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Thread: Oppo Ceases Production

  1. #16
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    The Oppo UDP-205 sounds great when playing modern high-quality hi-res classical recordings such as Blu-ray, SACD, and 24bit/192kHz FLAC downloads. (Here’s a thread on classical Blu-ray recordings: Blu-ray Videos of Classical Concerts)

    My favorite system is my surround sound system in the basement, with either my Scott 296 (6L6GC), or McIntosh MX110Z / Scott LK150 (KT88) driving the L&R main speakers, and a second stereo tube amp driving the center and single rear speaker. This configuration delivers natural sound, and enough dynamic range to recreate what I remember hearing in the symphony hall and opera house.

    Here’s my current systems:

    Basement: Front, center, and left speakers are Klipsch RF-7 II. A single rear speaker is a Klipsch RF-7. Subwoofers: SVS SB16-Ultra, Klipsch R-115SW. Source: Oppo UDP-205 (with USB hard drive containing high-res FLAC recordings). Amps: Scott 272, Inspire “Fire Bottle” SE Stereo Tube Amplifier HO, Scott 222C, McIntosh MX110Z tuner/preamp, Fisher KX-200, Scott 296, Pilot SA-260, Scott LK150. A patch panel allows me to connect the speakers to whichever amp I want, and F/F RCA cables enable me to connect an amp to the Oppo, and a power amp to the MX110Z. Chromecast Audio for internet radio and Spotify Premium.

    TV room: Stereo speakers are Klipsch Palladium P-37F. Subwoofer: Klipsch P-312W. The source is an Oppo UDP-205 (with USB hard drive containing high-res FLAC recordings). The amps are Scott 399, McIntosh MC225, Kenwood KR-9050, Fisher 800B, Fisher X-1000, Scott 299C, McIntosh MC240, and an NAD C375BEE. The tube amps are for music. The solid-state amps are for movies. A patch panel (banana plugs) allows me to connect the speakers to whichever amp I want, and Niles AXP-1 RCA selector switches connect the Oppo to the amp. Chromecast Audio for internet radio and Spotify Premium.

    Living room: Stereo speakers are Snell Type CV. Subwoofer: Klipsch P-312W. The source components are Oppo BDP-105 (with USB hard drive containing high-res FLAC recordings), and Dual 1249 with Stanton 681EE. Amps include a pair of McIntosh MC30s, Scott 296, McIntosh MX110Z / McIntosh MC275, a pair of Pilot HF-56 mono receivers, an NAD pre-amp and Acurus A250 power-amp for movies, and a McIntosh 2155 driving JBL L830s in the kitchen / dining room. A patch panel (banana plugs) allows me to connect the speakers to whichever amp I want, and a Niles AXP-1 RCA selector switch connects the Oppo to the amp. Chromecast Audio for internet radio and Spotify Premium.

    Office: Stereo speakers are JBL L880. Sources: Oppo DV-980H SACD/CD/DVD, and my Windows 10 laptop with Music Streamer II DAC. Amps: Fisher 500C, Scott 299B, Altec 353A, and an NAD D 3020 for general internet use (and summertime). Banana jacks allow me to connect the speakers to whichever amp I want, and a Niles AXP-1 RCA selector switch connects the Oppo to the amp.

    Bedroom: The speaker is a single Klipsch WF-35. Source is an older CD player. Fisher TA 500 (AM/FM mono receiver). Chromecast Audio for internet radio and Spotify Premium.

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  3. #17
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    I also have 3 systems, and then an Apple Home Pod in the kitchen. Have you ever considered going the whole Home Audio route, where you can have The same recording in all systems simultaneously? I use Bluesound for this. You could also consolidate all your High Res recordings onto one Hard Drive—a NAS, perhaps—and be able to listen to all of them regardless of where you are in the home

  4. #18
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    I’ve read descriptions of how SACDs (the SACD layer of a hybrid SACD, not the CD layer) can be copied via “a PS3 or a few of the modified players”. Based on what I’ve read, some of the “hacking” procedures for copying SACDs are not straightforward, and my assessment is that these procedures would mostly appeal to computer hobbyists. (These “hacking procedures” are different from dropping an SACD into the PC disc tray and directly playing (or copying) the SACD layer.)

    Similarly, I’ve read that it’s possible – but not easy – to copy Blu-ray and Ultra HD Blu-ray discs (with some compromise in functionality).

    Apparently, some people enjoy performing these copying “hacks” – i.e., it’s a hobby. To each their own – we all enjoy the hobby of hi-fi differently. However, I question whether this saves time, when you consider the time to research the options, learn the procedure, install and configure the software, and copy all of the discs, and edit metadata for each recording (which is reportedly required for many classical recordings in order to sort out composer, composition, conductor, orchestra, soloists, etc.).

    Others (like me) would rather drop a disc into the tray of a universal player (e.g., Oppo UDP-205) and hit the Play button. (Or use folders to organize downloaded hi-res files (e.g., from HDTracks), and use the Oppo’s remote to navigate the folders.)

    A problem with using an external DAC is finding one that will handle all digital music formats (CD, SACD, Blu-ray, Ultra HD Blu-ray, hi-res FLAC download, and hi-res DSD download), and will handle multi-channel (5.1), and that someone who is not a computer hobbyist can easily install and use – without investing significant effort in transcoding their music library.

    In my experiments with streaming (DLNA in-home, and streaming from Spotify for music, and Netflix for movies), I’ve experienced occasional drop-outs (and other aggravations), which ruins the listening experience for me.

    OTOH, when playing discs via my Oppo UDP-205, I enjoy uncompromised quality (e.g., the full Blu-ray experience: uncompressed audio and video), multi-channel (5.1 via SACD and Blu-ray), ease-of-use (simply drop a disc in the tray and hit Play), reliability, and excellent audio (and video) quality.

    I generally listen to one symphony at a time, one opera at a time, etc. I don’t play one 3-minute-long song from one album, followed by a different 3-minute song from a different album. The concepts of playlists or shuffle play are not relevant for me. I see no benefit to selecting music from a tablet or smartphone, vs. getting out of the chair once an hour to retrieve a disc. (When I explore new music, I use my PC (which has a full keyboard and mouse) and I use Youtube, with a stereo DAC into my office hi-fi system.)

    I currently have one multi-channel hi-fi system, and am considering upgrading a second system to multi-channel. Given the proliferation of classical multi-channel SACD and Blu-ray recordings, these have become my preferred format, and I’m happy with the Oppo UDP-205 as the playback machine.

    Unfortunately, no one currently makes a universal player comparable to the Oppo UDP-205. Other than an AVR or home theater preamp/processor, the only other solution I’m aware of for multi-channel hi-fi is a multi-channel DAC – and the last time I checked they’re rare, and expensive – and not marketed to the average music lover. (Suggestion: google “multi-channel DAC”) I think many people now realize that the Oppo UDP-205 is a well-designed, well-built, uniquely versatile product for a very reasonable price.

    Until the market changes, the question will become: How many audiophiles who want multi-channel and who want to use their own hi-fi amps (e.g., tube enthusiasts, or anyone who doesn’t want to play music via an AVR) will use a home theater preamp/processor? (Why tubes? Tube amps vs. solid-state for classical music and opera) How much does a disc player and home theater preamp/processor (or multi-channel DAC) cost compared to the Oppo UDP-205?

    And, for 2.1 (stereo plus subwoofer) systems, I find the Oppo UDP-205 to be a great value.

    Based on these considerations, for many people $1,300(US) for a UDP-205 doesn’t seem expensive.

    It will be interesting to see how many more batches of UDP-205 that Oppo will manufacture. (As of today, Oppo still offers a sign-up list on their web site for a possible future production run of UDP-205.)
    Last edited by RobertKC; Sep-18-2018 at 00:35.

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  6. #19
    Senior Member Joe B's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RobertKC View Post
    (As of today, Oppo still offers a sign-up list on their web site for a possible future production run of UDP-205.)
    Evidently things change rather quickly:

    https://oppodigital.com/blu-ray-udp-205/lastbatch.aspx
    I love music. I want music. I need music.

  7. #20
    Senior Member jegreenwood's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RobertKC View Post
    I’ve read descriptions of how SACDs (the SACD layer of a hybrid SACD, not the CD layer) can be copied via “a PS3 or a few of the modified players”. Based on what I’ve read, some of the “hacking” procedures for copying SACDs are not straightforward, and my assessment is that these procedures would mostly appeal to computer hobbyists. (These “hacking procedures” are different from dropping an SACD into the PC disc tray and directly playing (or copying) the SACD layer.)


    . . . .
    Too bad you don't have an (unmodified) Oppo 10x. You can use that to play or rip SACDs. From what I've read, you can't do that with 20x.

    For the record, I have ripped about 450 SACDs using a PS3. (I have an Oppo 105, but most of my ripping was done before the Oppo technique was published.) Initial configuration of the PS3 was a little confusing, and the ripping and tagging (as with all classical music tagging) were time consuming, but for me it was worth doing.
    Last edited by jegreenwood; Sep-18-2018 at 13:12.

  8. #21
    Senior Member gardibolt's Avatar
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    Glad I got my UDP-205 while they still had stock left.
    Hours of unrecorded, unpublished and unknown Beethoven works at The Unheard Beethoven

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