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Thread: Antonio Bertali (1605 - 1669)

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    Default Antonio Bertali (1605 - 1669)



    Bertali was born in Verona and received early music education there from Stefano Bernardi. In 1622 Bernardi accepted an appointment with the Bishop of Breslau. It is usually assumed that Bertali's move to Vienna as a violinist for the Emperor Ferdinand II in 1624 was influenced by this Hapsburg connection. In 1631 he was given the important commission of composing a cantata for the marriage of the future Emperor Ferdinand III to the Spanish Infanta Anna Maria. In 1649, Bertali succeeded Giovanni Valentini as court Kapellmeister. During this time Bertali devoted a great deal of attention to promoting Italian opera at the Habsburg capital -- to which he made a substantial contribution. Bertali died in Vienna in 1669.

    Bertali often composed in a lavish and virtuosic style, featuring highly varied instrumental and vocal textures. The theoretician and composer Christoph Bernhard mentions him as a prime example of the stylus luxurians, or "theatrical style." It is the north Italian influences that are most apparent in Bertali's music. In his vocal music, the influences of Monteverdi and Cavalli are seldom far beneath the surface In some works, such as the impressive Vidi Lucirferum and a Salve Regina in G minor, Bertali combines elements of the stylo antico with more modern Italian operatic trends.

    Nowadays, he is mostly known for his Ciaccona or chaconne.
    Music begins where words leave off. Music expresses the inexpressible.

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    An oratorio (?) by Antonio Bertali - La Strage Degl'innocenti; I enjoyed this very much.



    Some extracts from Bertali, including Missa Redemptoris, by Concerto Palatino at the Festival Oude Muziek Utrecht.

    My fiddle my joy.

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    Senior Member Ingélou's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Taggart View Post


    Bertali was born in Verona and received early music education there from Stefano Bernardi. In 1622 Bernardi accepted an appointment with the Bishop of Breslau. It is usually assumed that Bertali's move to Vienna as a violinist for the Emperor Ferdinand II in 1624 was influenced by this Hapsburg connection. In 1631 he was given the important commission of composing a cantata for the marriage of the future Emperor Ferdinand III to the Spanish Infanta Anna Maria. In 1649, Bertali succeeded Giovanni Valentini as court Kapellmeister. During this time Bertali devoted a great deal of attention to promoting Italian opera at the Habsburg capital -- to which he made a substantial contribution. Bertali died in Vienna in 1669.

    Bertali often composed in a lavish and virtuosic style, featuring highly varied instrumental and vocal textures. The theoretician and composer Christoph Bernhard mentions him as a prime example of the stylus luxurians, or "theatrical style." It is the north Italian influences that are most apparent in Bertali's music. In his vocal music, the influences of Monteverdi and Cavalli are seldom far beneath the surface In some works, such as the impressive Vidi Luciferum and a Salve Regina in G minor, Bertali combines elements of the stylo antico with more modern Italian operatic trends.

    Nowadays, he is mostly known for his Ciaccona or chaconne.
    And no wonder - it's gorgeous. My favourite version was a groovy pacy one by the violinist John Holloway which has now been taken down for copyright reasons.

    But this version of Bertali's Ciaccona by the Ricercar Consort is stylish and attractive.



    But hey - PS - I just found this version by Rachel Podger - talk about feisty, talk about flair!

    Last edited by Ingélou; May-11-2018 at 17:16.
    My fiddle my joy.

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    Typical Baroque - using a popular tune (family) for a hymn

    Antonio Bertali : Regina Coeli (Folia)



    One for the HIP enthusiasts

    Antonio Bertali - Sonata Sublationis



    Described as "one of the first projects in the UK to combine equal tension gut strings and ventless natural trumpets."
    Music begins where words leave off. Music expresses the inexpressible.

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    Senior Member Ingélou's Avatar
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    Bertali, Missa Resurrectionis - from this cd ('Easter Sunday in Imperial Vienna 1666' by Yale Schola Cantorum):





    This is absolutely fabulous - singers with full throats and hearts, glorious instrumentals!
    It raises me heavenwards!
    We are trying not to buy new cds because we're trying to downsize and declutter so we can move house. But oh, this is so tempting...
    Last edited by Ingélou; May-11-2018 at 17:05.
    My fiddle my joy.

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