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Thread: For love of the Baroque...

  1. #256
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    I love Baroque music too, I am so glad that so many people are also listening to Baroque music. Friends around me (most of them plays piano) said Baroque music is boring, no one appreciate Baroque music as I do.

    There's so much to explore in Baroque period, yet I only have a pair of eyes and ears.

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  3. #257
    Senior Member Ingélou's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Taggart View Post
    The only other thing on You Tube is



    Guest book - Gregorio Allegri 1582 - 1652
    I am listening to this now. It is heavenly.
    Honestly, I think I've never heard such beautiful singing.
    Allegri turns out to be at least a Two Hit Wonder.

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    PS - Thanks to Josquin13 on the composer guestbook, Taggart was able to track down the cd that this comes from, and we've ordered it.
    Something lovely to look forward to on a rainy day by the seaside...
    Last edited by Ingélou; Feb-20-2018 at 19:39.
    ~ Mollie ~
    My fiddle my joy.

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  5. #258
    Member EchoEcho's Avatar
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    I continue to be interested in this idea of trying to create representative playlists for a particular area and era of music – trying to capture the major highlights in sacred, courtly, public, and chamber music developments in a given country over a given period. I find it a good way to try to get my head around what was happening.

    I find the 1600s to be a particularly interesting century. It seems to represent a transition from the rather dull (for me) traditions of voice-only sacred polyphonic chant, to a period of much greater musical variety, instrumental virtuosity, and emotional expressiveness. The century also sets the stage for the "giants" of the early 1700s – Bach, Vivaldi, Telemann, Handel, et al. – and the subsequent rise of classicism. The birth of the modern, if you will.

    I started trying to create such playlists above, with an attempt to traverse early baroque in Italy (first half of 1600s), France, and Spain. In what follows, I will try to hit some highlights of early English baroque music through a selection of ten albums.

    A confession: I already listened to these over the past few days and curated the overall list as best I could. So I'm not making it up as I go along, discovering things as I go. But hopefully, I will be able to capture at least some of my spontaneous reactions in the notes for each album.

    17th Century English Baroque.... Here we go....
    Last edited by EchoEcho; Feb-20-2018 at 20:18.

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  7. #259
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    First stop:
    Stile Antico The Phoenix Rising


    a capella religious music from the 1500s and early 1600s
    targeted at recusant Catholics
    famous names represented
    Tallis, Byrd, Gibbons, Taverner, White
    in some ways traditional polyphony
    but the voices seem more natural and independent than say Victoria's polished pieces
    good music, but not for repeat listening
    rating: 2.5 stars (ie good but...)

    ––––--
    To me this disc is pretty representative of pre-Baroque music. At least insofar as it has been transmitted to us. I strongly suspect that there was a much broader and more diverse base of musical traditions, most of which were lost because they weren't transcribed for posterity. With that caveat, we will focus on what we have.
    Last edited by EchoEcho; Feb-20-2018 at 19:53.

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  9. #260
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    Second disc:
    Dowland: The Second Booke of Ayres – The Schoole of Night



    a little Dowland goes a long way with me
    a little too affected and monotonous for extended listening
    still, an interesting example of guy-with-a-guitar music
    with more angst than Morrissey
    ironically in real life he was said to be a cheerful person
    interesting stuff but I think not really representative of the period – sui generis ?
    but note the echoes in Dido and Aeneas below
    rating: 2.5 stars

    ––––-
    If this music appeared in Italy, it might have been labeled "monody". To me it is a pretty natural and timeless form of music-making. Dowland's particular form of unrelenting angst is distinctive but probably not unique. He reminds me Chris Isaac more than Morrissey (for those of you who are up on their 90s alternative music references).

    I was a bit blown away to hear that same style of concentrated angst used almost a century later by Purcell in Dido's arias though!
    Last edited by EchoEcho; Feb-20-2018 at 19:55.

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  11. #261
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    This next one is a bit of a shocker:
    The Cries of London, Paul Hillier, Theatre of Voices and Fretwork



    really surprising stuff
    you gotta hear it to believe it
    and even then you won't believe it is authentic
    for that you have to read the liner notes
    at first the strongest reaction may well be shock
    but some tracks really seem to display great beauty
    though other tracks seem a little pedestrian
    something everyone should hear at least once !!
    rating: 4 stars

    ––––-
    Let me just reiterate – this is essential listening!

    It also gives us a glimpse of the broad base of music which existed amongst the general public at the time. Here we have a musical expression of the lively London street scene, contemporaneous with Shakespeare and his Globe Theatre.
    Last edited by EchoEcho; Feb-20-2018 at 20:03.

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  13. #262
    Senior Member Ingélou's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by EchoEcho View Post
    This next one is a bit of a shocker:
    The Cries of London, Paul Hillier, Theatre of Voices and Fretwork



    really surprising stuff
    you gotta hear it to believe it
    and even then you won't believe it is authentic
    for that you have to read the liner notes
    at first the strongest reaction may well be shock
    but some tracks really seem to display great beauty
    though other tracks seem a little pedestrian
    something everyone should hear at least once !!
    rating: 4 stars

    ––––-
    Let me just reiterate – this is essential listening!

    It also gives us a glimpse of the broad base of music which existed amongst the general public at the time. Here we have a musical expression of the lively London street scene, contemporaneous with Shakespeare and his Globe Theatre.
    Lovely to see you posting again here, EchoEcho.

    Are these the Orlando Gibbons 'cries'?

    A link here gives the lyrics.
    http://www.orlandogibbons.com/the-cries-of-london/
    Some of them might well surprise those who are not well-versed in the preoccupations of Shakespearean comedy. But I've been there, done that & got the teeshirt!

    Last year John & I went to a music school at Abbotsford where we had a concert among ourselves, and one gifted teenage boy performed an excerpt from the Cries with a Dutch young woman also attending the school - (not the ruder cries! ) - and it was very well done (both had fab voices) and enjoyable.

    Thanks for reminding me.

    Looking forward to Disc Number Four...
    Last edited by Ingélou; Feb-20-2018 at 20:44.
    ~ Mollie ~
    My fiddle my joy.

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  15. #263
    Sr. Moderator Taggart's Avatar
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    Interesting that Gibbons uses an "In Nomine" for the cries with the theme in the viol parts except when the voice carries the melody. So the music may not be as popular as one might think.
    Last edited by Taggart; Feb-20-2018 at 20:37.
    Music begins where words leave off. Music expresses the inexpressible.

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  17. #264
    Senior Member Jacck's Avatar
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    J. Desprez - Missa de Beata Virgine

    this is probably pre-Baroque, but I like it

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  19. #265
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ingélou View Post
    Are these the Orlando Gibbons 'cries'?
    Tracks 1, 2, 4, and 6 seem to be proper "cries" -- one each from Gibbons, Cobbold, Weelkes, and Dering, respectively. Track 13 is listed as a "country cry", by Dering.

    Occassionally bawdy, but also interesting from a historical perspective – it's nice to know what you could buy on the streets in London 400 years ago.

    Tracks 8, 9, and 10 are essentially folk songs, from Michael East (8&9) and Ravenscroft (10).

    Tracks 3, 5, and 7 are purely instrumental -- from Gibbons (3&7) and Dering (5).
    Last edited by EchoEcho; Feb-21-2018 at 04:47.

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  21. #266
    Senior Member Jacck's Avatar
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    Taggart, you found only 2 works by Allegri on youtube? I found one more in addition to Miserere and Misa Vidi Turbam Magnam
    Gregorio Allegri: “Opere Inedite dai Manoscritti della Collectio Altaemps”
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mezfM2KtdNA

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  23. #267
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    Quote Originally Posted by Taggart View Post
    Interesting that Gibbons uses an "In Nomine" for the cries with the theme in the viol parts except when the voice carries the melody. So the music may not be as popular as one might think.

    I don't think I could recognize an "In Nomine" yet. Maybe some day....

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  25. #268
    Senior Member Ingélou's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by EchoEcho View Post
    I don't think I could recognize an "In Nomine" yet. Maybe some day....
    Better than me. I probably wouldn't recognise an In Nomine if it jumped up and bit me!

    (Shades of my early married life, when my dear husband kept me up till after midnight to tell me about 'The Mass of the Catechumens'! ... and I've forgotten...)
    Last edited by Ingélou; Feb-20-2018 at 21:33.
    ~ Mollie ~
    My fiddle my joy.

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  27. #269
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    Quote Originally Posted by EchoEcho View Post
    This next one is a bit of a shocker:
    The Cries of London, Paul Hillier, Theatre of Voices and Fretwork



    really surprising stuff
    you gotta hear it to believe it
    and even then you won't believe it is authentic
    for that you have to read the liner notes
    at first the strongest reaction may well be shock
    but some tracks really seem to display great beauty
    though other tracks seem a little pedestrian
    something everyone should hear at least once !!
    rating: 4 stars

    ––––-
    Let me just reiterate – this is essential listening!

    It also gives us a glimpse of the broad base of music which existed amongst the general public at the time. Here we have a musical expression of the lively London street scene, contemporaneous with Shakespeare and his Globe Theatre.
    This is exactly how I feel about it.

    I think with Gibbons we're pretty far from the baroque, by the way.

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  29. #270
    Sr. Moderator Taggart's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jacck View Post
    Taggart, you found only 2 works by Allegri on youtube? I found one more in addition to Miserere and Misa Vidi Turbam Magnam
    Gregorio Allegri: “Opere Inedite dai Manoscritti della Collectio Altaemps”
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mezfM2KtdNA
    Nice! Shame about the weird movie in the background. The CD it's from is

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Allegri-Ine...ble%2C+Bigotti

    Music begins where words leave off. Music expresses the inexpressible.

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