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Thread: Symphonic Prelude in E major

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    Senior Member dzc4627's Avatar
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    Default Symphonic Prelude in E major

    I am happy to present a new piece of mine which I've just recently submitted to a contest. It was conceived of as a sonata for cello and piano, but as many of ideas tend to be, the music was too large for that medium. I decided to orchestrate the beginning of this cello sonata that I was writing and found the character translated wonderfully to the orchestra, which I can now understand the ideas were truly conceived for.

    The audio: https://ufile.io/sjlh7
    The score: Orchestral Prelude in E Major - Full Score.pdf

    It's largely an homage to Anton Bruckner (and by proxy the language of Richard Wagner), and his divinely empowered style that I find infinitely inspiring. The debt to Bach though, as well, is clear I would hope, as in this piece I am very economical with motives and most of the music is dwelling on the themes presented in the first few bars. As Bruckner and Bach would both very often do, I invert, diminutive, augment, and further transform my motives and themes which propels forward the growth of the piece.

    It is a sort of condensed first movement (in a monothematic sonata form, with the recapitulation coinciding with the Coda) of what could be a symphony. I say condensed as there was a time limit for the contest and I had to be brief. Ideally this work would span fifteen minutes at least, with fully fledged secondary and perhaps tertiary theme groups, and a clear recapitulation.

    The title of the piece is almost arbitrary, and given the "first movement" character of the work I chose to avoid naming the piece anything that might evoke anything at all.
    Last edited by dzc4627; May-26-2018 at 09:51.

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    What program do you use?

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    I'm listening right now, and I think it does fine as a piece on its own. I don't think it has enough material in terms of melody/theming to be extended into a longer piece, it feels perfect as is.

    Good Work!

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    Senior Member Phil loves classical's Avatar
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    I can definitely hear Bruckner. I would think there should be more of an intro before the theme. A 2nd theme would be nice and make the transitions more interesting.
    "Forgive me, Majesty. I'm a vulgar man. But I assure you, my music is not.“ Mozart

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    Senior Member dzc4627's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Phil loves classical View Post
    I can definitely hear Bruckner. I would think there should be more of an intro before the theme. A 2nd theme would be nice and make the transitions more interesting.
    I personally enjoy the immediacy of the main theme. Even an extra bar of tremolo would feel excessive and ruin the metric regularity I have going throughout nearly all of the piece.

    Technically there is a secondary section as in a sonata form. It is in B major, the dominant of E as is convention. However, it's just a restatement of the main theme in the dominant key which is a favored method of Haydn in his symphonies and string quartets. To quote myself, "Ideally this work would span fifteen minutes at least, with fully fledged secondary and perhaps tertiary theme groups, and a clear recapitulation." The original cello sonata did indeed have an expansive and contrasting secondary theme group but for this contest I had to condense my ambitions, and thus decided it would be best to focus intensely on only one group of themes.

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    Senior Member MarkMcD's Avatar
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    Hi dzc,

    I think this stands a good chance at being placed in the competition. It has some wonderful textures that look very simple on the page but that have a very rich and full sound, giving the piece a very cinematic feel.

    Do you plan on finishing the piece as you originally wanted? I can easily imagine the cello taking up those themes and elevating them to new heights. I think in fact that that is what is needed possibly. I know it's a prelude and wonderful as it is, it does feel very much like there should be more, it is the prelude that promises the next phase, and that's what I'd also love to hear.


    I always love to hear new classically structured tonal music, and as always you do a great job of it.

    Best regards
    Mark

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    Senior Member dzc4627's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by E Cristobal Poveda View Post
    What program do you use?
    Sibelius with Noteperformer play back. I highly recommend Noteperformer!

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    Quote Originally Posted by dzc4627 View Post
    Sibelius with Noteperformer play back. I highly recommend Noteperformer!
    Thanks! I have a hard time finding playback software that remotely sounds realistic.
    The brass timbre on your Noteperformer sounds perfect for romantic works!

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    Senior Member dzc4627's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MarkMcD View Post
    Hi dzc,

    I think this stands a good chance at being placed in the competition. It has some wonderful textures that look very simple on the page but that have a very rich and full sound, giving the piece a very cinematic feel.

    Do you plan on finishing the piece as you originally wanted? I can easily imagine the cello taking up those themes and elevating them to new heights. I think in fact that that is what is needed possibly. I know it's a prelude and wonderful as it is, it does feel very much like there should be more, it is the prelude that promises the next phase, and that's what I'd also love to hear.


    I always love to hear new classically structured tonal music, and as always you do a great job of it.

    Best regards
    Mark
    Thank you, Mark! I appreciate it.

    Whether or not I finish it (put it into the scope of a full sonata form movement) is still undecided. The piece as it is highlights the most structurally important moments of what would be a sonata form. My main hangup is how derivative of Bruckner it is. Any seasoned Brucknerian will hear what I mean... however, it seems that we disciples of the Master are far and few, and perhaps my carrying on of his methods is indeed a valiant effort that I ought to continue.

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    Senior Member MarkMcD's Avatar
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    Bruckner, at least for a time, was heavily influenced by Wagner, and Liszt for example, but he wasn't either, and the music, although reminiscent, was his own. Taking elements, methods and inspiration from others has always and will always go on. To copy or to imitate is neither good nor useful, but to try to continue and use as inspiration, ideas from the greats, is a valiant and worthwhile endeavour in my opinion. Not always done successfully it has to be said, but I think as long as there is a conscious effort to not imitate, but to use those tools in your own manner, then those that complain, have not understood the purpose.

    You are right, I'm not a great disciple of Bruckner, and I don't hear what you hear in that respect, but the music is good, and it is not Bruckner.

    Just keep doing what you're doing if it is making you happy, that is the only reason to keep doing what we do. If someone else likes it then that's a bonus, and if they don't, hey, that's fine too.

    I'm quite sure you didn't need this pep talk, but I just felt like giving it, hope you don't mind lol.

    Kind regards
    Mark

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    Senior Member dzc4627's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MarkMcD View Post
    Bruckner, at least for a time, was heavily influenced by Wagner, and Liszt for example, but he wasn't either, and the music, although reminiscent, was his own. Taking elements, methods and inspiration from others has always and will always go on. To copy or to imitate is neither good nor useful, but to try to continue and use as inspiration, ideas from the greats, is a valiant and worthwhile endeavour in my opinion. Not always done successfully it has to be said, but I think as long as there is a conscious effort to not imitate, but to use those tools in your own manner, then those that complain, have not understood the purpose.

    You are right, I'm not a great disciple of Bruckner, and I don't hear what you hear in that respect, but the music is good, and it is not Bruckner.

    Just keep doing what you're doing if it is making you happy, that is the only reason to keep doing what we do. If someone else likes it then that's a bonus, and if they don't, hey, that's fine too.

    I'm quite sure you didn't need this pep talk, but I just felt like giving it, hope you don't mind lol.

    Kind regards
    Mark
    Quite a pep talk it was, Mark! While most of it is already part of my core philosophy, it is great to hear it affirmed from a very talented fellow.

    Thanks!

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