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Thread: Pieces that make you cry

  1. #61
    Senior Member Haydn man's Avatar
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    My wife is prone to tears at concerts
    Mahler 5 slow movement had the desired efffect as the most recent example

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  3. #62
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    RPhO Mahler3 O Mensch

    O Mensch Gib acht

    Mahler 3, Rotterdam Philharmonic Orchestra

    Yannick Nezet Seguin, conductor

    Karen Cargill, mezzo soprano

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  5. #63
    Senior Member Sloe's Avatar
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    The second movement in Franz Berwald´s fourth symphony because it is so beautiful:



    It was used as theme for a tv serial in the late seventies and early eighties.
    Last edited by Sloe; Nov-23-2017 at 08:27.

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  7. #64
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    Mozart's Requiem, especially the Requiem part and Brahms' Deutsches Requiem. Really beautiful. I seem to have a weakness for requiems.

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    In the right mood, almost any of my favorites. But the usual culprits are:

    Duruflé's Requiem. If I haven't gotten misty-eyed by the Agnus Dei, that unfailingly does it.
    Britten's Hymn to St. Cecilia (I'm glad someone else mentioned it. It's just lovely.)
    The end of Shostakovich's 10th, for whatever reason.
    Respighi's Pines of Rome, as the final movement builds to the climax
    The second movement of Rodrigo's Concierto de Aranjuez, particularly the restatement of the theme at the end. Wistful, magnificent, etc.

    (Mind you, I'm someone who tears up in virtually no other circumstances. So I need this, haha.)
    Last edited by archimago; Dec-03-2017 at 03:08.

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    Renee Fleming - Strauss' 4 Last Songs - Im abendrot

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  11. #67
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    Few years ago I heard Luigi Nono's "Como una ola de fuerza y luz" live in concert. The sheer power of the orchestra and the touching poem mourning the death of a chilean leftist resistance fighter Luciano Cruz really moved me to tears and left my body shaking for hours after the concert. It's a tough piece to listen live, as the dynamics raise to such extremes. For example, near the end of the piece it has two piccolos playing minor seconds in a very high register for at least 30-40s continuously.

    Here's a small clip from it, starting from the entry of the solo voice and ending when the part with piano and orchestra ends.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M42cd5Dox48

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  13. #68
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    Dame Joan Sutherland - Home! Sweet Home, Sydney Opera House farewell performance

    I would give a arm and a leg to be in that audience that night.

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  15. #69
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    Schubert's String Quartet 14 / Death and the Maiden



    Bruckner's eight used to have a similar effect on me, but I guess I got too used to it at this point

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    1. Ludwig van Beethoven, String Quartet Op. 132
    2. Ludwig van Beethoven, 9th Symphony, final choral movement.
    3. Ludwig van Beethoven, 5th Piano Concerto, middle movement, but only when played by Claudio Arrau.
    4. Johannes Brahms, German Requiem, heard live, St. Luke's Orchestra, conducted by Andre Previn, at Carnegie Hall. I was surprised by how intensely beautiful Brahms Requiem is live (to Previn's credit). I hadn't expected to be so overwhelmed.
    5. Johannes Brahms, "Haydn Variations" for orchestra--but only on the Kurt Masur/Leipzig Gewandhaus recording--it's the way Masur handles the flutes at the end that I find so moving (& sets his recording apart from all others I know). (The woodwind section of the Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra in those days was the finest I've ever heard.)
    6. Edward Elgar, "Enigma Variations", heard live, played by the Philadelphia Orchestra, conducted by Sir Neville Marriner, at the Academy of Music in Philly. At the time, I had never heard this music before, and was unexpectedly moved to tears by the "Nimrod" movement.
    7. Samuel Barber, Violin Concerto, the elegiac 2nd movement, but only when played by violinist Elmar Oliveira, with the St. Louis S.O., conducted by Leonard Slatkin. No other violinist I've heard understands the middle movement as well as Oliveira, or plays it as beautifully.
    8. Gustav Mahler, 2nd Symphony, "Urlicht" and the final choral movement
    9. Gustav Mahler, 9th Symphony
    10. Thomas Tallis, "Spem in Alium" (the David Wulstan, Andrew Parrott, Harry Christophers, Mark Brown, & Phillip Cave recordings are the ones that I've been most moved by over the decades)
    11. Thomas Tallis, "Miserere"--when sung by Magnificat, led by Phillip Cave.
    12. William Byrd--his consort song, "Ye Sacred Muses"--composed in elegy to Byrd's teacher, Thomas Tallis--in recordings by the Hilliard Ensemble, and Michael Chance with Fretwork.
    13. Jean Sibelius, 7th Symphony--Paavo Berglund conducting the London Philharmonic live. It isn't just the music that I find so deeply moving on this recording, but also Berglund's vocalizations as he becomes totally swept away by the music making, in tandem with what is to my mind the finest conducted performance of the 7th ever recorded. When I hear Berglund calling out, I'm also saddened by the realization that my favorite Sibelius conductor is no longer with us.
    14, Allan Pettersson--7th Symphony, the final 15 minutes, conducted by Serge Comissiona.
    15. Josquin Desprez--sometimes the sheer beauty of Josquin's Motets gets to me: particularly his "Inviolata, integra, et casta es Maria" (when sung by the Orlando Consort) and "La déploration de Johannes Ockeghem: Nymphes des bois"--an elegy to his teacher, Ockeghem (when sung by the Hilliard Ensemble, Orlando Consort, or Cappella Pratensis). Josquin's Missa Gaudeamus also moves me deeply (when sung by De Labyrintho).
    16. Johannes Ockeghem--"Mort tu as navré de ton dart"--a motet composed in memory of Ockeghem's teacher, the composer Gilles Binchois (when sung by La Main Harmonique or Capilla Flamenca).
    17. Handel Messiah--the "Hallelujah" chorus, in the Paul McCreesh/Gabrieli Consort & Choir recording, as well as "Behold, I tell you a mystery... The Trumpet shall sound", sung by Neal Davies on the McCreesh recording, or Gwynne Howell on the Sir Neville Marriner recording (my two favorite basses in this music).
    18. J.S. Bach--the final "Dona nobis pacem" movement of Bach's Mass in B minor, when it is performed slowly and "with majesty" (not overly fast like too many conductors unwisely choose to do). An example of a conductor that gets the tempo just right is Robert King and The King's Consort (though I'm not necessarily recommending King's recording otherwise).
    19. Richard Wagner--the end of Tristan und Isolde, but only on the Staatskapelle Dresden/Carlos Kleiber recording, with soprano Margaret Price. Others don't effect me as deeply. In those days, the Staatskapelle Dresden played Wagner more in tune & better than any other orchestra of the modern era, in my opinion, and for me, it makes a big difference to how moving the ending is. The digital sound helps too, of course. & Kleiber Jr. was also at his best.
    20. Richard Strauss--Four Last Songs: either Elisabeth Söderström (with Armstrong, or Dorati--though the Dorati is mono) or Elizabeth Schwarzkopf (with Szell) singing the 3rd song, "Beim Schlafengehen". I find the passage where the soprano enters after the violin solo especially moving on their recordings. Also, Arleen Auger singing the 4th song, "Im Abendrot" (with Previn). I am likewise moved by Auger singing "Morgen" by Strauss (with pianist Irwin Gage), in the finest rendition I've heard live or on LP or CD.
    21. Gustav Mahler--from the 5 Rüchkertlieder, "Ich bin der Welt abhanden gekommen" ("I am lost to the world"), sung by Dame Janet Baker, in her classic recording with conductor Sir John Barbirolli, who I think was a great Mahler conductor.
    22. Gabriel Faure--Requiem--In Paradisum--especially on the John Rutter recording.
    Last edited by Josquin13; Dec-10-2017 at 22:02.

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  18. #71
    Senior Member Jacred's Avatar
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    The last movement of Tchaikovsky's 6th Symphony... and also Beethoven's Missa Solemnis, particularly the Kyrie and Sanctus movements. Those get me most consistently.

  19. #72
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    Quote Originally Posted by Josquin13 View Post
    1. Ludwig van Beethoven, String Quartet Op. 132
    2. Ludwig van Beethoven, 9th Symphony, final choral movement.
    3. Ludwig van Beethoven, 5th Piano Concerto, middle movement, but only when played by Claudio Arrau.
    4. Johannes Brahms, German Requiem, heard live, St. Luke's Orchestra, conducted by Andre Previn, at Carnegie Hall. I was surprised by how intensely beautiful Brahms Requiem is live (to Previn's credit). I hadn't expected to be so overwhelmed.
    5. Johannes Brahms, "Haydn Variations" for orchestra--but only on the Kurt Masur/Leipzig Gewandhaus recording--it's the way Masur handles the flutes at the end that I find so moving (& sets his recording apart from all others I know). (The woodwind section of the Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra in those days was the finest I've ever heard.)
    6. Edward Elgar, "Enigma Variations", heard live, played by the Philadelphia Orchestra, conducted by Sir Neville Marriner, at the Academy of Music in Philly. At the time, I had never heard this music before, and was unexpectedly moved to tears by the "Nimrod" movement.
    7. Samuel Barber, Violin Concerto, the elegiac 2nd movement, but only when played by violinist Elmar Oliveira, with the St. Louis S.O., conducted by Leonard Slatkin. No other violinist I've heard understands the middle movement as well as Oliveira, or plays it as beautifully.
    8. Gustav Mahler, 2nd Symphony, "Urlicht" and the final choral movement
    9. Gustav Mahler, 9th Symphony
    10. Thomas Tallis, "Spem in Alium" (the David Wulstan, Andrew Parrott, Harry Christophers, Mark Brown, & Phillip Cave recordings are the ones that I've been most moved by over the decades)
    11. Thomas Tallis, "Miserere"--when sung by Magnificat, led by Phillip Cave.
    12. William Byrd--his consort song, "Ye Sacred Muses"--composed in elegy to Byrd's teacher, Thomas Tallis--in recordings by the Hilliard Ensemble, and Michael Chance with Fretwork.
    13. Jean Sibelius, 7th Symphony--Paavo Berglund conducting the London Philharmonic live. It isn't just the music that I find so deeply moving on this recording, but also Berglund's vocalizations as he becomes totally swept away by the music making, in tandem with what is to my mind the finest conducted performance of the 7th ever recorded. When I hear Berglund calling out, I'm also saddened by the realization that my favorite Sibelius conductor is no longer with us.
    14, Allan Pettersson--7th Symphony, the final 15 minutes, conducted by Serge Comissiona.
    15. Josquin Desprez--sometimes the sheer beauty of Josquin's Motets gets to me: particularly his "Inviolata, integra, et casta es Maria" (when sung by the Orlando Consort) and "La déploration de Johannes Ockeghem: Nymphes des bois"--an elegy to his teacher, Ockeghem (when sung by the Hilliard Ensemble, Orlando Consort, or Cappella Pratensis). Josquin's Missa Gaudeamus also moves me deeply (when sung by De Labyrintho).
    16. Johannes Ockeghem--"Mort tu as navré de ton dart"--a motet composed in memory of Ockeghem's teacher, the composer Gilles Binchois (when sung by La Main Harmonique or Capilla Flamenca).
    17. Handel Messiah--the "Hallelujah" chorus, in the Paul McCreesh/Gabrieli Consort & Choir recording, as well as "Behold, I tell you a mystery... The Trumpet shall sound", sung by Neal Davies on the McCreesh recording, or Gwynne Howell on the Sir Neville Marriner recording (my two favorite basses in this music).
    18. J.S. Bach--the final "Dona nobis pacem" movement of Bach's Mass in B minor, when it is performed slowly and "with majesty" (not overly fast like too many conductors unwisely choose to do). An example of a conductor that gets the tempo just right is Robert King and The King's Consort (though I'm not necessarily recommending King's recording otherwise).
    19. Richard Wagner--the end of Tristan und Isolde, but only on the Staatskapelle Dresden/Carlos Kleiber recording, with soprano Margaret Price. Others don't effect me as deeply. In those days, the Staatskapelle Dresden played Wagner more in tune & better than any other orchestra of the modern era, in my opinion, and for me, it makes a big difference to how moving the ending is. The digital sound helps too, of course. & Kleiber Jr. was also at his best.
    20. Richard Strauss--Four Last Songs: either Elisabeth Söderström (with Armstrong, or Dorati--though the Dorati is mono) or Elizabeth Schwarzkopf (with Szell) singing the 3rd song, "Beim Schlafengehen". I find the passage where the soprano enters after the violin solo especially moving on their recordings. Also, Arleen Auger singing the 4th song, "Im Abendrot" (with Previn). I am likewise moved by Auger singing "Morgen" by Strauss (with pianist Irwin Gage), in the finest rendition I've heard live or on LP or CD.
    21. Gustav Mahler--from the 5 Rüchkertlieder, "Ich bin der Welt abhanden gekommen" ("I am lost to the world"), sung by Dame Janet Baker, in her classic recording with conductor Sir John Barbirolli, who I think was a great Mahler conductor.
    22. Gabriel Faure--Requiem--In Paradisum--especially on the John Rutter recording.
    Is that all? A real bucket of happiness you are

  20. #73
    Senior Member SiegendesLicht's Avatar
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    ^ That was such a brilliant selection.
    ... yet for us will still remain the holy German art... (Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg)
    ***
    God gave all men all earth to love,
    But since our hearts are small,
    Ordained for each one spot should prove
    Beloved over all.
    R. Kipling

  21. #74
    Senior Member LezLee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sloe View Post
    The second movement in Franz Berwald´s fourth symphony because it is so beautiful:



    It was used as theme for a tv serial in the late seventies and early eighties.
    Sloe : I’ve never heard that Berwald before, it’s lovely! Was it British TV?

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  23. #75
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    Haydn Emperor Quartet, 2 mvt - DSCH

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