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Thread: What books are you currently reading?

  1. #5971
    Senior Member flamencosketches's Avatar
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    I just finished Raymond Carver's What We Talk About When We Talk About Love



    I really loved it. Carver's writing is very incisive, and there's a lot more warmth to it than I was expecting. Can't wait to read more of his work.

  2. #5972
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    I ain't in a habit of reading books.

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    Member ToneDeaf&Senile's Avatar
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    At 1230 today, 4 Apr 2021, I concluded an initial read of Andrzej Sapkowski's The Tower of Fools, book one of his Hussite Trilogy. It was a slow read for me. Not sure why. I like it well enough. In fact, it falls within a sub-genre I'm particularly fond of, a cross between historical fiction and fantasy with 'naturalistic' magical elements. Somewhat along the lines of what Guy Gavriel Kay produces, though with different emphasis. Added allure, for me, comes from Tower being set in the same general location as Kingdom Come Deliverance, book and game being only a few decades apart. I'll definitely buy book two when it premieres later this year.



    I'm not quite sure what I'll dig into next. Likely a return to Cornwell's Saga Tales series.

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    Senior Member WNvXXT's Avatar
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    Joe Pickett #21


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    Senior Member senza sordino's Avatar
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    I have just finished reading The Perfect Spy by John le Carre. I gave it two out of five stars on Goodreads. I found its prose too tortuous and overly dense and complicated. It wasn't an easy read. The story was interesting, but the method of telling that story wasn't. And there is a nearly continuous switching of perspective. Looking at the reviews on Goodreads, it seems as if people who didn't like it came to the same conclusion I did. But there are equally as many people who loved it. Your mileage may vary.


    I picked up the le Carre book when I was half done with Britain After Rome. I am now resuming this non-fiction book. It's fascinating. The author spends more time describing the life and times of the so-called dark ages and less time listing the Kings and rulers of the seven or so Kingdoms.
    Last edited by senza sordino; Apr-04-2021 at 21:50.

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    Senior Member Chilham's Avatar
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    410-878 is an interesting time in Britain. A fascinating mixture of history and folklore. I've lined-up some reading on the Kingdom of Kent at that time (my neck of the woods).

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    Senior Member Captainnumber36's Avatar
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    I just finished reading A Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde and loved it. It actually really creeped me out and made me fear what I myself am capable of doing, or even other folks.


    Anyone else read it?

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    Senior Member SixFootScowl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by atsizat View Post
    I ain't in a habit of reading books.
    Maybe you could pick up a volume of short stories as a starting point.
    "Yea, the stork in the heaven knoweth her appointed times; and the turtle and the crane and the swallow observe the time of their coming; but my people know not the judgment of the Lord." Jeremiah 8:7

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    Quote Originally Posted by SixFootScowl View Post
    Maybe you could pick up a volume of short stories as a starting point.
    I second that suggestion. Perhaps you may like "A Madman's Diary" by Lu Xun, which is a metaphorical short story about the decay of Chinese language after the Qing dynasty. I find the writing to be engaging and the premise to be intriguing. One of the best short stories I have read. It doesn't require a lot of prior knowledge of Chinese history to appreciate it.

    Here's the link: Selected Stories of Lu Hsun

    Note: some of the terminology are different from other versions due to different phonetic system, but it shouldn't distract you from the story, unless you have a heavy (almost academic) interest in Chinese history and culture.

    If you like the story after reading it and want to read more stories from the author, I suggest reading "The True Story of Ah Q" which is longer but is worthwhile once you "get into it".
    Last edited by Conrad2; Apr-08-2021 at 06:12.

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    Senior Member WNvXXT's Avatar
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    Turned into a great read. Another non-fiction writer to add to my list. Learned about the origins of the geology that caused the eruption, and the man whose theories were discounted and years after his death, they turned out to be true. One of many facts and personalities throughout this amazing story that add to it's readability.

    I initially started reading the kindle ebook, but on a whim I got the hardcover and found the kindle was severely shortchanging the reader on illustrations; maps, diagrams, drawings - so I finished the last 2/3 with an old fashioned book.

    [ goodreads ]


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    Senior Member jegreenwood's Avatar
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    After a break with several detective novels (not worth mentioning) I am back to the last third of The Magic Mountain.

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    Senior Member jegreenwood's Avatar
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    After a break with several detective novels (not worth mentioning) I am back to the last third of The Magic Mountain.

    I wish I had read calvinpv's post before I chose the detective novels. I picked up a Ross McDonald last year after not having read one in 50 years (at which time I read a number of them). It was around then that he was being lionized. I remember an especially glowing review in the NY Times (June 1, 1969 - I checked). But I didn't think they would hold up. I was wrong.
    Last edited by jegreenwood; Apr-08-2021 at 15:33.

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    Senior Member Allegro Con Brio's Avatar
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    After starting it last summer and reluctantly putting it aside after finding it a bit impenetratable, I’ve taken up Faulkner’s Absalom, Absalom! again. Wow, how perceptions change. I’m totally hooked. Positively rich writing, just lyrical and opulent and magnetic. A haunting, wistful tale told by one of the finest literary psychologists and prose stylists of the century. The impossibly long sentences take a while to get into, however, and are probably the most significant barrier to understanding the novel.
    "If we understood the world, we would realize that there is a logic of harmony underlying its manifold apparent dissonances." - Jean Sibelius

    "Art, like morality, consists of drawing the line somewhere." - G.K. Chesterton

    "Ceaseless work, analysis, reflection, writing much, endless self-correction, that is my secret." - Johann Sebastian Bach

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  23. #5984
    Senior Member annaw's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Allegro Con Brio View Post
    After starting it last summer and reluctantly putting it aside after finding it a bit impenetratable, I’ve taken up Faulkner’s Absalom, Absalom! again. Wow, how perceptions change. I’m totally hooked. Positively rich writing, just lyrical and opulent and magnetic. A haunting, wistful tale told by one of the finest literary psychologists and prose stylists of the century. The impossibly long sentences take a while to get into, however, and are probably the most significant barrier to understanding the novel.
    I also finished it, and it was utterly wonderful! The character development is simply marvellous.

    I finished Sartre's "Nausea" and, while I do not agree with a lot of Sartre's philosophy, it was so elegantly and vividly written. Really an amazing book.
    Last edited by annaw; Apr-08-2021 at 19:18.

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    Senior Member Barbebleu's Avatar
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    Halfway through Joe Hill’s Horns. I knew his work through his graphic novel output but if his other novels are like Horns they will be on my reading list quick-smart. Of course he has good writing genes but that doesn’t always follow!
    "...it is said that first your heart sings, then you play. I think if it is not like that, then it is only just combination of notes, isn't it? " - Pandit Nikhil Banerjee, Master of the Sitar.

    ‘When in trouble, when in doubt, run in circles, scream and shout!‘

    ‘Common sense is not a gift, it's a curse. Because you have to deal with people who don't possess it!’

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