Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: Can human voice sing chords?

  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    758
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Can human voice sing chords?

    I know, it's stupid question, but I wonder... I hear people can sing chords... I mean, that melodies that consist chords you must play with more piano keys at the same time, right? So, how it is still possible for voice to sing chords?

    I'm not professional or educated musician, so I'm interested about technical aspect of that out of curiosity.
    Last edited by nikola; Mar-20-2018 at 10:54.

  2. #2
    Senior Member Eschbeg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    604
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    There is a tradition of polyphonic singing (sometimes called "throat singing") in the regions around Mongolia where singers sustain a long note with their voice and then manipulate the shape of their lips to accentuate the overtones, thereby singing more than one note at a time. Here is an example:



    While the singer sustains a low, gravel-ish note with his voice, you'll hear what sounds like whistling. That "whistling" is also coming from his voice; it is the sound of the overtones of the fundamental note he's singing.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Larkenfield's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Location
    Sedona
    Posts
    957
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Another example of polyphonic singing, and I find it rather mind-blowing:

    Last edited by Larkenfield; Mar-20-2018 at 14:28.
    Great things are done by a series of small things brought together. —Vincent Van Gogh

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    758
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I probably wasn't too much clear what I meant.

    For example, this is original with voice:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i3Q8...=youtu.be&t=50

    This is piano version:
    https://youtu.be/7JeGyfVk2JI?t=45

    Instead of only one piano key, he also hits chords with right hand.

    So, my question is, can she actually sing that 'chord' at once? Is chord more like tone in between those tones or something like that?
    When I listen to her singing, it seems like she can sing chords or is that only an illusion because of other instruments beside her voice replacing those missing key in her voice if chord of the right hand on piano has 2 tones for example.
    Can she sing those 2 tones or she sings only 1 tone and string are playing that other tone from chord?
    Although it seems to me that strings are more replacement for left hand.
    Last edited by nikola; Mar-22-2018 at 12:03.

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Posts
    155
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    absolutely incredible.

  6. #6
    Senior Member Majed Al Shamsi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Dubai, UAE.
    Posts
    174
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Larkenfield - I remember the first time I saw that video, I thought the lady was possessed.

    nikola - To my ear, it sounds like the lady is singing a single melodic line. I don't hear a second human voice in that part of the piece.
    A chord is usually three or more notes, played together, in harmony. An example would be C, E and G, for the C Major chord.
    I've seen a few videos on polyphonic singing, with people producing two sounds that are sung independently, but I have yet to see (or hear) someone produce three or more sounds.

  7. Likes Larkenfield liked this post
  8. #7
    New Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Posts
    9
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Omg she sang at my college for a special treat! She was sooooo cool to meet!

  9. #8
    New Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Posts
    9
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Would anyone have any reading material on the techniques for throat singing or perhaps any resources for such?

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •