Page 2 of 38 FirstFirst 12345612 ... LastLast
Results 16 to 30 of 558

Thread: Exploring Contemporary Composers

  1. #16
    Junior Member Uxbal's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Posts
    14
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    1. György Kurtág
    2. Michael Hersch
    3. Vyacheslav Artyomov

  2. #17
    Senior Member Melvin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Michigan, Detroit
    Posts
    247
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Blancrocher View Post


    Gubaidulina, Triple Concerto (2016)

    Program Notes:

    https://www.carnegiehall.org/ch/popu...pn=15032387802
    (Here are the program notes I was thinking of. I wasn't able to find them at first glance on the carnigie hall webpage. A very interesting theology with which to approach writing a TrippleKonzert)

    "When the title of a work of art reflects the work's essence, the title becomes a symbol, i.e., the distillation of the meanings contained in its depth. So while I was composing this work, the word Tripelkonzert ("triple concerto") became for me such a symbol, a symbol for the number three, of "three-ness." This is reflected not only in the number of performers—there are three soloists standing in front of the orchestra—but also in the tripartite structure of the form and in the use of simple triads in the texture of the piece.

    However, most essential is the meaning of the three basic melodic-chordal structures, which are closely linked with the three most important qualities of the sound material: the force of intervallic attraction, the force of intervallic repulsion, and the force generating this contrast.

    Thus the tree of the overtone series grows, as it were, out of the cluster sounding from the bayan, which represents the essence, the nature of sound. And in it we notice a gradual contraction of the intervals between the respective partials. The force of attraction of the neighboring partials increases as we gradually move from the first overtone to the following partials. This is the initium of the work, to which the remaining texture reacts. At the very end, a chord forms a response that consists of slowly enlarging intervals. In this way, the piece could be regarded as a revelation of three forces: the expansion of widening intervals, the contraction of narrowing intervals, and the reaction to this cosmological drama."


    Thanks for bring this one to our attention Blancrocher
    Last edited by Melvin; Dec-22-2017 at 05:52.

  3. #18
    Senior Member Phil loves classical's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Location
    Ford Nation
    Posts
    4,131
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tulse View Post
    Thanks for sharing. In the second part it shows her mysticism with the tree illustration the most interestingly. I also never heard the concept of consonant and dissonant rhythms. Reading on Wikipedia and other stuff, she uses the fibonacci sequence and golden ratio, and chromaticism, polytonal, and microtonality. She states explicity she doesn’t want to invent a new harmonic language, but express more in rhythms (the leaves of her tree illustration).

    Found the following:

    “Every composition is an enormous labor for me," Gubaidulina told Karen Campbell of the Christian Science Monitor. At the beginning, she said, she hears in her head "a vertical sound of colorful, moving, clashing chords, completely mixed up and jumbled. It is wonderful and beautiful, but it isn't real. My job is to turn that vertical sound into a horizontal line. Those two lines, horizontal and vertical, make a cross, and I think about that when I compose." That statement might serve as a kind of compositional credo for Gubaidulina, whose work has successfully merged spiritual influences with extremely original techniques. That combination hampered Gubaidulina's early career, when the repression of creative artists by the Soviet state was at its height, but in the eclectic 1980s and 1990s she became one of the hottest new composers on the international classical scene.

    She puts her religious ferver into her music, and I sense it from listening to it, though her pointing to the divine, makes me wonder if it is just a fanciful perspective.

    One site called her music postmodern, but it has a clear grand narrative to it, which disqualifies it as such in my mind.
    Last edited by Phil loves classical; Dec-22-2017 at 06:30.
    "Forgive me, Majesty. I'm a vulgar man. But I assure you, my music is not.“ Mozart

  4. Likes N/A liked this post
  5. #19
    Senior Member 20centrfuge's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Utah, USA
    Posts
    1,183
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    28

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Art Rock View Post
    Gubaidulina is my favourite living composer, I have over 30 CD's of her works.

    My first encounter of her music was courtesy of the Kronos Quartet. Here is her fascinating 4th string quartet from 1993:

    Youtube link part 1
    Youtube link part 2
    Since you’ve listened to far more of her works than I have, I would like for you to say what works are your favorites.
    Last edited by 20centrfuge; Dec-22-2017 at 15:51.

  6. #20
    Senior Member Art Rock's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Kampen (NL)
    Posts
    16,395
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I will be posting my favourites with YT links in this thread, but not all at once.
    Allüberall und ewig blauen licht die Fernen! Ewig ... ewig ...

  7. Likes Melvin liked this post
  8. #21
    Senior Member Art Rock's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Kampen (NL)
    Posts
    16,395
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    The first complete Gubaidulina CD I bought includes Jetzt immer Schnee, which has remained a clear favourite for me. Unfortunately I can't find it on YouTube.

    From her varied repertoire, I really like the various concertos, including less frequently used concertante instrument(s) like the bayan, viola, or percussion.

    Here is her concerto "Glorious percussion" for percussion ensemble and orchestra.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P_S1u5WYxz4
    Allüberall und ewig blauen licht die Fernen! Ewig ... ewig ...

  9. Likes schigolch, Blancrocher, N/A and 1 others liked this post
  10. #22
    Senior Member Kjetil Heggelund's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    Jevnaker, Norway
    Posts
    2,773
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Sikorski is also her publisher. There's even more chamber music and concertos This thread has so far given me 100 times new things to check out. I wish that all the information coming in, can be categorized so we can get an easy overview or perspective on the composer. I'm interested in different composition techniques she uses and how to describe her music. I've always liked what I've heard, but what did I really hear?

  11. #23
    Senior Member Melvin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Michigan, Detroit
    Posts
    247
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    String Quartet no. 4 is amazing.

  12. Likes Art Rock, Portamento liked this post
  13. #24
    Senior Member Art Rock's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Kampen (NL)
    Posts
    16,395
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Melvin View Post
    String Quartet no. 4 is amazing.


    The first three are worth exploring as well.
    Allüberall und ewig blauen licht die Fernen! Ewig ... ewig ...

  14. #25
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Posts
    2,580
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    My favorite Gubaidulina work is her haunting Viola Concerto, played to perfection by Yuri Bashmet.

    I will re-listen to a few things and get back.
    Last edited by Portamento; Dec-22-2017 at 16:27.

  15. Likes schigolch, arpeggio, musicrom liked this post
  16. #26
    Senior Member Blancrocher's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    6,544
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    An interesting aside about the background of the composition of the Bassoon Concerto (mentioned upthread):

    One day in 1973, Sofia Gubaidulina was attacked in the lift of her Moscow apartment building. The man started to strangle her. The composer thought grimly that this was the end and, if so, her chief regret was that she would never complete the bassoon concerto on which she'd been working. "I'm not afraid of death but of violence," she told her biographer later. She got exasperated with her attacker. "Why so slow?" she asked. Amazingly, the words scared him off.
    https://www.theguardian.com/music/20...ained-melodies

    That's the opening hook of a quite entertaining Guardian article about Gubaidulina.
    Last edited by Blancrocher; Dec-22-2017 at 16:55.

  17. Likes Melvin liked this post
  18. #27
    Tulse
    Guest

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by schigolch View Post
    Sofia Gubaidulina is of course one of the leading composers of the 20th century, and she has also quite a few excellent works in the 21st.

    I remember a presentation we did some twenty five years ago, about Russian female composers, when a friend was introducing Gubaidulina, while I focused on my favorite, Galina Ustvólskaya. It was a success, especially the Gubaidulina part.


    Of her many works, the one that is more attractive to me is "Hour of the Soul". It was written in the 1970s, for mezzo and orchestra, based on Marina Tsvetaeva's poem.

    That was great Schigolch thank you.

    I have come across a translation of the poem:

    In the inmost hour of the soul,
    In the inmost one-of the night ...
    (The gigantic stride of the soul,
    Of the soul in the night)

    That hour, soul, reign
    Over the worlds you desire.
    To rule is the lot of the soul:
    Soul, reign.

    Cover the lips with rust; snow lightly
    Upon the lashes ...
    (The Atlantic sigh of the soul,
    Of the soul in the night. .. )

    That hour, soul, darken
    The eyes in which you will rise
    Like a Vega ... make bitter
    The sweetest fruit, soul.

    Make bitter: darken:
    Grow: reign.

    (1923)


    The theme seems to align quite closely with Gubaidulina's mysticism. Perhaps Tsvetaeva was a significant influence on the composer?

  19. Likes schigolch liked this post
  20. #28
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Madrid, Spain
    Posts
    4,464
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I think she was, and Gubaidulina is very fond of her poetry. After all, she also wrote "In Tribute to Marina Tsvetaeva", a choral piece on poems by Tsvetaeva.

  21. Likes N/A liked this post
  22. #29
    Senior Member Melvin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Michigan, Detroit
    Posts
    247
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    "Stunde der Seele" is an amazing work as well. All of her music I've heard so far is very connectable, polished... modernist yet deeply spiritual. I've never listened to much of this composer before now. But the name has for a while been one on the continually growing list of hundreds of composers I've been planning to get around to hearing at some point. That's why I like this project, it will give some structure to my otherwise sporadic listening, and it is much fun.

  23. #30
    Banned
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Location
    Les Pays-Bas
    Posts
    3,214
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    2

    Default

    I see this has started moving along. I only had a brief listen to the first piece posted. I've not had much time today. I'm less familiar with Gubaidulina than some others here, so I'm mostly listening, reading and learning at this point.

Page 2 of 38 FirstFirst 12345612 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Discussion for "Exploring Contemporary Composers"
    By mmsbls in forum Classical Music Discussion
    Replies: 249
    Last Post: Oct-13-2019, 11:09
  2. Contemporary organists, contemporary music
    By KenOC in forum Solo & Chamber Music
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: Jan-04-2018, 05:45
  3. Exploring contemporary composers: Let’s do it.
    By KenOC in forum Classical Music Discussion
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: Dec-21-2017, 08:25
  4. Exploring the 555 Scarlatti Sonatas
    By Air in forum Solo & Chamber Music
    Replies: 163
    Last Post: Sep-24-2017, 05:51
  5. Contemporary Composers
    By shsherm in forum Composer Guestbooks
    Replies: 68
    Last Post: Jan-03-2015, 19:04

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •