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Thread: Exploring Contemporary Composers

  1. #106
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    Quote Originally Posted by PeterFromLA View Post
    She has written many major pieces that are sure to join the repertoire. These are my recommendations for those interested in exploring her oeuvre:

    Offertorium, a violin concerto that is based on Bach's Musical Offering, filtered through Webern. It is the piece that brought her to wide exposure in the West. The DG recording, with Kremer, is the one that made the initial splash.

    In Croce, mentioned above, is a luminous meditation on the possibilities of combining organ and cello. It goes on, perhaps longer than it should, but it makes for a strangely affecting reverie.

    Canticle of the Sun, written for Rostropovich, it is scored for cello, chamber choir, and percussion ensemble. This is an almost hallucinatory piece, offering a wonderful example of the composer's ability to conjure inner worlds.

    In Tempus Praesens, the second violin concerto, this one written for Anne-Sophie Mutter. Lyrical and beautiful, a good intro to the composer.

    Introitus, her piano concerto. A relatively early work (though still mature), it is a solemn, spiritual work, at times reminiscent of pealing church bells.

    Glorious Percussion, I second the recommendation of this work made in the preceding posts.

    I should add that all of Gubaidulina's mature pieces (like Messiaen's) contain references to her religious beliefs (Russian Orthodox). It is not essential to know this, however, to appreciate how they function as music.
    Om my word. Thank you OP of this thread...! - I have just discovered Canticle of The Sun. Couldn't describe it better than Peter from LA does here. I find this piece mesmerising and unlike anything else I own. Rostropovich's playing is...there is no adjective. Roll on my exploration of Gubaidulina.

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  3. #107
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    I have this, my only CD by Gubaidulina.

    Canticle of the Sun
    The Lyre of Orpheus

    Kremerata Baltica

    02680EA7-6A17-4343-BC4D-09D0CA3D2061.jpeg
    Last edited by dogen; Jan-25-2018 at 10:46.

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  5. #108
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    "Efebo con radio" (Boy With A Radio), was written in 1981, for orchestra and contralto, and is a very personal piece. Sciarrino tried to recreate part of his own childhood, when he spend many afternoons sitting in front a radio, listening to the programs. He is playing with the orchestra to reproduce the sounds of the radio, and the voice interacting somehow with the sounds. It's not quintessential Sciarrino, but very interesting:


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    Senior Member Melvin's Avatar
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    Over the past few days I've been listening to Sciarrino's vocal pieces like "Studi per l'intonazione del mare", "Infinito Nero", "Vanitas", and "Efebo con Radio". It's a nice body of work, I've been enjoying it.

    His piano music is also good. His set of Piano Sonatas are enjoyable. They're each only about 10 minutes long.

    No. 1 (1976)
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XDPo1Ksm56U
    No. 2 (1983)
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qkcb87CSy-Y
    No. 3 (1987)
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GfJFy5YOD8w
    No. 4 (1992)
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ln4ay8mvrHA

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    Quote Originally Posted by schigolch View Post
    The flute is one of Sciarrino's favorite intruments. He has written a great deal of material, looking to understand all the possibilities of a flute, with the use of extended techniques, as well as his usual partnership with silence. It's quite interesting to explore that material, especially for lovers of the flute.

    Salvatore Sciarrino has said of flautist Mario Caroli that 'he is the Paganini of the flute'. "Morte tamburo" is a brief piece, written for Caroli back in 1999.
    Flute seems to accentuates Sciarrino's characteristic style best. I enjoyed Caroli's recordings (L'opera per flauto, Vol. 1 & 2). Interesting contrast between faint shivering (sounding like bird warbling) and sudden burst of breath, which reminds me of shakuhachi. Sometimes it sounds like speaking.


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  11. #111
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  12. #112
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    Sciarrino has also explored the string quartet during his long career. He has written nine full pieces in that genre, along with the "Sei quartetti brevi". While all of them are very interesting, and remarkably similar in style, my favorite is nº7, written in 1999 and that always haunts back to me, everytime I listen to it:


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  14. #113
    Senior Member Melvin's Avatar
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    I finally broke into some Sciarrino string quartets the other day, good stuff.

    I'm surprised I'm listening to so many vocal works. I usually avoid them, but for this thread I'll try to go out of my comfortable depth and end up liking things I didn't expect to.

    I listened to "Aspern Suite" this morning and found it to be incredibly good, with my coffee.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ydBA...kLHeXDe47PBSbH
    Last edited by Melvin; Feb-01-2018 at 01:18.

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    Among Sciarrino's works for orchestra, one of my favorites is "I fuochi oltre la ragione", written in 1997 and dedicated to Riccardo Chailly. It's typical Sciarrino, with his obsession for sound and silence, for building tension though timbre, and with his usual subtlety. Also, the youtube below is a great performance:


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  18. #115
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    Composer: Frederic Rzewski (1938-)

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  20. #116
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    I think his most well known work is

    The people united will never be defeated!
    36 variations on a Chilean folk song.

    I have the performance by Ole Kiilerich, piano.

    It was recommended to me early on TC (by Alypius) and I enjoyed it very much then and still do.

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    The People United ... is a wonderful piece. I also first heard it due to recommendations at TC.

    Rzewski wrote a work for Solo Piano and Ensemble, Hard Cuts. I heard it awhile ago and revisited it finding that I liked it even more than before. Apparently Rzewski wrote just the melodic lines and did not specify the instrumentation of the ensemble. The link above is for orchestra, but I have listened to a Naxos recording with a chamber ensemble.

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    In the last years, I have had quite some fun with his "Nanosonatas":

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aUDJ4tozgks

  25. #119
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    Last name is pronounched "Chevsky," in case anyone is wondering.

    Saw him play "The People United" variations, and perform the narrator role in the work, "Coming Together." He was wonderfully animated and impassioned in both. Ensemble was the SF Contemporary Music Players. I recommend also Coming Together's pendant, "Attica."

    Rzewski was a piano virtuoso in his own right. He gave many of the earliest performances of Stockhausen's Klavierstucken. He's an interesting figure in that he bridges Darmstadt era modernism and American minimalism. He was one of those Rome Fellows back in the 1950s, which seems to account for his European connections.

    The Dance Theater of Harlem recently staged Coming Together. It must have been something.

    Last edited by PeterFromLA; Feb-04-2018 at 21:25.

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  27. #120
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    Quote Originally Posted by dogen View Post
    I think his most well known work is

    The people united will never be defeated!
    36 variations on a Chilean folk song.

    I have the performance by Ole Kiilerich, piano.

    It was recommended to me early on TC (by Alypius) and I enjoyed it very much then and still do.
    What a hero, a deserved tribute to the Chileans and socialists everywhere!

    Here is the composer playing the work:

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