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Thread: Latest concerts

  1. #91
    Senior Member Sid James's Avatar
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    Default Concert Reviews

    I can't find the "Latest Concerts" thread, so I thought I'd create this one. A thread where you can post upcoming concerts & your own reviews of them...
    Genuine ersatz classical listener since 1981.

    Winner: TC Provider of Extraneous Information Award, 2012.

  2. #92
    Senior Member Sid James's Avatar
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    A concert I just went to on the weekend:

    The Bourbaki Ensemble

    Conductor: David Angell

    Soloist: Ken Burnett, clarinet



    A free concert hosted by Macquarie University as part of the Music on Winter Sundays series.
    Bourbaki Ensemble

    The Bourbaki Ensemble is a chamber string orchestra based in Newtown, Sydney. Their aim is to perform works from the string orchestra repertoire.

    The Bourbaki winter program highlights two of the great works of the English string repertoire, and also includes a variety of Australian compositions as well as continuing to feature a work by Charles Ives, the Ensemble's composer of the year.

    PROGRAM

    Ralph Vaughan Williams: Fantasia on a Theme by Thomas Tallis

    Gustav Holst: St. Paul's Suite

    Andrew Ford: Oma Kodu for clarinet and string orchestra (Ken Burnett, clarinet)

    Wayne Dixon: Mermaids

    Charles Ives: Hymn

    Richard Willgoss: General Bourbaki Rings the Changes

    Chris Williams: Altjiranga Mitjina

    Review:

    I really enjoyed this concert. 3 of the composers were there for the premieres of their works. Wayne Dixon's mermaids could sometimes be enticing, but there was also a dark side. There were shades of Berg & Richard Strauss there. Richard Willgoss' piece incuded an interesting difference: the vioinists left the stage & played around the audience - the sound was amazing. This piece had the rhythms and sequences of bells ringing their changes. Andrew Ford's piece was based on an Estonian folk song, and had this earthy European feel. It reminded me a bit of Golijov's clarinet quintet, which I saw in concert a few weeks back (but that had a Jewish feel). The Ives was an amazing piece, lasting only 3 minutes. Chris Williams' piece sounded a bit like another Australian minimalist, Ross Edwards (but even more minimalistic?). The two English composers were served well too, the Holst played very vigorously, and the Vaughan Williams was quite spiritual ("the best piece for string orchestra" as David Angell, the conductor, said). All up, an excellent program, and I will definitely go to more of their concerts in the future (they have been around in Sydney for about 10 years, but I had never heard of them before this). I think they can easily give the Australian Chamber Orchestra or Metropolitan Chamber Orchestra a run for their money (although those are excellent ensembles as well), for one - they play more contemporary repertoire by living composers.
    Genuine ersatz classical listener since 1981.

    Winner: TC Provider of Extraneous Information Award, 2012.

  3. #93
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    I can't find the "Latest Concerts" thread
    Yeah, it seem to be gone.

    WHO DELETED BY SWEET, INNOCENT THREAD?

    WICKED STAFF I KNEW THEY WILL DISCRIMINATE ME FOR BEING HETEROSEXUAL

  4. #94
    Administrator Krummhorn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andre View Post
    I can't find the "Latest Concerts" thread, so I thought I'd create this one. A thread where you can post upcoming concerts & your own reviews of them...
    Quote Originally Posted by Aramis View Post
    Yeah, it seem to be gone.
    Sorry about that ... it was being infested by spammers and had to be temporarily taken "offline".

    This scenario happens occasionally to random threads ... sorry for the inconvenience.
    It's back now, everything's there as it was.

    Damn the spammers :angry:!!
    Kh
    Administrator


  5. #95
    Senior Member HarpsichordConcerto's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andre View Post

    A free concert hosted by Macquarie University as part of the Music on Winter Sundays series.
    Next time there is a free classical concert in this city, please PM me about it if that's not too much trouble! I might want to go. You seem to know more about what's going on regarding these events.

  6. #96
    Senior Member Sid James's Avatar
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    I just went to a concert on the weekend here in Sydney, which was a tribute to Ken Tribe, who died a few weeks ago (he was 96). This guy was one of the main behind the scenes people who brought things like Musica Viva to Australia (& secured government funding, etc. to many groups) in the early days following World War Two. He was a lawyer by profession but was really passionate about classical music. He didn't want a funeral, but a free concert like this, to celebrate & showcase the kind of talents that he spent most of his life supporting.

    http://www.musicaviva.com.au/concertseason/kentribe

    This was a great tribute to a man I didn't know that much about. The host was Australian composer & director of Musica Viva Australia Carl Vine. Ken Tribe's family & friends payed tribute to him, as did NSW Governor Marie Bashir. Some of his favourite ensembles played music, such as the Australia Ensemble, Pinchgut Opera, Gondwana Choir, the Selby piano trio, and the Goldner String Quartet. Some of the composers featured were locals Peter Sculthorpe, Lyn Williams, Ross Edwards and also classics like Purcell, Beethoven, Dvorak and Mozart. I enjoyed this tribute and I feel Australian classical music is and has been made the much richer by dedicated behind the scenes people like Tribe, who are not interested in the spotlight, but actually getting things done, and supporting, nurturing and enlivening the classical music scene and culture across this country.
    Genuine ersatz classical listener since 1981.

    Winner: TC Provider of Extraneous Information Award, 2012.

  7. #97
    Senior Member Sid James's Avatar
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    Before the Ken Tribe tribute, I went to an organ recital at St. Stephen's Anglican Church, Willoughby. The organist was Jean-Baptiste Monnot, professor at the Paris Conservatoire (he's only 26). I'm beginning to enjoy organ music, and I enjoyed the program (I would have liked some French works as well, but it was still very good). I was really surprised how much like Bach the Mozart sounded.

    J.S. Bach - Prelude and Fugue in A Minor
    R. Schumann - Four Sketches
    W.A. Mozart (trans. Jean Guillou) - Adagio and Fugue KV 546
    Genuine ersatz classical listener since 1981.

    Winner: TC Provider of Extraneous Information Award, 2012.

  8. #98
    Senior Member Sid James's Avatar
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    I just went to a free lecture & recital at Sydney Conservatorium of Music:

    http://www.usyd.edu.au/news/music/78...1&eventid=5213

    Dr Martin Jarvis, an expert in musical manuscript forensics argued that J.S. Bach's second wife, Anna Magdalena, was much more than a mere copyist. By showing and discussing samples of the original manuscripts, and demonstrating what techniques are used in his science, he argued that J.S. Bach's Cello Suites were most likely composed by his wife, not him. I didn't even know that this area of scientific research existed, so I learned a lot from this lecture. After the lecture, the audience enjoyed a performance of the first two cello suites by Korean-Australian cellist Minah Choe, who is currently doing her doctorate at the Con. This was part of the Alfred Hook lecture series, and I can recommend anyone in Sydney to attend these - there are ones coming up by Roy Howat, Peter Sculthorpe and Andrew Ford. Just check the con's website for details...
    Genuine ersatz classical listener since 1981.

    Winner: TC Provider of Extraneous Information Award, 2012.

  9. #99
    Senior Member Sid James's Avatar
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    Here in Sydney on Sunday:

    Sydney Youth Philharmonic Orchestra
    Conductor: Brian Buggy OAM
    @ Blessed Sacrament Church, Mosman

    Wagner - Prelude: Die Meistersinger von Nurnberg
    Tchaikovsky - "Sleeping Beauty" Ballet Suite Op. 66a
    Buggy - Nursery Rhyme arrangements
    Buggy - Suite for Strings
    Tchaikovsky - Symphony No. 2 in C minor, Op. 17 "Little Russian"
    (Encore) J. Williams - "Indiana Jones" Film Suite

    This was a good program, and some of it was just really fun. I think the classics were interpreted and played very energetically and vigorously. Conductor Brian Buggy's suite was also interesting, it reminded me a bit of Vaughan Williams or Villa-Lobos in string mode. It was great for me to hear the "Little Russian" after not hearing it for 10 years. & the "Indiana Jones" was a nice finale. We have about 9 youth orchestras here in Sydney, and with their dedication & conductors as good as Buggy, they play to a very high standard (& I think their programs are more interesting, too)...
    Genuine ersatz classical listener since 1981.

    Winner: TC Provider of Extraneous Information Award, 2012.

  10. #100
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    Just saw Tristan and Isolde in Seattle. I have extremely mixed opinions of the performance and the opera itself. I loved it for the first 2 acts and then got a little bored. The opera could've been a good hour or two shorter considering its material perhaps, but I think I was distracted by my hunger and tiredness after sitting at McCaw Hall for 5 hours soon after a 5 hour car ride.

    Got an AMAZING seat though, and the orchestra was fabulous 99% of the time!

  11. #101
    Senior Member Sid James's Avatar
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    Last night @ Sydney Conservatorium of Music:

    Cocktail Hour Recital Series
    "French Violin"
    Goetz Richter, violin
    Jeanell Carrigan, piano

    C. Franck - Sonata in A Major
    M. Ravel - Sonata in A Minor (Sonate Posthume)
    C. Debussy - Sonata in G minor

    As violinist Goetz Richter pointed out, Franck was only nominally French, but he lived most of his life there. Both performers are on the teaching staff of the Conservatorium. I liked how Richter had this very energetic and passionate style - I know nothing about violin playing, but I could tell from his body movements that he was very involved (& their interpretation, of course). So maybe that's why I liked this rendering of the Franck, as (at times) in the past, I have felt his music to be a little too sombre and dark - but here he sounded lighter and more animated. The Ravel was an early work, from the 1890's when he was still in the grip of his teacher Faure's style, and I was a little annoyed with the repetition of the single theme (it was in one movement). I really enjoyed the concluding Debussy, no wonder since I've known it for 10 years. This is a work strongly on the cusp of neo-classicism, Boulez said he admired it for it's simplicity, but I think that it can also be very passionate, as it was done here. I enjoyed this recital and I will be going back for more (for people in Sydney, they usually do two of them on a Monday night, one at around 6 the other at 7.30 - check the con's website)...
    Genuine ersatz classical listener since 1981.

    Winner: TC Provider of Extraneous Information Award, 2012.

  12. #102
    Senior Member Sid James's Avatar
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    Just came back from a concert here at Sydney University's Great Hall:

    The University of Sydney Graduate Choir & Wind Ensemble
    Christopher Bowen OAM, conductor/musical director

    G. Gabrieli - Canzona, Sinfonia, Sonata for brass; Motets for choir, organ & brass
    A. Bruckner - Ecce sacerdos magnus (motet); Mass in E minor

    I enjoyed this concert, it was a good pairing of two composers, the earlier one influencing the later one. It was the first time ever that I had heard any works by Gabrieli, and I found them interesting. I have known the Bruckner mass for years. The concluding Agnus Dei is the most ambigious and soul-searching conclusion to any mass that I have heard. It was also the first time I have heard this ensemble, and they were pretty good imo...
    Genuine ersatz classical listener since 1981.

    Winner: TC Provider of Extraneous Information Award, 2012.

  13. #103
    Senior Member Sid James's Avatar
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    Continuum Sax, Match Percussion with guests Natsuko Yoshimoto and Roland Peelman

    Last Blues
    Eugene Goossens Hall, ABC Centre Ultimo

    Performers: Natsuko Yoshimoto - Violin, Daryl Pratt and Alison Eddington - Percussion, Margery Smith, James Nightingale, Martin Kay, Jarrod Whitbourn - Saxophones and Roland Peelman - Conductor

    This was an excellent concert. The program was as follows:

    Gyorgy Ligeti - 6 Bagatelles for saxophone quartet (arr. Fabio Oehrli)
    Margery Smith - Lost Blues for saxophone quartet and percussion duo (World Premiere)
    Mary Finsterer - IONIA for saxophone quartet and percussion (Premiere of new version)
    Chun Ting Pang - In Different Spaces for percussion duo
    Matthew Hindson - Song of Life for solo violin
    Brian Howard - Last Blues for solo violin, saxophone quartet and percussion duo (World Premiere)

    I really enjoyed seeing the two percssionists (who are a couple in real life) playing all of their various interesting instruments. All the pieces were interesting. The Ligeti was a great opener, very virtuosic and bright. The highlight of the evening was the premiere of Brian Howard's Last Blues, virtually a concerto for all of the musicians. It was based on Cesare Pavase's poem of that name & every player was a soloist in this piece. There were cadenzas for the saxes, the violin, and the two percussionists. It had much lyricism and poetry, but also some dissonance and darkness. Three of the composers were there on the night.

    Another concert I went to during the week:

    Frozen Improvisations - in memoriam of Niels Viggo Bentzon (1919-2000)

    Georg Pedersen, cello
    Tonya Lemoh, piano

    Recital Hall West, Sydney Conservatorium of Music

    Sonata for Solo Cello Op. 110 (1956) (Sydney premiere)
    Traesnit for solo piano Op. 65
    Sonata for Cello and Piano Op. 43 (1947) (Australian premiere)

    I had never heard the music of this Danish composer before. My first impression was that there were elements of minimalism as well as a kind of romanticism in his music. The colours of the solo piano piece were pretty amazing, and there were many repeats (at least for the piano part) in the Sonata for Cello & Piano. Both of the musicians played excellently...
    Genuine ersatz classical listener since 1981.

    Winner: TC Provider of Extraneous Information Award, 2012.

  14. #104
    Senior Member Sid James's Avatar
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    Went to two concert in the past few days:

    Julian Day - An Infinity Room
    Recital Hall East, Conservatorium of Music, Sydney

    Music on Winter Sundays - The Occasionally Performing Sinfonia (TOPS)
    Macquarie Theatre, Macquarie University, Sydney
    Conductors: Mal Hewitt; Steven Hillinger (Shostakovich)

    Wagner - Prelude to Act 1 of Lohengrin
    Mahler - Adagietto from 5th Symphony
    Chausson - Poeme for Violin and Orchestra (Soloist - Richard Pulley)
    Shostakovich - Symphony No. 5 in D minor

    Julian Day's music is very minimalistic. The main half hour (or so) work after the interval of this concert, called Ceremony, featured Day and three other musicians on electronic keyboards. They successively placed and changed heavy screws onto the keys, which sustained the notes and created a drone-like sound. It was good to hear four keyboards going at once - the sound was quite hypnotic and mesmerising. It was probably the type of music that's more engaging live than it would be on a recording.

    The TOPS concert was fantastic. There were about 500 people in the theatre. All the works were performed well, but the highlights were violinist Richard Pulley's soulful and turbulent rendition of the Chausson Poeme & a very dramatic interpretation of the Shostakovich, which perhaps the most ironic reading of the finale which I have heard. This was perhaps the most "angst-ridden" program (as conductor Mal Hewitt joked), but the way it was presented by the two conductors made it very accessible. This is a voluntary orchestra (no-one gets paid a cent), but their performance was spirited and committed. This very fittingly brought to a close the free Macquarie Uni series, and I look forward to going to more next year. I think it's great that the uni is attempting to be inclusive and welcome people from all levels of society to enjoy the richness of the classical repertoire.

    It was the first time I had seen either of these two groups perform...
    Genuine ersatz classical listener since 1981.

    Winner: TC Provider of Extraneous Information Award, 2012.

  15. #105
    Senior Member Sid James's Avatar
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    Went to this one yesterday with a friend:

    Tatiana Kolesova, piano
    Blessed Sacrament Church, Mosman, Sydney

    Chopin - Four Ballades, "Heroic" Polonaise
    Ravel - Valses Nobles et Sentimentales
    Nicolai Kapustin (b. 1937) - Sonata No. 2 Op. 54 (1989)

    This was the first solo piano recital I had attended for 20 years. The pianist is on a tour here from Russia. She was of a very high standard, having won 2nd prize (out of 250 applicants) in the Sydney International Piano Competition in 2008. The Chopin was lyrical, dramatic and song-like, the Ravel was witty and light, and the Kapustin work was full of the blues (unusual for a Ukranian?) and reminded me of Ives (the notes say that he was influenced by Gershwin, but there was a 12 note row in the final movement). All up, some good variety and a very enjoyable recital.
    Genuine ersatz classical listener since 1981.

    Winner: TC Provider of Extraneous Information Award, 2012.

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