Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: Is there a difference between a staccato pluck, and a non staccato pluck?

  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    577
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Is there a difference between a staccato pluck, and a non staccato pluck?

    I'm a composer, and I've been wondering this lately. You see it sometimes on classical scores, and sometimes you don't. So that's my question, does it make that much of a difference?

  2. #2
    Member vsm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Posts
    60
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I guess this is referring to stringed instruments such as guitars and such, not strings like violin, cello, etc... if so, I don't think there is any difference since the effect is the same anyway (on guitars that's the only way to do a staccato as far as I know)
    Fabrizio Ferrari, supervisor
    Virtual Sheet Music
    https://www.virtualsheetmusic.com

  3. #3
    Senior Member tdc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    6,861
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I think there is a difference. It is possible to pluck a series of notes (or even a single note) on stringed instruments such as guitar or violin in a staccato or legato manner. To play staccato the sound of each note is stopped by placing a finger on the resonating string shortly after plucking it as opposed to letting the notes ring out freely.
    Last edited by tdc; Oct-31-2017 at 22:43.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Dan Ante's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    NZ
    Posts
    862
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I am surprised the word 'pluck' is used by a composer/musician why not Pizzicato.

  5. #5
    Member vsm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Posts
    60
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tdc View Post
    I think there is a difference. It is possible to pluck a series of notes (or even a single note) on stringed instruments such as guitar or violin in a staccato or legato manner. To play staccato the sound of each note is stopped by placing a finger on the resonating string shortly after plucking it as opposed to letting the notes ring out freely.
    You might be right, I am a violinist and that usually is not part of our technique, that's why I think that's related to guitars.
    Last edited by vsm; Nov-01-2017 at 00:52.
    Fabrizio Ferrari, supervisor
    Virtual Sheet Music
    https://www.virtualsheetmusic.com

  6. #6
    Member vsm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Posts
    60
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Ante View Post
    I am surprised the word 'pluck' is used by a composer/musician why not Pizzicato.
    Yes, that's also why I think the term "pluck" is related to guitars and such and not violin, viola, cello, etc... for strings we use the term "pizzicato" and there is just one single effect coming out from there (which is "pizzicato")
    Fabrizio Ferrari, supervisor
    Virtual Sheet Music
    https://www.virtualsheetmusic.com

  7. Likes Larkenfield liked this post
  8. #7
    Senior Member Dan Ante's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    NZ
    Posts
    862
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I did a google search for staccato pluck, amazing what you can find init.

    https://www.google.co.nz/search?hl=e...60.n4rvObxSky4


    staccato pluck.JPG

  9. Likes vsm liked this post
  10. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    577
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by vsm View Post
    Yes, that's also why I think the term "pluck" is related to guitars and such and not violin, viola, cello, etc... for strings we use the term "pizzicato" and there is just one single effect coming out from there (which is "pizzicato")
    Pluck is easier to type. .

  11. #9
    Senior Member Dan Ante's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    NZ
    Posts
    862
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Manok View Post
    Pluck is easier to type. .
    Then do what composers do and write pizz.

  12. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Posts
    391
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I'm a guitarist, and what tdc said is absolutely true. Strings can be "plucked" and you still can connect the tones to play legato.

    I will usually dampen with my left hand a bit as well as returning my right hand finger to the string to get a real strong staccato.

    in guitar scores I often see a small dot above or below the note to indicate a very strong and detached staccato. I honestly do not see "pizz" in guitar music very often because we don't use a bow. I think pizzicato is sort of our default articulation, so they just leave it out.

  13. Likes Dan Ante, Larkenfield liked this post

Similar Threads

  1. What is the difference??
    By Mahler Maniac in forum Classical Music Discussion
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: Oct-01-2006, 02:20
  2. Any difference in sound?
    By DW in forum Keyboard Instruments
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: Jan-24-2005, 11:05

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •