Page 342 of 343 FirstFirst ... 242292332338339340341342343 LastLast
Results 5,116 to 5,130 of 5143

Thread: What books are you currently reading?

  1. #5116
    Senior Member Blancrocher's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    6,476
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Ian Watt, The Rise of the Novel

  2. #5117
    Senior Member Kieran's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Dublin, Ireland
    Posts
    2,852
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    Went through a brief Graham Greene phase, read three of his magnificent works: The Quiet American, Our Man in Havana, and The Honorary Consul. Superior prose and insight, with the thrills of great narratives. Humorous too. Still working through the James Bond books, really enjoying them.

    Currently? The Sellout, by Paul Beatty. It's okay, but no more. I find books like this to be difficult to enjoy. Partly it's their unearned celebrity. Or maybe I should say, the noise of their celebrity. This one is supposed to compare to Swift, which piqued my interest. I give Beatty credit for saying it's not a comedic work, and it's not satire. I agree with this, and I don't mean that as a criticism. My criticism is that the book is filled with unrealistic characters, non sequiturs, and rambling passages of inane observations that only stall the book's progress, though in reality they're written to say something about the author. He got his plaudits. Mission accomplished.

    In a different way, it reminds me of a book I read last year, A Naked Singularity, by Sergio de la Pava, if memory serves. This had sub-Tarantino dialogue diversions that only bloated the work, but didn't serve it. A good editor would have found a great book in there, only 300 pages long, not 3000, or whatever it was...
    The Brain - is wider than the Sky

  3. Likes senza sordino, Roger Knox liked this post
  4. #5118
    Senior Member Faramundo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Beauvais, Picardy, France
    Posts
    181
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Antoine Blondin, l'Europe Buissonnière.
    About half way now, and I would rate it 5/5.
    I've got this 1961 pocket edition, only 3 years younger than me.

    51rMQJxVSFL._SX327_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg

  5. #5119
    Senior Member jegreenwood's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    NYC
    Posts
    1,957
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Kieran View Post
    Went through a brief Graham Greene phase, read three of his magnificent works: The Quiet American, Our Man in Havana, and The Honorary Consul. Superior prose and insight, with the thrills of great narratives. Humorous too. Still working through the James Bond books, really enjoying them.

    Currently? The Sellout, by Paul Beatty. It's okay, but no more. I find books like this to be difficult to enjoy. Partly it's their unearned celebrity. Or maybe I should say, the noise of their celebrity. This one is supposed to compare to Swift, which piqued my interest. I give Beatty credit for saying it's not a comedic work, and it's not satire. I agree with this, and I don't mean that as a criticism. My criticism is that the book is filled with unrealistic characters, non sequiturs, and rambling passages of inane observations that only stall the book's progress, though in reality they're written to say something about the author. He got his plaudits. Mission accomplished.

    In a different way, it reminds me of a book I read last year, A Naked Singularity, by Sergio de la Pava, if memory serves. This had sub-Tarantino dialogue diversions that only bloated the work, but didn't serve it. A good editor would have found a great book in there, only 300 pages long, not 3000, or whatever it was...
    A Naked Singularity came to me highly recommended by several people. I didn't agree.

    I am close to finishing The Gold Bug Variations. Also a disappointment. The author seems happy to throw in half a dozen metaphors for every concept he wants to convey. And most of them involve big words, lots of molecular biology, a bit of musicology, a bit of information theory and a whole bunch of other stuff. Just to show how broad his knowledge is. All to support a rather silly soap opera plot, and his wonder about the miracle of life (in a biological sense). Not sure why I've continued reading it (600+ pages), except I rarely put down a serious work of literature.

    I don't mind challenging reads. I've done Ulysses, In Search of Lost Time, all of Pynchon, etc. I've also done Godel, Escher, Bach, to which Gold Bug is oddly similar.

    I should have spent the time listening to 30 versions of The Goldberg Variations.

  6. Likes Kieran liked this post
  7. #5120
    Senior Member KenOC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    SoCal, USA
    Posts
    19,328
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I'm re-reading, after quite a few years, The Selfish Gene by Richard Dawkins. He has a bizarre way of looking at evolution, but it's hard to find fault with his logic! Aside from being interesting, the book is entertaining.


  8. #5121
    Senior Member jegreenwood's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    NYC
    Posts
    1,957
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by KenOC View Post
    I'm re-reading, after quite a few years, The Selfish Gene by Richard Dawkins. He has a bizarre way of looking at evolution, but it's hard to find fault with his logic! Aside from being interesting, the book is entertaining.
    After The Gold Bug Variations, I might never again read a book about evolution.

  9. #5122
    Senior Member Captainnumber36's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Posts
    5,530
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Treasure Island.

  10. Likes Kieran, bharbeke liked this post
  11. #5123
    Senior Member Faramundo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Beauvais, Picardy, France
    Posts
    181
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    mort-a-credit.jpg

    Like a fantastic opera on misery and blackness.

  12. #5124
    Senior Member millionrainbows's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    12,800
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    137

    Default

    Modernism, by Peter Gay

    Modernism 200 dpi .jpg
    "The way out is through the door. Why is it that no one will use this method?"
    -Confucious

    "In Spring! In the creation of art it must be as it is in Spring!" -Arnold Schoenberg

    "We only become what we are by the radical and deep-seated refusal of that which others have made us." -Jean-Paul Sartre

    "I don't mind dying, as long as I can still breathe." ---Me

  13. #5125
    Senior Member Captainnumber36's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Posts
    5,530
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Peter Pan!

  14. #5126
    Senior Member Captainnumber36's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Posts
    5,530
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Tom Sawyer! (I've been doing audiobooks, they go fast!).

  15. #5127
    Senior Member Pat Fairlea's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    Yorkshire, U.K.
    Posts
    1,178
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Scan001.jpg

    I have just finished this one.
    It won't affect how I feel about Debussy's music, but Mon Dieu that man was a veritable pain in the backside!

  16. #5128
    Senior Member Baron Scarpia's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Location
    California
    Posts
    1,236
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jegreenwood View Post
    After The Gold Bug Variations, I might never again read a book about evolution.
    Weren't you encouraging me to read that book?

    A good book with a biology/genetics theme is Mendel's Dwarf, by Simon Mawer.

  17. #5129
    Senior Member Baron Scarpia's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Location
    California
    Posts
    1,236
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Salvage the Bones, Jesmyn Ward



    Takes some time for the story to get off the ground, but in the end an engaging depiction of Hurricane Katrina and it's aftermath among the rural poor.

  18. #5130
    Senior Member jegreenwood's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    NYC
    Posts
    1,957
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Baron Scarpia View Post
    Weren't you encouraging me to read that book?

    A good book with a biology/genetics theme is Mendel's Dwarf, by Simon Mawer.
    Before I got into it. It should have been tailor-made for this forum. Lots of time spent on Bach - trying to use the Goldberg variations as a metaphor for evolution, the way DNA works, etc. Or maybe evolution as a metaphor for the Goldberg variations.

    Edit - A lot of critics raved about it when it was first published. And the author just won a Pulitzer Prize for fiction. I think one of the reasons I was so critical was that my expectations were very high. YMMV.
    Last edited by jegreenwood; Aug-28-2019 at 19:16.

Similar Threads

  1. Do you like reading?
    By Mephistopheles in forum Community Forum
    Replies: 59
    Last Post: Sep-14-2017, 02:25
  2. Replies: 73
    Last Post: Sep-26-2014, 00:10
  3. If you are reading this...
    By Argus in forum Community Forum
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: Mar-31-2012, 19:07
  4. What are we all reading?
    By Somnifer in forum Community Forum
    Replies: 33
    Last Post: Oct-05-2009, 11:38
  5. reading
    By ipson in forum Recorded Music and Publications
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: Sep-11-2006, 20:24

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •