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Thread: Current Listening Vol V

  1. #46936
    Senior Member pianozach's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Manxfeeder View Post
    Bruckner, Symphony No. 8


    Vienna Philharmonic, 1944. Is it one of the greatest recordings of the 8th? All I know is, I listened to this while I got a root canal, and I felt no pain.

    I've passively listened to Bruckner's 8th a few times over the past week, and find it difficult to 'get into'. There's some beautiful passages and some impressive drama, but my major complaint is the dynamic range (read 'volume').

    It often is so quiet I have to turn it up considerably to hear anything at all, and then I'm having to turn it down when he hits the fff sections, only to have it vanish when again it reaches a ppp section, interrupting my 'enjoyment' by wondering instead if I had accidentally turned the player off.

    Again, it's the 1971 Cellibidache recording.

    Is there, perhaps, a brickwalled release somewhere?


    I'm now on to my Gunter Wand/Cologne Radio Symphony Orchestra recording of Bruckner Symphony 5 & 4.

    I'm liking the 1st movement of Symphony No. 5 a great deal so far.

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  3. #46937
    Senior Member Bourdon's Avatar
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    Goebaidoelina

    Jetzt Immer Schnee

    Perception


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    Senior Member Kjetil Heggelund's Avatar
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    Here are two pretty famous Norwegian guys talking about music. Has English subtitles! Get enlightened

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    Senior Member Joe B's Avatar
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    Earlier today:



    Current listening - Stephen Layton leading Polyphony in choral works by Sir Karl Jenkins:

    I love music. I want music. I need music.

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    Defining Dahl: The Music of Ingolf DahlThe New World Symphony & New World Brass John Harle (saxophone) conducted by Michael Tilson Thomas on argo
    Dahl.jpg

    Here's an unfamiliar composer to me - Ingolf Dahl. Born in Sweden but moved to America in the second world war.

    Here we have-
    - Concerto for Alto Saxophone
    - Hymn
    - Music for Brass Instruments
    - The Tower of Saint Barbara

    I was rather reminded of Stravinsky in the concerto. Enjoyable music but perhaps not exactly essential listening.

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  11. #46941
    Senior Member Red Terror's Avatar
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    Fabulous recordings by an underrated Master.

    Last edited by Red Terror; Feb-14-2020 at 21:55.

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    Senior Member NightHawk's Avatar
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    71jfLzHbUBL._SX522_.jpg
    This recording is excellent - the issues of balance and contrast, so necessary in Carter's highly polyphonic music, are handled with great virtuosity. Reading the full score of the Variations for Orchestra (1953-54), for instance, one notices that every nuance of rhythm is clearly delineated. Carter was a brilliant orchestrator and the recording is also noteworthy for the kaleidoscopic effects of instrumental color. Highly recommended if you like Carter's 'romantic ultra-modernism'.
    Last edited by NightHawk; Feb-14-2020 at 22:06.

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    Henri Dutilleux: The Centenary Edition on Erato
    Dutilleux.jpg

    Discs 1 & 2 from this 7 CD set, featuring:

    - Symphony No. 1 with the Orchestre de Paris conducted by Paavo Jarvi

    - Symphony No. 2 'Le Double' with the Orchestre des Concerts Lamoureux conducted by Charles Munch

    - Le Loup, ballet music with Jean Anouith (reader) and the Orchestre du Theatre des Champs-Elysees conducted by Paul Bonneau

    - Metaboles with the Orchestre de Paris conducted by Paavo Jarvi

    - Timbres, espace, movement ou 'La Nuit etoilee' with the Orchestre National de France conducted by Mstislav Rostropovich

    Interesting orchestral music here. An excellent introduction to the music of Henri Dutilleux.

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  17. #46944
    Senior Member pianozach's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rogerx View Post




    Verdi: Otello

    Jon Vickers (Otello), Mirella Freni (Desdemona), Peter Glossop (Iago), Aldo Bottion (Cassio), Michel Senechal (Rodrigo), Jose van Dam (Lodovico), Mario Machi (Montano), Stefania Malagù (Emilia), Hans Helm (Un Araldo)

    Berliner Philharmoniker, Chor der Deutschen Oper Berlin, Herbert von Karajan.
    Perhaps 40 years ago this casting might not have bothered me at all, but seeing this photo today shocked me. I figured at first this might be the 1950s or early 1960s (Vickers played the part in 1960).

    They couldn't find a tenor of color that could have performed this? What . . . wait . . . this was 1973?

    From Wikipedia:

    Blackface controversy

    For many years it was common for white singers to wear dark makeup when playing Otello. The Metropolitan Opera stopped the practice in 2015. Some have argued that using dark makeup for the character is a matter of costuming, and not a true example of racist blackface. The Metropolitan decision led to calls for casting more people of color in opera.
    Heh heh. A "matter of costuming". Nice try.

    Now that I'm thinking about it, is there actually any official recording released with a person of color playing the part of Otello?
    Last edited by pianozach; Feb-14-2020 at 22:42.

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  19. #46945
    Senior Member DavidA's Avatar
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    Istomin.jpg

    Listening to the SCHUMANN concerto with Walter from this very fine and underrated pianist. What fine performance - as good as any in the catalogue
    Last edited by DavidA; Feb-14-2020 at 22:42.

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    Senior Member flamencosketches's Avatar
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    Richard Wagner: Overture from Der fliegende Holländer. Gerard Schwarz, Seattle Symphony. Free download from the "New on Naxos" newsletter. Thank you, Klaus Heymann. Really enjoying it so far. This is my first listen to anything from the Schwarz/Seattle catalog. I know they are an iconic team. So far I really like it. If there were to be an alternative "Big 5" list of up-and-coming orchestras, perhaps the Seattle Symphony (and the Atlanta SO, for that matter) would be a part of it.

    Quote Originally Posted by Rambler View Post
    Henri Dutilleux: The Centenary Edition on Erato
    Dutilleux.jpg

    Discs 1 & 2 from this 7 CD set, featuring:

    - Symphony No. 1 with the Orchestre de Paris conducted by Paavo Jarvi

    - Symphony No. 2 'Le Double' with the Orchestre des Concerts Lamoureux conducted by Charles Munch

    - Le Loup, ballet music with Jean Anouith (reader) and the Orchestre du Theatre des Champs-Elysees conducted by Paul Bonneau

    - Metaboles with the Orchestre de Paris conducted by Paavo Jarvi

    - Timbres, espace, movement ou 'La Nuit etoilee' with the Orchestre National de France conducted by Mstislav Rostropovich

    Interesting orchestral music here. An excellent introduction to the music of Henri Dutilleux.


    ^Still strongly considering going for that set. I just got paid today, I'll splurge on one box set or another
    Last edited by flamencosketches; Feb-14-2020 at 22:47.

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    Senior Member eljr's Avatar
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    Those who can make you believe absurdities can make you commit atrocities.
    Voltaire

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    Senior Member flamencosketches's Avatar
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    Robert Schumann: String Quartet No.1 in A minor, op.41 no.1. Zehetmair Quartett, on ECM. I don't know what it is, but a lot of these ECM releases and the artists on their label have a way of presenting older repertoire in a more contemporary light. Perhaps my perception is being colored by the very modern, very minimalistic packaging. Anyway, the music is beautiful. Very much enjoying it, so far.

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  27. #46949
    Senior Member Allegro Con Brio's Avatar
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    Default The Mahler Journey- Day 12

    Symphony No. 10 (Deryck Cooke completion)
    Simon Rattle/Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra

    First of all, if there's anyone at all who has been reading what I've been writing about Mahler throughout the last week and a half, I extend my profound gratitude. That is all

    Now, on to the 10th. As we finish the Mahler Journey, I find it hard to process just how much this man changed as an artist throughout his life. Of course, this was largely due to outside circumstances as we have seen. But the wide-eyed cosmos-charter of the early Wunderhorn days gradually learned to channel his energies into more crystalline and profound experiments, culminating in the indelible vistas of Das Lied and the 9th. Truly, it has been strangely and amazingly fascinating to embark on this journey. I had always seen the 9th as Mahler's final statement which he had nothing to build upon. But obviously, such a restless man as Mahler could not end there. Even as life ran him ragged in his final days, he worked feverishly as if to try and defy the grip of death to the greatest of his abilities. With what he left us of the 10th, we see something very clear emerge- a potential fourth stage of his output that shows his willingness to be more avant-garde than ever, as if he wanted to let loose all the unrealized depth of his soon-to-be-perished mind. Even the first movement Adagio, the only completed movement (and even then not fully orchestrated) clearly demonstrates that Mahler would have been fascinated by the Second Viennese School, the Soviet protestors, British pastoralism, and all the other various musical movements of the century. In the 10th, we see the sort of personality we expect from Mahler, but one that is just beginning to reshape itself into a different aesthetic. He was too adventurous to confine himself to a single style, or to be content with the 9th as his final statement.

    This Adagio is a far, far cry from the breathless transcendence of the similar movement in the 9th. Though its principal theme is hauntingly beautiful and searching, there is more of a sense of resignation and acceptance in this music than in the tacit epic battles underneath the skin of the 9th. Most notable is the extraordinarily chromatic harmonic language which toes the line between late Romanticism and something that Schoenberg would appreciate. A crucial concept in the 10th is the relationship between calm and turbulence, possibly related to Mahler's struggle to accept death or rebel against it. Through this magnificently rich, meandering chromaticism; Mahler crafts what may be one of his more ingenious movements, though it certainly doesn't appeal to me as much as others. The middle section of the symphony frames an oddly short, frantic Purgatorio supposedly representing his torment over Alma's apathy with two scherzi that blend classic Mahlerian grotesquerie and folk dances. This music doesn't seem as well-developed or convincing as his previous such movements, however. Of course, that is to be expected when this is essentially, Cooke's own composition based off Mahler's rough material. The finale, though, is by far my favorite part. It opens with a series of terrifying gestures- anguished utterances from the contrabassoon punctuated by shattering, gunshot-like blows to a huge military drum. Another series of punishments from Fate? There then follows a reprise of the first movement music that is worked out in a large sonata form. After this harrowing rhetoric, the final minutes round off the ouevre of Gustav Mahler with the most fitting material that could be imagined. After all this experimentation, this alien dissonance, this discomfort, that has dominated the symphony, we experience a taste of rapture. A brutally honest and unreasonably gorgeous melody, accompanied angelically by the harp, imprints itself on the minds of listeners and seems to seamlessly merge into the heavens. After all this struggle, all this exploration, all this terror, all this cataclysm, all this pain, all this hope- not only in this symphony but in his life's work- all that remains is peace and dignity. One is reminded of the amazingly still and content final pages of the Bruckner 9th Adagio- we know the composer meant to write more, and that this is not his intended final word. But it sure does move us to the core. How much of this is Cooke and how much of this is Mahler, we may never know. But as we end this journey, it leaves us with a glimmer of hope that maybe, just maybe; this troubled, troubled soul found a smidgen of consolation in those final days before succumbing to a blood infection at age 51. In the life to come that you so fervently grasped for, I hope very dearly, Gustav, that you are in possession of that beauty that you spent your life in pursuit of.

    This is actually the first time I've heard this complete symphony, so I'm unfamiliar with performances. Though I wasn't blown away by this one from Rattle (a bit of a dull orchestral sound), there was plenty of passion and gusto as the score demanded.

    I leave you with my personal ranking of all 20 of Gustav's works after this journey:

    20. Blumine
    19. Totenfeier
    18. Das Klagende Lied
    17. Piano Quartet
    16. No. 8
    15. Songs of a Wayfarer
    14. No. 10
    13. No. 7
    12. No. 3
    11. Des Knaben Wunderhorn
    10. Lieder und Gesange
    9. No. 1
    8. No. 5
    7. Ruckert-Lieder
    6. Kindertotenlieder
    5. Das Lied von der Erde
    4. No. 2
    3. No. 6
    2. No. 4
    1. No. 9

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  29. #46950
    Senior Member Eramire156's Avatar
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    Default Day 6 starting the late quartets

    Ludwig van Beethoven
    String Quartet no"12, op.127 in E flat major


    IMG_1716.JPG

    Leipziger Streichquartett



    taking a break from Beethoven

    Bela Bartok
    Violin Sonatas no.1 & 2


    IMG_1717.JPG

    Eugene Drucker
    Diane Walsh

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