Results 1 to 12 of 12

Thread: New at composing

  1. #1
    New Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Posts
    5
    Post Thanks / Like

    Question New at composing

    I start composing very recently with musescore. I am trying make this better but i cant name the detect and name the mistake. Something is wrong with it. Can you give your opions?
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Attached Files Attached Files

  2. Likes Capeditiea liked this post
  3. #2
    New Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Posts
    5
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    ..and i cant even edit. excuse me.

  4. #3
    Senior Member Majed Al Shamsi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Dubai, UAE.
    Posts
    174
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Hello, fasolla!
    Do you know anything about basic harmony, by any chance?

  5. #4
    New Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Posts
    5
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Majed Al Shamsi View Post
    by any chance?
    why so harsh? no i am trying to learn things.

  6. #5
    Senior Member Pugg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    The Netherlands
    Posts
    39,999
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by fasolla View Post
    ..and i cant even edit. excuse me.
    You have to make 10 posts first, try the same question in the today's composers section, they might be helpful.
    First they ignore you, then they laugh at you, then they fight you, then you win.
    "Mahatma Gandhi"

  7. Likes ldiat, Capeditiea liked this post
  8. #6
    Banned
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Location
    Some Dimension
    Posts
    262
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    5

    Default

    :O is that really your first composition?
    are you aiming for dissonance?

    it is musescore, so certain instrumental aspects will be lost.

    personally i like it. it has a very interesting feeling to it. Harmony doesn't always make a song good. Remember this.

    Also, only take everyone else's reviews as a grain of salt... but study many things experiment with sound and counterpoint.
    Learn about the Sonata form, along with various terminology. (which all can be found on wikipedia.) Also, invest in a lot of time, make it as important as you wish it to be percieved.

    Some of us here are not as focused on consonance as others, and provide some understanding to the various learning curves we individually have.


    ---edited to add
    come to the dark side...
    Last edited by Capeditiea; Apr-10-2018 at 10:22.

  9. #7
    Senior Member Majed Al Shamsi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Dubai, UAE.
    Posts
    174
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by fasolla View Post
    why so harsh? no i am trying to learn things.
    Harsh..?

    I'll just ignore that...

    I suspect that the reason you feel like there is a mistake, which you can't quite detect, is because of the lack of harmony.
    Capeditiea has already touched on the topic of consonance and dissonance.
    Put simply, consonance is when two or more notes sound like they are in harmony together, and dissonance is when they are not; when they sound wrong.
    Obviously, any well-written piece has a mix of both, as dissonance can be employed to create stress and tension in the piece, leading to a relaxed consonance ending, where all that tension is released.

    You'll have to learn about harmony either way, to know when and when not to use it.

    To help you out, I will list topics that I think will lead you to a better understanding of harmony, and I'll list them in order. Look them up online, and if you get stuck somewhere, or have a question, you can add it to this thread, and I (as well as others, I'm sure,) would love to help you out.

    =====

    The topics are:

    1. Intervals, and these include:
    a. Half steps and whole steps.
    b. Minor second, major second and augmented second.
    c. Diminished third, minor third and major third.
    d. Diminished fourth, perfect fourth and augmented fourth.
    e. Diminished fifth, perfect fifth and augmented fifth.
    f. Minor sixth, major sixth and augmented sixth.
    g. Diminished seventh, minor seventh and major seventh.
    h. Perfect octave.

    2. Scales, and these include:
    a. Major scale.
    b. Minor scale, in all its three forms (natural minor, harmonic minor and melodic minor.)
    c. How to build these scales using half/whole steps, as well as using intervals from your key note.

    3. Triads (3-note chords,) and these include:
    a. Major chords.
    b. Minor chords.
    c. Diminished chords.
    d. Augmented chords.
    e. How to construct the chords above, using intervals from the root note.

    4. Cadences, and these include:
    a. Perfect cadence.
    b. Imperfect cadence.
    c. Deceptive cadence.
    d. Plagal cadence.
    e. Half cadence.

    5. Degrees and functions:
    a. Using roman numerals to represent the degree of a note in a scale.
    b. The three functions of Tonic, Dominant and Subdominant.

    =====

    It might seem like a lot, but I imagine one can go through all of that to get a rough idea, at a relaxed pace, in about two or three days. You'll emerge from it a different composer, no doubt, and it will make learning harmony and counter-point much, much easier.
    Good luck to you.

  10. Likes Capeditiea liked this post
  11. #8
    New Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Posts
    5
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Thank you! I aimed for nothing.

  12. Likes Capeditiea liked this post
  13. #9
    New Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Posts
    5
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    sorry for my misunderstanding. i will definitely start to learn these. thank you!

  14. Likes Capeditiea liked this post
  15. #10
    Senior Member Fredx2098's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Location
    Indiana, USA
    Posts
    796
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I enjoy the piece. I don't hear anything "wrong" with it, except I'd use different instruments (is that a quartet of cellos?) and I'm not the biggest fan of the consonant ending.

    If that sounds close to what you compose, I would urge you to keep composing in that style. It sounds really nice to me, but learning about music theory, harmony, counterpoint, etc. is helpful for all styles of music. Unlike others, I don't think that piece shows a lack of understanding of those things, unless you were just composing randomly and not really aware of what you were doing.

  16. #11
    Senior Member Phil loves classical's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Location
    Ford Nation
    Posts
    3,099
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Some of the accompaniments are quite dissonant while the melody is quite consonant in other parts. It sounds you are mixing different concepts together on the get-go. Based on the nature of this music, my advice is to write out the music with traditional harmony first, then start adding dissonance for effect. That way, both will be properly differentiated, and the music will become more intelligible.
    "Forgive me, Majesty. I'm a vulgar man. But I assure you, my music is not.“ Mozart

  17. #12
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2017
    Posts
    55
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    If you are new at composing I'd recommend starting on basic keys like C or G and keep it tonal. If you want to go the other approach (dissonance and atonality) thats fine but I don't think you should do it simply because you are unfamiliar with tonality and consonance. Try creating a few riffs off a basic arpeggio

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •