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Thread: Max Reger

  1. #76
    Senior Member SanAntone's Avatar
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    I enjoy his lieder, both those with piano and orchestral.

    Iris Vermillion, Peter Stamm


  2. #77
    Senior Member elgars ghost's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RobertJTh View Post
    Fun fact: the work you linked to (the 2nd clarinet sonata in F sharp minor) is one of the very few works in music history that use a triple sharp (x#)...

    Attachment 160092

    Harmonically it looks like an F# major chord with prolonged double chromatic appogiaturas for the 3rd and 5th. And the middle appogiatura (G double sharp) gets a changing note from below (F triple sharp)
    Reger, you absolute madman!
    I didn't even know such a thing as a triple sharp could exist, but thanks to the snatch of notation in your post now I know. I can't read music but unusual quirks like that sometimes pique my interest. I admit that what else you went on to say went somewhat over my head but it was still good of you for pointing it out.
    '...a violator of his word, a libertine over head and ears in debt and disgrace, a despiser of domestic ties, the companion of gamblers and demireps, a man who has just closed half a century without a single claim on the gratitude of his country or the respect of posterity...' - Leigh Hunt on the Prince Regent (later George IV).

    ὃν οἱ θεοὶ φιλοῦσιν ἀποθνῄσκει νέος [Those whom the gods love die young] - Menander

  3. #78
    Senior Member fluteman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by elgars ghost View Post
    I didn't even know such a thing as a triple sharp could exist, but thanks to the snatch of notation in your post now I know. I can't read music but unusual quirks like that sometimes pique my interest. I admit that what else you went on to say went somewhat over my head but it was still good of you for pointing it out.
    In the good ole days, many traditional acoustic instruments were much easier to play in certain keys, such as D, G and C major and their relative minor keys, than, say, F-sharp major, where 6 of 7 notes in the scale are sharped. So traditional notation was set up to be much easier to read in those 'more common' keys. But Reger wasn't necessarily trying to do things the easy way.

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  5. #79
    Member RobertJTh's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by fluteman View Post
    In the good ole days, many traditional acoustic instruments were much easier to play in certain keys, such as D, G and C major and their relative minor keys, than, say, F-sharp major, where 6 of 7 notes in the scale are sharped. So traditional notation was set up to be much easier to read in those 'more common' keys. But Reger wasn't necessarily trying to do things the easy way.
    This particular piece is written in F# minor, which is an excellent key for an A clarinet to play in.
    It's just that in the last movement coda, Reger goes for the happy ending (F# major) and things get kind of gnarly in the piano score.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chatellerault View Post
    No organ music? He has a vast oeuvre, including sonatas, suites, many chorals, choral fantasias...
    Never really liked organ music

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