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Thread: What are you working on right now.

  1. #976
    Senior Member mikeh375's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Allegro Con Brio View Post
    Piano:

    Chopin- Ballade No. 1 (kinda, sorta...)
    Debussy- Suite Bergamasque
    Brahms- 3 Intermezzi Op. 117
    Haydn- Sonata in D Major H. XVI No. 37
    I've done the Debussy and Brahms, but not the Haydn or Chopin. Of the Ballades I've only done the Aflat major and the F minor. I never quite got the last few pages of the F minor up to the tempo I wanted though, perhaps I'll revisit that sometime and get frustrated again.

    Good luck with the first Ballade.
    Last edited by mikeh375; Jan-21-2020 at 09:57.

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  3. #977
    Senior Member Allegro Con Brio's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mikeh375 View Post
    I've done the Debussy and Brahms, but not the Haydn or Chopin. Of the Ballades I've only done the Aflat major and the F minor. I never quite got the last few pages of the F minor up to the tempo I wanted though, perhaps I'll revisit that sometime and get frustrated again.

    Good luck with the first Ballade.
    Thanks! This Ballade was the first classical piece I ever fell in love with, so it's sort of been a pipe dream for me to learn it once I felt I had some semblance of requisite technical skills to tackle it. I actually don't find the infamous Allegro Con Fuoco coda the hardest part of the piece- that would be that central waltz portion with all those crazy LH leaps and RH runs. Lots of rhythmic finagling going on there. It doesn't help that when I play a Chopin waltz, I usually cheat on the LH because I don't care for the octave-plus leaps! I would recommend the Haydn for a nice, relatively simple Classical Era piece with some beautiful tunes. The middle movement is a dark pearl of a sarabande. I honestly prefer Haydn's sonatas by a country mile to Mozart's.

  4. #978
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    I'm new to TalkClassical, hi!

    I'm working on finishing a Mozart sonata - k 457 that I'm performing for people in March. I've never finished an entire sonata, I've historically been a pretty casual pianist, but I've become much more committed in recent years.

    I never loved Mozart until I started playing the sonatas, now I'm completely addicted. It used to be everything I loved to play was dark and romantic (Brahms, Chopin, Debussy), but the tide has turned : ) There's no joy like playing Mozart well.

  5. #979
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    I'm new to TalkClassical, hi!

    I'm working on finishing a Mozart sonata - k 457 that I'm performing for people in March. I've never finished an entire sonata, I've historically been a pretty casual pianist, but I've become much more committed in recent years.

    I never loved Mozart until I started playing the sonatas, now I'm completely addicted. It used to be everything I loved to play was dark and romantic (Brahms, Chopin, Debussy), but the tide has turned : ) There's no joy like playing Mozart well.

  6. #980
    Senior Member Allegro Con Brio's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by marijke View Post
    I'm new to TalkClassical, hi!

    I'm working on finishing a Mozart sonata - k 457 that I'm performing for people in March. I've never finished an entire sonata, I've historically been a pretty casual pianist, but I've become much more committed in recent years.

    I never loved Mozart until I started playing the sonatas, now I'm completely addicted. It used to be everything I loved to play was dark and romantic (Brahms, Chopin, Debussy), but the tide has turned : ) There's no joy like playing Mozart well.
    Welcome to the forums! I totally agree with your last statement- getting the proper touch, voicing, and phrasing in Mozart is arguably harder than playing all the right notes in a Liszt or Rachmaninoff piece. K457 is one of my favorite Mozart sonatas, foreshadowing in many ways Beethoven's Pathetique. If you're in search of another relatively long Mozart piece to learn, I recommend the C Minor Fantasia.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Allegro Con Brio View Post
    Welcome to the forums! I totally agree with your last statement- getting the proper touch, voicing, and phrasing in Mozart is arguably harder than playing all the right notes in a Liszt or Rachmaninoff piece. K457 is one of my favorite Mozart sonatas, foreshadowing in many ways Beethoven's Pathetique. If you're in search of another relatively long Mozart piece to learn, I recommend the C Minor Fantasia.
    I noodle a bit on the fantasia sometimes, it's a good one! I love the andantino.

    Recently I break up practicing 457 with 333... do a little shift to the majors. Or I'll work in some Skriabin to really shift to a different plane of existence.

  8. #982
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    Committing to daily practice was certainly half of the recipe for enjoying Mozart; investing in a nice piano was the other half.

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