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Thread: Pieces that make you cry

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    I once sat through a performance of Wagner’s Die Walkure that made my cry when I realized that was 6 hours of my life that I will never have back

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    Senior Member znapschatz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Triplets View Post
    I once sat through a performance of Wagner’s Die Walkure that made my cry when I realized that was 6 hours of my life that I will never have back
    I had an entirely different reaction to Die Walkure. Although as a young man I was already familiar with several operas on record, Saturday at the Met on radio, and a few films, this was the first live opera performance I ever attended. It was in 1960 at the old Metropolitan Opera house. I was in the Army then, stationed at Fort Dix, NJ, and on a weekend pass to New York City. They let me in free on account of the uniform, and I got to hear Birgit Nilsson during her debut season at the Met as Brunhilde. I was hooked for life.
    "Art is not a mirror held up to society but a hammer with which to shape it."
    - Bertolt Brecht -

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    Well I don’t know what to make of this I have not heard a piece of music that made my cry for the sake of the music alone, there are some that make me sad because they remind me of someone no longer with us but that is due to personal memories.
    Having said this and in a lighter vein I do verge on the point of tears when hearing what passes for music by some modern composers.

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    Mozart's Masonic Funeral Music
    "Music in any generation is not what the public thinks of it but what the musicians make of it"....Virgil Thomson

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    Brahms ~ Ein Deutsches Requiem, Op. 45 (II/VII) ~ Herbert von Karajan/ Denn alles fleisch es ist wie gras

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  11. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by Triplets View Post
    I once sat through a performance of Wagner’s Die Walkure that made my cry when I realized that was 6 hours of my life that I will never have back
    What fortitude... You're a better man than I am, Gunga Din!”

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    The love scene under the baton of Charles Dutoit touches me even deeper.
    All we like sheep

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    The closing moments of the slow movement of Elgar's 1st symphony. Such a subtle and over-whelming feeling of nostalgia seems to take hold of me. Nimrod gets me too. The pastoral central section of In the South as well.
    Much of Mahler's music. Too much to mention. In concert, the 3rd symphony adagio just puts me away.
    The closing of Parsifal by Wagner.
    Lots of Bruckner. When I saw Chailly and the Gewandhaus perform the 7th in NYC, the closing two minutes of the first movement had me in tears. A wonderful performance of the entire work that evening.

    So much music makes me tear up. It could be exultant music, loud, soft or otherwise. Dvorak's Cello Concerto, slow movement. How can one possibly not be moved by that? The final peroration of Swan Lake gets me too. The simple transformation of the main theme going from minor to major, the harp chords ascending to the final peroration by the orchestra. Yeah....it gets me.
    Last edited by KJ von NNJ; Nov-21-2017 at 03:20.

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    It may seem hackneyed, but Vaughan Williams's Fantasia on a Theme by Thomas Tallis, really gets me at certain times. I suppose it is a combination of Vaughan-Williams's own nostalgic style combined with the Tallis fragment from even deeper within English music.

    I'm not a flag-waver, but I am nostalgic for a a 'lost' England that was already disappearing when I was a boy. Or maybe it never really was.

    RVW's 3rd Symphony (Pastoral) also has this effect.

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    Emilie Mayer's Adagio from her 7th Symphony, makes me teary eyed. Beautiful. From 10:50 in this vid

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3GaUyM8gr_Q&t=882s

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    Quote Originally Posted by MusicSybarite View Post
    The Sunrise and the Summit sections in the Eine Alpensinfonie by Strauss. It's apotheosic, ultra life-affirming.
    Yes, but I am even more moved by the "Ausklang" section, just as the pipe organ joins in. It is the yearning of a mountain climber who has just been there on the heights, and has come back, and can think of nothing else except how to return to the mountains again.

    Also, the last movement of Mahler's 9th often makes me shed a tear, and the last movement of his 3rd. There is such a great power and tenderness about both.
    The adagio of Bruckner's 7th symphony - his requiem to the Meister.
    The second-to-last lied from Schubert's Winterreise - "Nebensonnen", especially as performed by Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau. The last words "Im Dunkeln wird mir wohler sein" (in the darkness I will feel better) give me goosebumps and tears. It is not just the coming of the night that is meant there, but the final darkness of death.
    Act I of Wagner's Parsifal, from the Transformation Music to the end.
    Siegfried and Brünnhilde's duet at the prologue to Götterdämmerung - because their ecstatic happiness is just about to end so soon.

    Etc, etc, etc.
    Last edited by SiegendesLicht; Nov-22-2017 at 10:01.
    ... yet for us will still remain the holy German art... (Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg)
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    God gave all men all earth to love,
    But since our hearts are small,
    Ordained for each one spot should prove
    Beloved over all.
    R. Kipling

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    I have been to Auschwitz...

    Now imagine yourself alone at night, dimmed lights, then listening to the second part of the third symphony by Gorécki...

    https://youtu.be/T-Up_oEd5do

    Text second movement

    No, Mother, do not weep,
    Most chaste Queen of Heaven
    Support me always.

    "Zdrowas Mario." (*)
    (Prayer inscribed on wall 3 of cell no. 3 in the basement of "Palace," the Gestapo's headquarters in Zadopane; beneath is the signature of Helena Wanda Blazusiakówna, and the words "18 years old, imprisoned since 26 September 1944.")
    (*) "Zdrowas Mario" (Ave Maria)—the opening of the Polish prayer to the Holy Mother
    'A symphony must be like the world. It must contain everything.'
    Gustav Mahler


    Friendly greetings
    gustavdimitri


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    Bravo for the mention of Górecki‘s 3rd. I’ve also found it deeply moving.
    "That's all Folks!"

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    Tchaikovsky 9 Sacred Pieces No 6 - Lord's Prayer

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    Quote Originally Posted by SiegendesLicht View Post
    Yes, but I am even more moved by the "Ausklang" section, just as the pipe organ joins in. It is the yearning of a mountain climber who has just been there on the heights, and has come back, and can think of nothing else except how to return to the mountains again.

    Also, the last movement of Mahler's 9th often makes me shed a tear, and the last movement of his 3rd. There is such a great power and tenderness about both.
    The adagio of Bruckner's 7th symphony - his requiem to the Meister.
    The second-to-last lied from Schubert's Winterreise - "Nebensonnen", especially as performed by Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau. The last words "Im Dunkeln wird mir wohler sein" (in the darkness I will feel better) give me goosebumps and tears. It is not just the coming of the night that is meant there, but the final darkness of death.
    Act I of Wagner's Parsifal, from the Transformation Music to the end.
    Siegfried and Brünnhilde's duet at the prologue to Götterdämmerung - because their ecstatic happiness is just about to end so soon.

    Etc, etc, etc.
    Good choices of music to surrender yourself to.

    We share the same reaction. My wife thinks I am bonkers when that Götterdämmerung prologue leaves me in tears. I have experienced it during moments in opera where seemingly joyous or triumphant events are eventually headed for disaster, a struggle for me to hold back when in a public situation.

    There are moments in other operas that have had a similar effect on me, like the pretender Dmitri's triumphal entrance in the final act of Boris Godunov. A number of years ago, I was washing my clothes at a laundromat, and while waiting the dryer to complete its cycle, watching that very scene on television during an ABC Opera Workshop production of Boris. At one point, I became aware of a noise that sounded like one of the machines had an unbalanced load. It took me more than a few seconds to realize it was me, sobbing.
    Last edited by znapschatz; Nov-22-2017 at 17:55. Reason: grammar
    "Art is not a mirror held up to society but a hammer with which to shape it."
    - Bertolt Brecht -

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