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Thread: B.D. rd.1 - Bottesini

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    Senior Member PostMinimalist's Avatar
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    Default B.D. rd.1 - Bottesini

    Giovanni Bottesini

    Dear fellow travellers and members of the TalkClassical community, I would like to say a few words on my own behalf in the intrests of self-preservation.



    My name is Giovanni Bottesini. I was born in Crema, a small town in northern Italy, on Christmas eve in 1822. Gentlemen, I am a specialist in the truest sense of the word. I believe that I was put on this earth to bring the art of double bass playing to its absolute pinacle and, through doing so, make every piece of music written involving that instrument thereafter more listenable. Until my revolution in double bass technique and my introduction of the 'French' bow model to double bass playing, orchestras sounded as if a delivery of a ton of potatoes was being made whenever the basses played. Now when the basses play we are warmed by thier tone and clear intonation thanks to me.

    Here is a short example of my work played by the Virtuoso player Boguslaw Furtok:

    Bottesini - Tarantella

    I was also active as a composer and conductor during my life, having written over 170 works including 10 operas, several concertos (2 for double bass, and others for bass with other instruments), over 40 works for double bass and piano which form the core of the modern repertoire for that instrument, 11 string quartets, a Requiem mass, an oratorio and many other small scalle works.

    I was entrusted by my freind Giuseppe Verdi to conduct the pemiere of his masterpiece opera Aida which was commissioned for the opening of the great canal at Suez in Egypt. It was for me that Verdi wrote his famous solo at the begining of act 3 of Othello. My other travels were also adventurous and interesting taking me as far afield as Buenos Aires, Havana, New York, Paris, St Petersburg and London. Where ever I went, I was hailed as the 'Paganini of the double bass'. I would play at professional musical gatherings and perform cello parts in string quartets and solos of such dexterity and beauty that critics were moved to write that I 'had a thousand nightingales caged in my instrument'.

    The trip across the Atlantic was most arduous and I suffered sea sickness for two months and on arriving at Havana I discovered that the opera house where I was to conduct had been destroyed in fire. I helped rebuild it and gave the premiere of my opera Christopher Columbus there at the re-opening. I also accepted the post of principal bassist in the opera orchestra there being asked to perform pyrotechnical operatic fantasies of my own composition in the intervals for which I was of course renumreated very well.

    Hector Berlioz praise my Concertos and Felix Mendelssohn was also suitably impressed with my skills. I even wrote a concerto in his style which remains one of the jewels in the crown of the instruments repetoire. I have chosen too to create music for the double bass in the style of Frederik Chopin, my Allegretto Capriccio is titled "Ala Chopin' in his honour.

    There are speculations about my death in the summer of 1889 after a sudden illness, being foul play. It has even been suggested that I was murdered. If by some fateful blow, in this second chance that I am being given here, I am to be thrown from the basket I could say that I'm getting used to it! I appeal now to your sense of justice and the fact that you would be doomed to hear out of tune, thunderingly noisey basses in concerts ever after, and petition your good judgement to ensure my prolonged survival so that you may learn even more about my music and my contribution to your musical enjoyment.

    your devoted maestro,
    Giovanni Bottesini


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    Senior Member Elgarian's Avatar
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    Well, surely only a heartless villain would cast such a man out of the balloon ....

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    Senior Member Margaret's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by post-minimalist View Post
    Giovanni Bottesini
    I appeal now to your sense of justice and the fact that you would be doomed to hear out of tune, thunderingly noisey basses in concerts ever after
    Well, that's a pretty effective argument: Keep him around because he saved every orchestral piece we listen to from being ruined. Don't think anyone else is going to be able to make an argument like that.

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    I didn't know anything about you before this Mr Bottesini, but I have to say you make a pretty convincing argument.

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    With the balloon descending as such a leisurely pace I thought you might like to hear one of my Operatic Fantasies.
    Since I can't play it myself from beyond the grave, here's Boguslav Furtok again playing the Fantasy on Themes form Bellini's 'Sonnambula'

    Bottesini - Sonnambula Fantasy

    Enjoy!
    Avante Maestro!
    Giovanni Bottesini

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    Senior Member World Violist's Avatar
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    Very convincing indeed. I don't know if it's possible to be more convincing, really.

    WV
    You get a frog in your throat, you sound hoarse.

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    convincing is my middle name.
    None the less I think it's about time to start looking into making a makeshift parachute out of my double bass case!

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    Senior Member World Violist's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by post-minimalist View Post
    convincing is my middle name.
    None the less I think it's about time to start looking into making a makeshift parachute out of my double bass case!
    Did you bring your double bass on??? That's a good bit more weight... maybe if you tossed it over the side it would let two of us survive?

    -D.D. Shostakovich
    You get a frog in your throat, you sound hoarse.

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    Senior Member PostMinimalist's Avatar
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    Where my Testore goes I go, Signiore!
    Gio. Botttesini

    Quite literally. I always visit the local luthier for repairs to damage from the trip, when arriving in a new city!
    G.B.

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