Results 1 to 4 of 4

Thread: John Jenkins (1592–1678)

  1. #1
    Sr. Moderator Taggart's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Norfolk (ex-Glasgow)
    Posts
    3,584
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default John Jenkins (1592–1678)

    John Jenkins was one of the leading English composers of the Stuart and Commonwealth eras, particularly known for his consort music. He was born in Maidstone in Kent. His first known appearance is as one of the players in the masque The Triumph of Peace in 1634. He played before Charles I on the lyra viol and the king remarked that he did "wonders on an inconsiderable instrument". Charles had been taught by Coperario along with the Lawes brothers so was qualified to judge.

    Jenkins was the supreme composer of music for the viols. He grew up when the music of Byrd and his contemporaries was in full flower and he continued until the emergence of Purcell in the 1670s. He came to maturity as a composer in the 1620s, following in the footsteps of the generation that had developed the consort fantasia for viols, in particular Alfonso Ferrabosco II, Thomas Lupo, John Coprario and Orlando Gibbons. Although never a daring pioneer like his great friend William Lawes or, later, Matthew Locke, he nevertheless kept sufficiently abreast of new developments to contribute substantially to many of them as they materialized. His works appear to have been the mainstay of home music making in England during his time and for some years after. They exhibit exceptional control of form and effect, and a fine melodic sensibility. Around 1640 Jenkins revived the In Nomine, for a consort of viols. He wrote a notable piece of programme music after the siege of Newark

    During the Civil War, Jenkins was employed as music-master to two Royalist families, the Derhams at West Dereham and Hamon le Strange of Hunstanton. In the 1650s, became resident music-master of Lord Dudley North in Cambridgeshire, whose son Roger wrote his biography. After the restoration, he was named theorbo player in the King's Musick in 1660, but probably spent little time at court. Roger North records that:

    tho' he for many years was uncapable to attend, the court musicians had so much value for him, that advantage was not taken, but he received his salary as they were pay'd

    He passed his final years in semi-retirement at the home of Sir Philip Wodehouse in Norfolk. His grave in Kimberly church, Norfolk, bears a little verse:

    Under this Stone Rare Jenkins lie
    The Master of the Musick Art
    Whom from the Earth the God on High
    Called up to Him to bear his part.
    Aged eighty six October twenty seven
    In anno seventy eight he went to Heaven.
    Music begins where words leave off. Music expresses the inexpressible.

  2. Likes Ingélou, Barelytenor liked this post
  3. #2
    Sr. Moderator Taggart's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Norfolk (ex-Glasgow)
    Posts
    3,584
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    Some of his music:

    Pavan for 2 bass viols - Fretwork



    For two Divisions Viols to a A Ground - Expedition Audio



    Suite C from Ayres for two trebles, two basses and organ - Jaye consort Helsinki

    Music begins where words leave off. Music expresses the inexpressible.

  4. Likes Ingélou liked this post
  5. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    3,299
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    Jenkins chamber music is very enjoyable and easy to listen to, and I've heard that his music is fun to play. Whether he's the supreme composer of music for viols, or even the supreme composer of English music for viols, is another question. The Christopher Tye ensemble pieces, and most of all the extraordinary solo viol pieces by Tobias Hume, seem to have a psychological and spiritual depth which may be less apparent in Jenkins.
    Last edited by Mandryka; May-01-2018 at 12:36.

  6. Likes Ingélou liked this post
  7. #4
    Senior Member JSBach85's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Location
    Madrid, (Sp)
    Posts
    357
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I really enjoy english consort music and I usually listen to it on saturdays. Being John Jenkins among my favourite consort composers I have some of the recordings available:

    John Jenkins - All in a garden green. Rose Consort of Viols



    John Jenkins - Consort Music for Viols in Six Parts.



    John Jenkins - The pleasing slumber. Sophie Gent, Romina Lischka, Philippe Pierlot, François Guerrier
    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Pleasing-Sl...nkins+pleasing

  8. Likes Ingélou liked this post

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •