Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 16 to 23 of 23

Thread: Greatest Rock Guitar player - Terry Kath

  1. #16
    Senior Member ldiat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    Piru,Ca
    Posts
    2,773
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default


  2. Likes laurie liked this post
  3. #17
    Senior Member Kevin Pearson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Knoxville, TN
    Posts
    1,551
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    The only way you can appreciate Free Form Guitar is if you are higher then a kite. Since I haven't been that way in 40 years I just can't listen to it.

  4. Likes ldiat liked this post
  5. #18
    Senior Member Enthusiast's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Posts
    2,355
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Kevin Pearson View Post
    The only way you can appreciate Free Form Guitar is if you are higher then a kite. Since I haven't been that way in 40 years I just can't listen to it.
    So some music can not be enjoyed by people who are straight/sober? I don't know Free Form Guitar so maybe you are right. But it seemed to me that being high sometimes opened up music for me but then, once it was open, I enjoyed it without chemical enhancement.

  6. #19
    Senior Member ldiat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    Piru,Ca
    Posts
    2,773
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Kevin Pearson View Post
    The only way you can appreciate Free Form Guitar is if you are higher then a kite. Since I haven't been that way in 40 years I just can't listen to it.
    have a few glasses of merlot

  7. #20
    Senior Member elgars ghost's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Worcestershire, England
    Posts
    6,735
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Had Chicago's debut been a single album I might argue that there shouldn't have been room for a 7-minute unaccompanied guitar solo, but as it was a double album lasting nearly 80 minutes I don't have a problem with it - when albums are that long there is more scope for including different things, however self-indulgent they may seem.
    '...a violator of his word, a libertine over head and ears in debt and disgrace, a despiser of domestic ties, the companion of gamblers and demireps, a man who has just closed half a century without a single claim on the gratitude of his country or the respect of posterity...' - Leigh Hunt on the Prince Regent (later George IV).

  8. #21
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Paradise, Montana ... on
    Posts
    1,920
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Kevin Pearson View Post
    The only way you can appreciate Free Form Guitar is if you are higher then a kite. Since I haven't been that way in 40 years I just can't listen to it.
    Simply untrue. Masami Akita, better known by his stage name Merzbow, was only 13 years old when Kath recorded "Free Form Guitar". Merzbow had not yet released an album, but the genre of "noise music" (which can be a legitimate enough genre if one drops the "noise"!) had long been established as a viable form of musical expression. Even before there was a John Cage there were Dadist musicians. Luigi Russolo, an Italian Futurist artist of the very early 20th century, in his 1913 manifesto, L'Arte dei Rumori, translated as The Art of Noises, stated that the industrial revolution had given modern men a greater capacity to appreciate more complex sounds. I suppose if one is not "a modern man" maybe one cannot appreciate organized noise (or sound sculpting) as music. Even if noise is randomly selected, as in Cage works, it is organized by randomness. Why must music be restricted on one person's definition of organized tones in harmony, or whatever? The whole modern art movement has been a reaction against narrow definitions. And so is the entire history of art itself. There was a time when the bison was taken out of the field and chalked onto the wall of a cave. And I suspect that some Neanderthal of the time looked upon the image as so much tripe. Perhaps he thought if he chewed on some Henbane it might make sense. After all, bison were created to be killed and eaten, not painted onto walls. Right, modern man?

    I also admit to having an original 2-LP issue of Lou Reed's Metal Machine Music. I may prefer to listen to Bach Cantatas, Beethoven symphonies, or Boulez's piano music, but I won't deny that Lou Reed's musical offering lacks all merit or could be appreciated only while in a mentally unstable state. But then, I enjoy paintings by Jackson Pollock and Willem de Kooning. And I can honestly say I've never gotten "high" on either an illegal drug or an alcoholic beverage. I have gotten high on music -- of all sorts!

  9. #22
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2017
    Posts
    205
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Terry Kath was the heart and soul of Chicago. He was a man of his times too. There is no telling where he would be now if he had not died. I don't think he would be in Chicago. That said, I like to think he would have played occasionally with his old mates. Maybe even done an album or two with them.
    Kath was in the process of leaving Chicago at the time of his death. I can understand why. He wanted to PLAY! Do what he did best. CHICAGO was becoming way too constrictive to his spiritual muse of music. He was not happy being in the band. I don't want to knock Peter Cetera, he had become money for the group. Cetera and his wife were good friends withTerry and his wife.
    I think Kath was still feeling out the idea of going solo. It must have been scary for him to leave the cash cow Chicago had been. Bad habits and a self destructive streak caught up with Terry.
    I never bought another Chicago album after Terry Kath died. And I had them all.
    Last edited by KJ von NNJ; May-27-2018 at 03:51.

  10. #23
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2017
    Posts
    205
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Was Terry Kath the greatest rock guitar player? I don't think so. I don't think he would have liked to carry that burden. Nor do I think he thought he was.
    He was just a guy who caught lightening in a bottle for a precious few years. He amazed Jimi Hendrix, the wizard of rock guitar back in the day. Jimi met an early death at a young age too.
    Kath idolized Hendrix, like so many did.
    Terry Kath had soul and an amazing ability to play the guitar, all the more impressive because he was self taught. He was a brilliant guitar player. Jazz, hard rock. A great big voice, husky yet vulnerable. A man of great passion. ONE OF A KIND.
    Last edited by KJ von NNJ; May-27-2018 at 04:12.

  11. Likes laurie liked this post
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •