders View Post
    "God's Problem. How the Bible Fails to Answer Our Most Important Question-Why We Suffer". Bart D Ehrman, James A Gray Distinguished Professor of Religious Studies,University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.
    Wonder if he might have been inspired by the Simpsons' movie
    the-simpsons-movie.jpg

    In church, Grandpa' Simpson goes into what appears to be an epileptic fit (or a religious trance) shouting "EPA, EPA!" Homer looks feverishly through the Bible for help: "There's no answers in here!" he cries out to the congegration.
    Last edited by Berlioznestpasmort; Feb-07-2014 at 21:42.
    « Il faut collectionner les pierres qu'on vous jette. C'est le début d'un piédestal. » - Hector Berlioz

  23. #1829
    Senior Member arpeggio's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Burke, Virginia, USA
    Posts
    3,359
    Post Thanks / Like

    Question Henry Pleasants THE AGONY OF MODERN MUSIC

    I have just completed reading Henry Pleasants' The Agony of Modern Music.

    Although he makes some interesting observations, I agree with William Schuman's assessment of the book: "Frankly, I found this angry little volume filled with superficial data to support a previously arrived at conclusion."

    This book was published in 1955. Whenever I read the rhetoric of anti-modernists, they employ the exact same arguments that Pleasant espoused a generation ago.
    It is impossible to make anything foolproof because fools are so ingenious. And I am a very ingenious fellow

  24. Likes Mahlerian, GreenMamba liked this post
  25. #1830
    Junior Member Masada's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    43
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default "Van Gogh: The Life"

    After seeing a significant retrospective a while back, I'm thoroughly enjoying the very slow reading of Van Gogh: The Life:

    "I could compare my music to white light which contains all colours. Only a prism can divide the colours and make them appear; this prism could be the spirit of the listener."
    - Arvo Pärt

    --
    MacBook Pro (2013); MacBook Pro (2008); Peachtree Decco 65; B&W 685's; Apple TV; Sony BDP-7100 CD/BluRay; iTunes; Sonic Studio's Amarra; Audirvana Plus; Audioquest Forrest USB; low-end speaker cable and interconnects for now.

  26. Likes Blancrocher liked this post

Similar Threads

  1. Do you like reading?
    By Mephistopheles in forum Community Forum
    Replies: 59
    Last Post: Sep-14-2017, 02:25
  2. Replies: 73
    Last Post: Sep-26-2014, 00:10
  3. If you are reading this...
    By Argus in forum Community Forum
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: Mar-31-2012, 19:07
  4. What are we all reading?
    By Somnifer in forum Community Forum
    Replies: 33
    Last Post: Oct-05-2009, 11:38
  5. reading
    By ipson in forum Recorded Music and Publications
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: Sep-11-2006, 20:24

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •