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Thread: For love of the Baroque...

  1. #151
    Senior Member Ingélou's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by classical yorkist View Post
    Isn't that the way with so many baroque composers?

    Some of those pieces are played on the fascinating lute-harpsichord.
    http://www.baroquemusic.org/barluthp.html

    A favourite of Bach.
    Ah - that explains it!



    Anyway, Tag has now put up a composer guestbook for Matthias Weckmann so he won't be so obscure, at least for us.
    Mathias Weckmann (1616 - 1674)

    Thanks very much for alerting me to his existence, classical yorkist.
    Last edited by Ingélou; Nov-28-2017 at 13:30.
    ~ Mollie ~
    My fiddle my joy.

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  3. #152
    Sr. Moderator Taggart's Avatar
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    Also for his teacher Heinrich Schütz - Heinrich Schütz (1585 - 1672)
    Last edited by Taggart; Nov-28-2017 at 13:35.
    Music begins where words leave off. Music expresses the inexpressible.

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  5. #153
    Senior Member tdc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by classical yorkist View Post
    I've listened to the Vespers, and some other works, quite a few times this past week or so and my opinion of Monteverdi has been enriched somewhat. I can understand why he's revered quite so much and his life story is quite interesting also. However, he's just not a composer that I'll see myself listening to very often, if at all.
    He definitely stands out as a unique composer within his era, so it makes sense that not all Baroque aficionados will necessarily resonate with his music. My opinion of his work continues to grow, with the opposite effect you've experienced, I continue to want to listen to his music more to the point where between him and J.S. Bach I don't listen to that much Baroque music outside of those two composers anymore.

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  7. #154
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    Quote Originally Posted by Taggart View Post
    Also for his teacher Heinrich Schütz - Heinrich Schütz (1585 - 1672)
    Well, Schutz is a giant of baroque. Well, in my world he is. His Musicalishe Exequien should be required listening in this thread. Ditto his Christmas Story.
    Last edited by classical yorkist; Nov-28-2017 at 13:44.

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  9. #155
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    Quote Originally Posted by tdc View Post
    He definitely stands out as a unique composer within his era, so it makes sense that not all Baroque aficionados will necessarily resonate with his music. My opinion of his work continues to grow, with the opposite effect you've experienced, I continue to want to listen to his music more to the point where between him and J.S. Bach I don't listen to that much Baroque music outside of those two composers anymore.
    I can't really articulate why, it's not that I dislike his music it's more that it just doesn't touch, or move, me like a lot of other baroque composers do. I admire his music but don't love it.

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  11. #156
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ingélou View Post
    ^^^^ I'm listening - it's lovely.
    Twangly rapture - very guitaresque.

    Seems a pity that he's 'incredibly obscure'.
    He (Weckmann) is not that obscure.

    But do not forget his organ works. Cheap and serviceable recordings can be had (played by Friedrich Flamme or Joseph Kelemen), but this one is the best even if a bit more expensive:

    https://www.jpc.de/jpcng/classic/det...n/hnum/6198635
    Last edited by premont; Nov-28-2017 at 14:05.

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  13. #157
    Sr. Moderator Taggart's Avatar
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    Schütz is generally regarded as the most important German composer before Johann Sebastian Bach and often considered to be one of the most important composers of the 17th century. Here's his version of psalm 150:

    Music begins where words leave off. Music expresses the inexpressible.

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  15. #158
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    Suddenly in the last few days I developed an addiction to Vivaldi's one of the late violin concertos RV 386, played by Carmignola posted below. I tried listening to other late violin concertos on his disc, but can't get past this one yet.



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    I have been listening to a glut of baroque music for Advent this morning (I know that strictly it doesn't start until Sunday). I'm going to listen to a lot of Christmas music this month, lots of cantatas and magnificats. I will also endeavour to get it right, religion does not come naturally to me to say the least.
    Last edited by TurnaboutVox; Dec-02-2017 at 14:19. Reason: Predictive text -induced error edited

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  19. #160
    Senior Member Dirge's Avatar
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    A new recording of an old warhorse …

    G. F. HANDEL: Water Music (1717)
    :: Cummings/FestspielOrchester Göttingen [Accent, live ’16]

    I’ve never really had a favorite recording of Handel’s Water Music, but this live one from the 2016 Internationale Händel Festspiele Göttingen might change that. The festival orchestra is populated by musical mercenaries (HAVE OBOE ~ WILL TRAVEL) and moonlighters from many of Europe’s top HIP ensembles, all under the direction of the festival’s music director, Laurence Cummings. The performance is as historically informed and thoughtfully conceived as you’d expect, but it has no academic/musicological axe to grind or overbearing presumption of authenticity. Indeed, the approach is quite well-rounded and catholic, staking out an interpretative middle ground that relies on the quality of the music-making rather than the novelty of it—not that quality and novelty are mutually exclusive, mind you. As it turns out, the quality of the music-making is damn good, with the live festival atmosphere providing that extra spark that live festival atmospheres so often do. Solos are as stylish and characterful as they could be, and the orchestra plays with infectious vitality and joie de vivre throughout, always having a glint in its eye and a spring in its step while still conveying an underlying sense of ceremony and gravitas. All in all, it would be difficult to imagine a more well-rounded account, one that better balances the many and varied aspects of the music than this one. The recorded sound is clear and close yet natural, with good balances and a nice amount of air/atmosphere—it’s quite vivid.

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  21. #161
    Senior Member Tallisman's Avatar
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    I've lost touch with the Baroque recently. Still regularly listen to the WTC, but apart from that, it's just not interesting me at the moment in the same way as later music

    I'm going to stick on the Monteverdi Vespers and see if that has any effect.
    Last edited by Tallisman; Dec-03-2017 at 12:18.

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  23. #162
    Senior Member Ingélou's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dirge View Post
    A new recording of an old warhorse …

    G. F. HANDEL: Water Music (1717)
    :: Cummings/FestspielOrchester Göttingen [Accent, live ’16]

    I’ve never really had a favorite recording of Handel’s Water Music, but this live one from the 2016 Internationale Händel Festspiele Göttingen might change that. The festival orchestra is populated by musical mercenaries (HAVE OBOE ~ WILL TRAVEL) and moonlighters from many of Europe’s top HIP ensembles, all under the direction of the festival’s music director, Laurence Cummings. The performance is as historically informed and thoughtfully conceived as you’d expect, but it has no academic/musicological axe to grind or overbearing presumption of authenticity. Indeed, the approach is quite well-rounded and catholic, staking out an interpretative middle ground that relies on the quality of the music-making rather than the novelty of it—not that quality and novelty are mutually exclusive, mind you. As it turns out, the quality of the music-making is damn good, with the live festival atmosphere providing that extra spark that live festival atmospheres so often do. Solos are as stylish and characterful as they could be, and the orchestra plays with infectious vitality and joie de vivre throughout, always having a glint in its eye and a spring in its step while still conveying an underlying sense of ceremony and gravitas. All in all, it would be difficult to imagine a more well-rounded account, one that better balances the many and varied aspects of the music than this one. The recorded sound is clear and close yet natural, with good balances and a nice amount of air/atmosphere—it’s quite vivid.
    What a brilliant review - so detailed & interesting!

    Quote Originally Posted by Tallisman View Post
    I've lost touch with the Baroque recently. Still regularly listen to the WTC, but apart from that, it's just not interesting me at the moment in the same way as later music

    I'm going to stick on the Monteverdi Vespers and see if that has any effect.
    Liking Baroque Music is not compulsory!
    I hope you enjoy your Monteverdi - if not, have a break, and love the music you're with.
    ~ Mollie ~
    My fiddle my joy.

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  25. #163
    Senior Member Ingélou's Avatar
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    My latest musical love affair is with William McGibbon (?1690-1756).
    I've just come on to his ravishing minuet in 'Thistle & Minuet', the music book that I'm working through with my HIP fiddle teacher. Unfortunately very little is known about him, and there isn't much to choose from on YouTube - but there's this:



    As I've posted elsewhere, at the moment I'm very worried about my 97-year-old mother, currently in hospital with pneumonia and her dementia much exacerbated.

    It's good to know that in the middle of turmoil and sadness there will always be Scottish Baroque!

    thistle heraldry.gif
    Last edited by Ingélou; Dec-04-2017 at 14:24.
    ~ Mollie ~
    My fiddle my joy.

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  27. #164
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ingélou View Post
    My latest musical love affair is with William McGibbon (1696-1756).
    I've just come on to his ravishing minuet in 'Thistle & Minuet', the music book that I'm working through with my HIP fiddle teacher. Unfortunately very little is known about him, and there isn't much to choose from on YouTube - but there's this:



    As I've posted elsewhere, at the moment I'm very worried about my 97-year-old mother, currently in hospital with pneumonia and her dementia much exacerbated.

    It's good to know that in the middle of turmoil and sadness there will always be Scottish Baroque!

    thistle heraldry.gif
    Very sorry to hear about your troubling family situation (I have experience certificate of dementia in my family so appreciate your worries), hopefully you will find a modicum of solace in baroque music.

    I've never heard of the composer you linked, I will listen.

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  29. #165
    Senior Member Ingélou's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by classical yorkist View Post
    Very sorry to hear about your troubling family situation (I have experience certificate of dementia in my family so appreciate your worries), hopefully you will find a modicum of solace in baroque music.

    I've never heard of the composer you linked, I will listen.
    Thank you very much, classical yorkist, for your kind wishes.

    My favourite music - as a folkie - is where Scottish traditional music meets the baroque. 'Thistle and minuet' is full of folk songs arranged for sheet music by the baroque violinists of eighteenth-century Scotland, as well as some lovely art arrangements. James Oswald and The Earl of Kellie are probably the best known Scottish baroque composers of this type of music.

    William McGibbon is very obscure and best known, probably, for bits and pieces set in the classical violin grade exams, and also for his settings of Scottish songs. This is nice:



    The whole subject of 'the golden age of Scottish fiddle music' is dealt with in this video lecture. I find it interesting, but the sound quality is very poor.

    Last edited by Ingélou; Dec-04-2017 at 11:35.
    ~ Mollie ~
    My fiddle my joy.

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