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Thread: Learning violin as an adult?

  1. #16
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    I started learning violin at 25 years of age. Before that, I had no knowledge about it. I did not even know how to hold a violin.
    I got help from a website which guided me of the right instruments, practice tips.
    Sharing the link of the website with you : https://fiddlersguide.com/
    Hope so it helps you, just like it was of great help for me.

  2. #17
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    Default Violin Learning Guide

    I started learning violin at 25 years of age. Before that, I had no knowledge about it. I did not even know how to hold a violin.
    I got help from a website which guided me of the right instruments, practice tips.
    Sharing the link of the website with you : https://fiddlersguide.com/
    Hope so it helps you, just like it was of great help for me.

  3. Likes Will Roberts liked this post
  4. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by senza sordino View Post
    I started as an adult, but that was twenty years ago. It's hard to asses a violin without being able to play well, so buying an instrument as a beginner is difficult. A violin seller could give you a Stradivari to try, but as a beginner it'll sound pretty rough. So will a $200 instrument. Perhaps try a rent to own first.

    I suggest you get yourself a teacher. A good teacher will show you the basics without any sloppy habits. A good tone takes time and good technique. It takes no time at all to make a good sound on a piano, it takes much longer on the violin. Don't let that fact stop you though. And a good teacher can help assess any violin you hope to buy.

    It's difficult to answer "how difficult is learning the violin?" Each instrument has its difficulties. You can immediately make a piano sound great with one finger, but to play with all ten takes time. With a violin you will usually only need to make one note sound at a time, but it's all about tone and intonation, vibrato and the quality of sound.

    The nice thing about violin is that you can probably find some amateur orchestras to play with. There is nothing more thrilling than sitting in an orchestra playing a full symphony. Pianists or guitar players don't get to do that.
    This is a really hand thread, thank you especially for this contribution which is an excellent bit of inspiring realism! My wife wants to learn the violin (at 32). Being a 'cellist and teacher I thought I could probably guide her through the basics but it turns out, unsurprisingly, more research is necessary. Anyway this is all really helpful so thanks to everyone who contributed above.

  5. #19
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    Hi everyone,
    Just wanted to share that I am a violin teacher and if anyone decides to take private lessons, here is my website https://theviolinlessons.com , just one more opportunity to improve violin playing, thank you

  6. #20
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    Others already wrote it, so I confirm:
    • Every single instrument helps you mightily to learn a new one, even if the movements differ a lot. Not just to read the notes and apply training techniques. I just wonder why.
    • I suppose learning the violin demands a professor. There's so much to do wrongly!
    • There are far too many violinists. The viola is badly in demand and its scores use to be easier, advantage and drawback.

    The best student of my first professor had played the piano before starting the violin at 10. She's now a professional violinist and violist. I know no example of a professional violinist who started music at 10.

    My second professor played the guitar and the French horn before starting the violin at 12. She plays magnificently and is a professional.

    The piano and the violin are fully compatible. Julia Fischer gives concerts on both.

    Apparently your choice is already made... But did you consider the bassoon? It's hugely in demand. Klaus Thunemann learned the piano before starting the bassoon at 18, and so did Alexandre Silverio at 15. Playing it lets synchronize opposite movements of the 10 fingers, maybe the piano helps.

  7. #21
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    This is an old thread, and others have expressed similar thoughts - but I wanted to reconfirm some of them from personal experience. I learnt the classical guitar for some years, and then moved to the violin (the reason being I could not find a teacher who could guide me after a certain stage) when I was 36. What I learnt in terms of music theory, sight reading, practice strategies in guitar - all carried over to violin as well.

    It's extremely important to get a good teacher for the violin - learning to hold it properly without discomfort takes a long time, not to speak of holding the bow. I was fortunate enough to find one nearby, and I still attend his classes (online now, after this Covid situation).

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