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Thread: Latest concerts

  1. #616
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    Sounds amazing!

  2. #617
    Senior Member Radames's Avatar
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    The Christmas lull is finally coming to an end. I braved the cold - and it was COLD!!- and went to Ottawa last night to hear :


    Marc Neikrug: Bassoon Concerto
    Carl Nielsen: Little Suite
    Schumann Symphony No. 3, “Rhenish”

    Hall was only half full at most. Too cold maybe. I wasn't crazy about the Neikrug, but it didn't give me a headache. It's always good to here the great Dane and I really wanted to hear the Rhenish because I miss the Albany Symphony to it last season when my car died.

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  4. #618
    Senior Member pianississimo's Avatar
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    Heard the second of my two concerts tonight. Loved every minute my very first concert was this orchestra, soloist and concerto so it was a nostalgia trip! Conductor was Alexandr Vedernikov who whipped the orchestra up into a frenzy in the Rachmaninov, this evidently pleased Nikolai Lugansky who played like a man possessed! Brilliant Tchaikovsky orchestral suite in the second half of the concert too. The orchestral suites don't get as much attention as his great symphonies but they're easily weighty enough for concert performance - especially this one which has a wonderful violin solo section. The lead violinist with the CBSO played it superbly.

    If you're in the UK you can listen to the concert as it was broadcast live on radio 3 and will be available on BBC iplayer radio for 3 weeks. If anyone knows how you can listen to these overseas could you please let me know.

    More music tomorrow. Lucky me

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  6. #619
    Senior Member pianississimo's Avatar
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    Fantastic chamber music this afternoon in Birmingham. I was glad to see the CBSO centre pretty much full for the cello adapted Franck sonata in A and the Brahms trio no 2 in C. CBSO players Byron Parish and David Powell appeared with Nikolai Lugansky. They can't have had all that long to prepare for such complex and demanding pieces but they were flawless. I especially enjoyed the Frank. It's one of my favourite duo sonatas and Lugansky recorded it with violinist Vadim Repin a couple of years ago. The Brahms surprised me. I have a recording of it by Barenboim and DuPres which should be great but I found it a bit pedestrian and bland. I'd like to appreciate Brahms more so I was pleased to find the live performance very lively and full of amazing detail. Gypsy themes combine with smooth harmonies and the whole thing is capped off by a soaring rondo which finishes the piece triumphantly. The three got a great response from the audience and it was well deserved. I'll be looking out for the two CBSO players in the repeat of Thursday's concert tomorrow.

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  8. #620
    Senior Member papsrus's Avatar
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    Went to a performance this afternoon by the Sarasota Orchestra led by conductor/music director Anu Tali, in her first full season leading the orchestra.

    Program:
    Strauss -- Death and Transfiguration
    Mozart -- Piano Concerto No. 21 in C major (Tamara Stefanovich, piano)
    Tchaikovsky -- Romeo and Juliet Fantasy Overture
    Ravel -- Suite No. 2 from Daphnis et Chloe


    The opening piece -- Death and Transfiguration -- was certainly played beautifully by the orchestra, but it begins so gently that it was a bit hard to grab hold of with the audience still settling in and rustling around a little bit.

    The piano concerto was delivered skillfully in the very capable hands of Stefanovich, with the orchestra parred down to near chamber size. It's a piece that allows a skilled pianist to show their stuff, and Stefanovich certainly did that.

    The Romeo and Juliet overture was fine, but felt perfunctory somehow. Beautiful music played with sensitivity, but nothing really stood out.

    The highlight for me was the Ravel, with full orchestra of about 90 strong navigating the shifting tempos with aplomb. Various sections of the orchestra each took their moment to shine, which I really enjoyed. The orchestra really played with assurance and muscle here. The audience that rustled a bit through Strauss was transfixed here.

    We're fortunate to have Tali leading the orchestra. She replaced a music director who had been at the helm for about 15 years.

    Overall a solid B+ performance, elevated by both the Mozart concerto and the Ravel.

    The theme of the concert, for those who haven't detected it yet from the pieces, was "In Love." All three performances were sold out, which is nice. Sat near the rear, center and the orchestra sounded great. Much more balanced than a previous concert where I was off to the right so that the cellos kind of had their backs to me, and so were somewhat lost to me. Center = better.
    Last edited by papsrus; Jan-12-2015 at 01:01.

  9. #621
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    Went to Norwich Baroque last night in St Peter Mancroft -a great barn of a place with an inefficient heating system - not up to an icy January evening.

    The concert was organised around a visit by Simon Munday a baroque trumpeter who plays with (among others) La Serenissima. Although the programme claimed he was playing on the Natural Trumpet, it was in fact a Baroque Trumpet - or modern copy with vent holes to allow easier playing of diatonic scales. Mr Munday demonstrated the pure harmonic series with the slightly odd notes but did not attempt to correct them with embouchure but rather with the vent holes to show the approximate sound of a true natural trumpet. Niggles apart, it was an impressive display.

    The first half was Telemann's Trumpet Concerto No 1 in D, Albinoni's Sinfonia in G Minor, the first of Hellendall's 6 Grand Concertos and concluded with Torelli's Trumpet Sonata in D. The music felt a little "thin" possibly because the players were feeling the cold, but it was a good start. As Mr Munday commented, Telemann may be less "complicated" than Bach but he has some delightful tunes and the Trumpet Concerto demonstrated that. Hellendall was a Dutchman who took over from Charles Burney at Kings Lynn before moving to Cambridge. His music has a freshness and spontaneity that delights the listener. Torelli wrote for the very large Bolognese church of San Petronio and his music certainly suited St Peter Mancroft.

    The second half began with the second of Corelli's op. 6 Concerti Grosso. This was excellently played. The group sounded much more confident and produced an excellent sound. The concluding piece was Telemann's Suite No. 1 for Trumpet and Strings where the trumpet was more of an orchestral instrument than a solo piece. This was twenty minutes of bliss with the strings, continuo (harpsichord and double bass) and trumpet weaving their way through a selection of dance tunes and airs. Utterly delightful.
    Music begins where words leave off. Music expresses the inexpressible.

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  11. #622
    Senior Member Pyotr's Avatar
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    Wife and I saw this last Friday, January 16th. She’s having a temporary situation with one of her feet, nothing serious, but we exchanged our normal seats for those in the handicap wheelchair section(for an extra $100). Best seats in the house. I’ve seen the Nutcracker ballet many times but to hear the Phil. Orchestra play it live was a real treat. Although I missed the ballerinas and expected them to pop out on to the stage. I was a little disappointed the orchestra didn’t play the last number, The Final Waltz, which is my favorite. That would have brought the house down. Nézet-Séguin, chose most of the numbers from the more narrative Act I passages rather the Act II dances. I ‘m not real familiar with Tchaikovsky’s 5th symphony. It sounded a little like a Brahms symphony to my novice ear. If you’re a Tchaikovsky’s fanatic, which I most definitely am, this was a night for you.

    PROGRAM
    Conductor - Yannick Nézet-Séguin
    1.Glazunov - "Winter," from The Seasons
    2.Tchaikovsky, selections from The Nutcracker
    -Clara and the Nutcracker
    -Battle Scene
    -A Pine Forest in Winter
    -Waltz of the Snowflakes
    -Pas de deux
    INTERMISSION
    3.Tchaikovsky - Symphony No. 5

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  13. #623
    Senior Member papsrus's Avatar
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    This afternoon:

    A chamber performance titled "Trumpet," featuring some of the principals of the Sarasota Orchestra -- although trumpets were featured only in the first, brief piece and the final piece. More on that below.

    I sat dead center, three rows back in the cozy 250-or-so seat hall.

    Program:
    Britten -- Fanfare for St. Edmunsbury
    Mendelssohn -- Piano Trio No. 1 in D minor, Op. 49
    Strauss -- Serenade in E flat major, Op. 7
    Vivaldi -- Concerto for Two Trumpets in C major, RV 537

    The Britten is a short call and response piece. For this performance one trumpet was positioned center stage, one trumpet was in the upper right balcony at the side of the stage, the third was in the upper left balcony at the other side of the stage. Very effective for this brief intro piece, which also includes some nice polyphony with all three trumpets. Short, sweet.

    The Mendelssohn was the standout. Piano, cello, violin. I've heard the violinist, Jennifer Best Takeda, in another string quartet she performs with in a local church here and she's wonderful. This was, to me, the best music of the afternoon, played with real sensitivity and passion. I was pleased but curious as to why it was included in a performance ostensibly devoted to trumpet / brass / woodwind pieces. Nonetheless, the packed house ate this one up, bursting into a brief, spontaneous (but frowned upon) round of applause after the first movement. Beautiful melodies with the melodic lines passed around among the instruments, then developed, then returned to again and passed around. I'll have to listen to this piece again.

    The Strauss was performed by a 13-piece ensemble, all woodwinds with french horns. Particularly enjoyed paying attention to the bassoon and contrabassoon players as they provided what could almost be described as a little funk to the proceedings. Another brief piece -- perhaps 10 minutes.

    They wheeled out a harpsichord for the Vivaldi, and a string ensemble of perhaps 12 players backed the principal and co-principal trumpet players from the orchestra for this piece. The principals played beautifully together. The one disappointment was that the harpsichord was barely audible. I had high hopes for this but they positioned the instrument so that it was pointing straight out toward the audience rather than sideways, as they typically do with a piano. And it was in the center-back of the ensemble. Maybe this is typical, I don't know. They must have thought about this, but the instrument was mostly lost behind the trumpets, certainly, and the strings on either side.

    All in all, Mendelssohn's piano trio gets an A. The rest fell somewhere short that fine performance, but very enjoyable nonetheless.
    Wired for hound

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  15. #624
    Senior Member senza sordino's Avatar
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    Last night I went to the symphony with my parents. Since we bought tickets at different times we didn't sit together, but we had drinks before and at the intermission, and I bought them dinner before. My parents are doing quite well, they're only 20 years older than me, and I'm 50 this yr. We all be in a retirement home together soon enough.

    The concert: Vancouver Symphony Orchestra, Guest conductor Ben Gernon from the UK, young and very talented.

    Nielsen Aladdin Suite.
    Shostakovich Piano Concerto #2 with soloist Kirill Gerstein
    Sibelius Symphony #5

    I thoroughly enjoyed the show, especially the Aladdin Suite. I've heard it before, but to see it performed was thrilling, especially part five with several different rhythms and tunes simultaneously. The Shostakovich was fine. The Sibelius I know so well, because I've performed it with my little local orchestra. I thought Ben Gernon took those five final chords a bit fast, but otherwise terrifically done.

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  17. #625
    Senior Member PeteW's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by senza sordino View Post
    Last night I went to the symphony with my parents. Since we bought tickets at different times we didn't sit together, but we had drinks before and at the intermission, and I bought them dinner before. My parents are doing quite well, they're only 20 years older than me, and I'm 50 this yr. We all be in a retirement home together soon enough.

    The concert: Vancouver Symphony Orchestra, Guest conductor Ben Gernon from the UK, young and very talented.

    Nielsen Aladdin Suite.
    Shostakovich Piano Concerto #2 with soloist Kirill Gerstein
    Sibelius Symphony #5

    I thoroughly enjoyed the show, especially the Aladdin Suite. I've heard it before, but to see it performed was thrilling, especially part five with several different rhythms and tunes simultaneously. The Shostakovich was fine. The Sibelius I know so well, because I've performed it with my little local orchestra. I thought Ben Gernon took those five final chords a bit fast, but otherwise terrifically done.
    Sounds excellent.
    That Shostakovich is one of my real favourites, always has been.
    Should be seeing my own parents in a couple of weeks (they're in Glasgow).

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  19. #626
    Senior Member Radames's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by senza sordino View Post
    Last night I went to the symphony with my parents. Since we bought tickets at different times we didn't sit together, but we had drinks before and at the intermission, and I bought them dinner before. My parents are doing quite well, they're only 20 years older than me, and I'm 50 this yr. We all be in a retirement home together soon enough.

    The concert: Vancouver Symphony Orchestra, Guest conductor Ben Gernon from the UK, young and very talented.

    Nielsen Aladdin Suite.
    Shostakovich Piano Concerto #2 with soloist Kirill Gerstein
    Sibelius Symphony #5

    I thoroughly enjoyed the show, especially the Aladdin Suite. I've heard it before, but to see it performed was thrilling, especially part five with several different rhythms and tunes simultaneously. The Shostakovich was fine. The Sibelius I know so well, because I've performed it with my little local orchestra. I thought Ben Gernon took those five final chords a bit fast, but otherwise terrifically done.
    Argg! Sibelius 5th! that's the one I missed last week when I couldn't get off work in time to get to Hartford.

    Over the weekend I got to hear the Elgar Violin Concerto with the young violinist violinist Elena Urioste. She played great. I hope to see more of her.

    10476089_771215982951995_1959173898484613621_o.jpg

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  21. #627
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    Quote Originally Posted by senza sordino View Post
    Last night I went to the symphony with my parents. Since we bought tickets at different times we didn't sit together, but we had drinks before and at the intermission, and I bought them dinner before. My parents are doing quite well, they're only 20 years older than me, and I'm 50 this yr. We all be in a retirement home together soon enough.

    The concert: Vancouver Symphony Orchestra, Guest conductor Ben Gernon from the UK, young and very talented.

    Nielsen Aladdin Suite.
    Shostakovich Piano Concerto #2 with soloist Kirill Gerstein
    Sibelius Symphony #5

    I thoroughly enjoyed the show, especially the Aladdin Suite. I've heard it before, but to see it performed was thrilling, especially part five with several different rhythms and tunes simultaneously. The Shostakovich was fine. The Sibelius I know so well, because I've performed it with my little local orchestra. I thought Ben Gernon took those five final chords a bit fast, but otherwise terrifically done.
    That's good and funny.

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  23. #628
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    Er, I'm off to hear a guitarist and I don't even know what he's performing. Adventurous or stupid!!???!!

  24. #629
    Senior Member PeteW's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gog View Post
    Er, I'm off to hear a guitarist and I don't even know what he's performing. Adventurous or stupid!!???!!
    Adventurous...
    I take it you know who the guitarist is?

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  26. #630
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    Hey, it's gotta be better than Seinfeld and Cheers reruns.

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