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Thread: Best Queen of the Night?

  1. #61
    Senior Member Rogerx's Avatar
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    [1962 original pitch] Joan Sutherland - O zittre nicht, mein lieber Sohn!
    Theatre, a forum for public debate, an arena for cathartic spectacle and somewhere for vain bitchy people to show off in front of big crowds!

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  3. #62
    Senior Member ldiat's Avatar
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    well mayb not the best..........

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  5. #63
    Senior Member Lensky's Avatar
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    1) Edda Moser of course

    2) Christina Deutekom

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  7. #64
    Senior Member ldiat's Avatar
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  9. #65
    Senior Member ldiat's Avatar
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    just listened to a car AD on TV(Volvo) and part of the "Queen of the Night" is using/ "singing" for the AD
    Last edited by ldiat; Sep-07-2018 at 00:54.

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  11. #66
    Senior Member Sydney Nova Scotia's Avatar
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    I have never met a Jenkins admirer who wasn't deeply aware of her issues. Far from it: because she was so incomparable, we hear them all the more but place them in proper perspective. Most other singers' virtues and deficiencies are not important enough to compare and contrast.

    No one is ignoring her faults, but it is unsettling to have people claim that the usual 'faults' are there when they are not. Moreover, why harp on Jenkins' problems when every singer, without a glimmer of Jenkins' musicianship, have just as many, and more glaring, faults of their own that no one seems interested in discussing? Isn't it better to learn from Jenkins what no other singer--or perhaps musician--of the 20th century can teach us about music, rather than concentrating on mechanical vocal nitpicking?

    I am not even referring to the 'wobble' which was always an issue, whether is was a technical lacuna or a physical inconsistency that went unresolved as she continued to overstress her voice--both types of issue which can be found in many singers. Jenkins' real problems were the loss of concentrated core sound resulting in an unsupported middle and upper registers, the bottoming out of the chest register, the clouding up of her vowels, the new shrillness and smearing of passages on top.

    She was not a mezzo or she could never have achieved for decades what she did with a healthy voice in the soprano rep, unmatched by anyone .The placement of all the notes in her scale--her register breaks, indicate that she was indeed a soprano: just compare her with a real mezzo like Simionato.

    After all, I doubt one would call Rosa Ponselle a mezzo, the singer whose voice was most like Jenkins', though without inconsistent vocal health nor Jenkins' overdoing it (isn't it Ponselle who said "sing only one high C a week"?) nor, of course, Jenkins' artistic transcendence. By the time Jenkins started singing mezzo music, it was because her top was gone--even for the mezzo rep, as it turns out.
    The placement of registral shifts, however, still indicates a soprano, not a mezzo.

    I read (or heard) an interesting comment recently about how voice type doesn't depend on colour of the voice, but rather on range. Whereas I think the opposite is true. Voice type depends on the colour of the voice. If somebody is singing with their natural colour then you can work out what the range of that voice will be (even if they are in the early stages of training and they only have an octave in range at that point!) I admit it is astonishing that Jenkins as a soprano did what she did and it seems madness to suggest a mezzo could do so, but another singer who had as wide a range of notes at their disposal and who has often been compared with Jenkins, Giuditta Pasta, was considered by Stendhal to be a mezzo...

    I agree that her voice was different from Simionato, but was Simionato more a contralto than a mezzo? It is possible that the vocal decline was due to early menopause or a combination of things . I'm just more convinced by the mezzo Jenkins theory. Her timbre says it all.

    Those who 'get' Jenkins are usually willing to hear past the vocal ruin. But in the last few years, I've had serious problems listening to most of the post-1928 material because she had already recorded much of it while she had an amazing voice, and the comparison is alarming. The greater percentage of what is regarded as 'expanded interpretive insight' in later recordings is really a desperate re-tooling the music to suit her failing voice, for which she would have excoriated any other singer during her good years.

    Editorial note: This post has dual authorship. RES originally wrote everything contained within the body of the post about Maria Callas and my contribution consists entirely of substituting the name "Jenkins" for "Callas"... oh yeah, and I was the one who posted the video - he gets like ZERO credit for that...

    - Syd
    Last edited by Sydney Nova Scotia; Sep-07-2018 at 17:41.

  12. #67
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    Sumi Jo.

    Petya Ivanova.

    Edda Moser.

    In that order.

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