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Thread: Latest concerts

  1. #106
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    I was at the penultimate Night of the Proms last Saturday: Monteverdi's Vespers 1610 performed by English Baroque Solists/Montevedi Choir/His Majestys Sagbutts and Cornetts conducted by Sir John Eliot Gardner.

    Altogether, I attended 12 evening concerts at the Albert Hall, and 4 chamber music concerts at Cadogan Hall. This is a record for me in the 10 years I have been regularly attending the Proms.

    The concert I enjoyed most of all was the Monteverdi Vespers, which was utterly mesmerising. Fortunately the BBC put out a very high quality radio transmission of that concert at 320 kbits/sec AAC (LE), and the result is virtually genuine CD quality.

  2. #107
    Senior Member Sid James's Avatar
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    On the weekend went to this concert by the Australia Ensemble, resident at University of New South Wales, Sydney. The Program was a good mix of two C20th Australian composers and two Europeans from earlier times:

    Saturday September 18, 8pm
    Sir John Clancy Auditorium

    Peggy GLANVILLE-HICKS (1912-1990): Concertino da camera for flute, clarinet, bassoon and piano (1945)
    Nigel BUTTERLEY (b 1935): Spindles of the Stars for flute, clarinet, violin, cello and piano (2005)
    Robert SCHUMANN (1810-1856): Piano Trio No 2 in F Opus 80 (1847) - 200th anniversary of the composer’s birth
    Wolfgang MOZART (1756-1791): Clarinet Quintet in A K581 (1789)

    A superb concert on all accounts. The Glanville-Hicks was a light, neo-classical work (she studied in Paris under Boulanger). The Butterley was reminiscent to me of Takemitsu, washes of colour (very subtle), & at one stage the piccolo, violin and cello played the same note, which sounded like it was coming from the same instrument. The composer was in the audience. The Schumann was poetic and lyrical - many emotions, highly influenced by J.S. Bach (the counterpoint). & to top it all off, the Goldner String Quartet with clarinetist Catherine McCorkill played the Mozart, which is my favourite clarinet quintet. The final movement was played quite fast, but they were so skilled, they could handle it easily. This was my first concert at this venue, and I plan to go back (acoustic excellent - the concert was recorded by ABC Classic FM radio for future broadcast)...
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  3. #108
    Senior Member Sid James's Avatar
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    Another one I went to at the Sydney Con last night:

    "A Little Charisma with Friends"
    Charisma Trio
    Julia Ryder - cello
    Ros Dunlop - clarinet/bass clarinet
    David Miller - piano
    Valmai Coggins - guest viola

    Alfred Hill - Miniature Trio No. 1 in F for clarinet, cello & piano (1916-18)
    Moya Henderson - G'Day Africa (I-III) for clarinet (doubling bass clarinet), cello, viola & piano (1995)
    Nino Rota - Trio for clarinet, cello & piano

    I had never heard any of these works. I came to see a Ravel & Tchaikovsky piano trio recital but it was postponed, this was on instead. The Hill was a neo-classical piece, written for his students at this very institution (the Sydney Con) where he taught. It was light & reminiscent of Mozart. The Henderson was the piece that grabbed me the most, based on South African songs & the clarinet part especially jazzy. The finale of the Rota was the most familiar piece, as it had a circus atmosphere, reminding me of a part of the soundtrack of La Strada (which he did for Fellini). I really enjoyed this recital, especially the Henderson (who was in the audience)...
    Genuine ersatz classical listener since 1981.

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  4. #109
    Senior Member Sid James's Avatar
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    Just went to two concerts here in Sydney this weekend (25-26 Sept '10):

    Metropolitan Chamber Orchestra
    Emma-Jane Murphy, cello
    Sarah Grace-Williams, conductor

    Ravel - Pavane for a Dead Princess
    Schumann - Cello Concerto
    Haydn - Symphony No. 103 "Drumroll"

    Sydney University Musical Society

    Gregory Platt - conductor
    Ross Cobb - organ
    Alice Girle, Jocelyn O'Brien - soprano (Vivaldi)
    Eliza Newton - alto (Vivaldi)
    Oskar Andersson - treble (Faure)
    Morgan Pearse - baritone (Faure)

    Faure - Requiem
    Vivaldi - Gloria

    A great weekend of music here in Sydney. I enjoyed all of the pieces, couldn't single one out. I wish all weekends could be as musically good as this! Also a weekend of firsts - the first ever cello concerto my accompanying friend & I saw, as well as the first requiem & Vivaldi piece. We chatted to cellist Emma-Jane Murphy after the MCO concert, and told her how much we appreciated her fine performance. Both the Schumann & Faure are pieces that didn't really grab me at first when hearing the recordings, but once I got to know them better, things just clicked into place. & seeing them live was the pinnacle for me. I'll be going to see these performers regularly, the MCO has a fantastic line up for next year, which is quite exciting...
    Genuine ersatz classical listener since 1981.

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  5. #110
    Senior Member World Violist's Avatar
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    I just got back from a piano recital by Gregory Partain. He played Beethoven's Waldstein, Ravel's Sonatine, and after interval Chopin's B-minor sonata. Then for an encore there was Schumann's F-sharp (?) Romance. (by the way, this was my first time hearing any of these pieces)

    I liked the Waldstein a lot. Crystal clear structure without being in your face, wonderful thematic concentration, and one intensely moving slow movement won me over to this, with very sensitive playing from the pianist. He didn't go for big effects, and I'm sure Beethoven didn't ask for any.

    Ravel's Sonatine is a fascinating piece, and I found some quirky similarities between it and the Waldstein. The structure and thematic material were both very clear (after all, it was Ravel), and Dr. Partain brought out every nuance.

    Sad to say I hated the first two movements of the Chopin, and the fault did not involve the pianist at all. I just don't think Chopin was cut out for large-scale forms. There were broad, arching melodies... and then there was another... and it segued neatly into... another... and the scherzo wasn't much better. The slow movement was very good because it played to the melody's advantage, but then it forgot to end about five times so I got bored with it. By the time the finale came, my brain was so dead from trying to connect strands that simply didn't exist that I could hardly care anymore.

    Schumann was great, and a much better ending to the program. Sensitive, dignified, intimate, and carrying a sense of finality about it. Quite moving.
    You get a frog in your throat, you sound hoarse.

  6. #111
    Senior Member Sid James's Avatar
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    Just went to a song recital yesterday at St. John's Uniting Church in Neutral Bay, Sydney, Australia:

    "An afternoon with Lauris Elms"

    This recital featured an interview with one of Australia's most well-loved opera singers, Lauris Elms, as well as performances by singers from Opera Australia of some of her favourite songs:

    Britten - A Charm of Lullabies (mezzo soprano Dominica Matthews)
    Schubert - The Shepherd on the Rock (soprano Fiona Maconaghie, with Deborah de Graff (clarinet))
    Mahler - Ruckert Lieder (baritone James Roser)
    All accompanied by John Martin at the piano

    This was a very enjoyable recital. They also played Schumann's Three Fantasy Pieces for clarinet and piano. Silvio Rivier's interview with retired opera/lieder singer Lauris Elms was particularly interesting, with her recounting memories of her career, including singing with Joan Sutherland at Covent Garden in Lucia di Lammermoor. It was interesting how she started off playing the piano, then the violin, and then began to work as a singer after a stint in the graphic arts industry. The clarinettist at the recital was her daughter. I liked all of the songs of the recital, the singers of the Australian Opera sang the Schubert, Mahler and Britten beautifully. This was my first song recital in 20 years, and my friend's first ever song recital, so it was quite exciting. We were also able to talk to some of the performers after the recital, as nibblies and drinks were served in the church hall. All in all a great evening & we plan to go to more of the recitals in this "Artsong" series...
    Genuine ersatz classical listener since 1981.

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  7. #112
    Senior Member World Violist's Avatar
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    I got back from a college choir concert just now. It was really good, and my first experience of hearing Arvo Part in concert (as opposed to playing).

    Svilainis: Vox populi, vox Dei
    Martini: Domine, ad adjuvandum me festina (I've played viola in this piece before)
    J.S. Bach: Sicut locutus est (from Magnificat in D)
    Mendelssohn: two choruses from Elijah ("Help, Lord" and "Lord, bow thine ear")
    Weelkes: Sing we at Pleasure
    Lauridsen: Dirait-on
    Standford: Quick! We have but a second

    -interval-

    Haydn: Awake the Harp (from the Creation)
    Stroope: I am not Yours
    Victoria: Super flumina Babylonis
    Part: Nunc dimittis
    Tomkins: When David Heard
    Whitacre: Kala kalla (Five Hebrew Love Songs)
    Huh: Sanctus (from Missa Arirang)
    Memley: O Magnum Mysterium

    The highlight for me was the Part. It was interesting since I was very taken with all the Renaissance music that was being sung, mostly for the stillness it created (except for the more jaunty ones, of course), and then the Part came in and everything got that much stiller.

    Wonderful concert.
    You get a frog in your throat, you sound hoarse.

  8. #113
    Senior Member Sid James's Avatar
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    Just went to this last night:

    Sydney Conservatorium of Music
    20th Century Masters Modern Music Ensemble

    Daryl Pratt, director
    Michael Haliwell, baritone (Schoenberg)
    Ole Bohn, violin and
    Daniel Herscovitch, piano (Berg)

    Schoenberg - Serenade Op. 24
    Berg - Kammerkonzert

    This was the first time I had seen the music live of either composer & it was great. It was interesting to see a mandolin and guitar as part of the ensemble for the Schoenberg. Despite this being one of the first ever serial pieces, the music was quite light and much of it based on dance forms. The bartione solo, with words from a sonnet by Petrarch, formed the pivot of the work. I had not heard the Schoenberg before, but I have been familiar with the Stern/Serkin/Abbado recording of the Berg since late last year. The whole of this work is based on the motto themes of the names of Schoenberg, Berg and Webern which are played by the piano, violin and horn at the beginning respectively. It is also a very symmetrical work - there are 15 players in all (divisible by three) and three movements. The first is mainly for the piano, the second for the violin and the third for them combined. There's even a bit of humour here - in the first movement, as the pianist is playing, the violinist "tunes up" (prefiguring the beginning of the later Violin Concerto). There was a lot going on in this performance, and I thought that the flautists (one doubling piccolo) also had a bit of a workout. The concert was preceded by a lecture on the Second Viennese School (and these works in particular) by Australian musicologist and broadcaster Andrew Ford. All in all, a great evening out...
    Genuine ersatz classical listener since 1981.

    Winner: TC Provider of Extraneous Information Award, 2012.

  9. #114
    Senior Member Nix's Avatar
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    These past two weeks I went to the BSO and saw Mahler 2 and 5.
    In 2 the orchestra started off a little weak, but when the choir came in and then the finale- I was half crying half laughing. Just completely floored me. 5, which, with recordings I generally prefer over 2 wasn't so moving live. BSO has amazing technique, but the musicians just looked so dead. Still, their brass section is absolutely amazing.

  10. #115
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    I dunno if it qualifies as purely classical, but last night at Oxford's Holywell I saw a soprano, mezzo, baritone and pianist perform Hugo Wolf's repertoire, naturally sung in German. A mixture of poetry, opera and classical pianism. I was lucky I got a seat! The thing sold out and the atmosphere was awesome. They're setting up a syndicate which needs 40 people to donate £100 to get a vinyl label up and running. The concert was recorded, and lasted around two hours - perfect length.

    As did Max Richter's show at Cadogan Hall in September. He's a pioneer of "post classical", so again not entirely traditional, with a string quintet and electronics peppering and overlaying the compositional understructuring. They performed "Infra" after an hour of pieces from his back catalogue. It was the first time I'd been at that venue, and hope to visit in the future.

  11. #116
    Senior Member World Violist's Avatar
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    I went to the Kentucky Music Teacher's Association Composers' Concert today! It was quite amazing; all the composers were still alive, all were present, and three of them were performing their pieces in some capacity. The last piece in the concert, Richard Crosby's viola sonata, was the definite highlight; it was the world premiere of the evening, having been the commission of the year. I met the composer next year and it looks like I'm going to be learning it! I'm really excited about it; it's a fantastic piece.

    Here's the program:

    Charles W. Smith: Flute Sonata (1998)
    Tim Polashek: Piano Sonata (2005)
    Thomas Couvillon: Blues Trio (2008)
    Larry Barnes: two movements from Rain Songs (1992)
    Richard Burchard: O Magnum Mysterium (2000/2006), Creator Alme Siderum (1998/2000)

    interval

    Marc Satterwhite: three selections from Van Gogh's Flowers (2008)
    Richard Crosby: Viola Sonata (2010)


    The flute sonata that began the program was very impressive to me; the flute had an expressive singing line and the piano part was very sparse, but it was still a work of remarkable substance. Upon looking in the program notes it makes sense; Charles Smith is an accomplished flautist and it shows in the confident writing. It was a great piece.

    The Polashek piano sonata was the low point of the whole concert, and it was not because of the composition; the pianist was just reading the notes, not phrasing anything, not varying any dynamics, etc. I told myself during the performance that I didn't like it, but I kept thinking of things that could have been better and soon realized that it was the pianist who was disservicing the music, so I can't really make a fair judgment of it as a piece.

    Couvillon's Blues Trio was alright... I didn't find anything truly remarkable about it either good or bad.

    The Rain Songs were interesting. Despite its title, it was for flute and piano (composer at the piano). The first selection didn't actually have any piano at all, the pianist utilizing a rain stick and vocalizing. The second selection brought the piano in, and there were strong reminiscences of Ravel. It was still very good, though. I can't remember it so well.

    The two pieces by Richard Burchard were nice; typical modern choral music.

    Satterwhite's songs from Van Gogh's Flowers (three of five were sung) were quite good. Much of the English texts were almost declamatory in delivery, and the added horn part was very coloristically used, with several instances of stopped notes and multiphonics. The second selection was my favorite, with a slow tempo and eschewing big dramatic effects, plainly setting the text. It was truly beautiful.

    Richard Crosby's viola sonata had a solidity that few of the other compositions had, written in a fairly normal sonata form overall in largely normal Romantic-esque tonality. However, there were many fascinating changes in character and mode within the structure that were attractive to me. The viola part was fairly uncomplicated (my former viola teacher actually helped the composer in writing the viola part), as was the piano part (Crosby is a professionally-trained pianist and performed as such in this performance). The sonata is officially being released for sale tomorrow, so I'm looking forward to that. I feel like it's a valuable piece for the viola repertoire.

    So overall this was a very good concert.
    You get a frog in your throat, you sound hoarse.

  12. #117
    Senior Member Sid James's Avatar
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    I enjoyed your review, WV...

    Went to this chamber concert on the weekend, at the University of New South Wales in Sydney. The performers were members of the Australia Ensemble.

    Ligeti - Six Bagatelles for wind quintet (1953)
    W.A. Mozart - Eine kleine Nachtmusik in G K525 for two violins, viola, cello and double bass (1787)
    Matthew Hindson (b. 1968) - Light is both a particle and a wave for flute, clarinet, piano, two violins, viola and cello, commissioned by Justice Jane Matthews (2010) - first performance
    Saint-Saens - The Carnival of the Animals (Le carnaval des animaux) for two pianos, two violins, viola, cello, double bass, flute, clarinet and glockenspiel/xylophone (1886)

    This was a fun night. The older pieces were light and fun, while the Hindson was more serious. The first movement of the Hindson reminded me of Xenakis (structured dissonance?) and the second movement of the old romantic classical music. There was a pivotal piano solo where the pianist played all over the keyboard - very impressive to see/hear. I was a bit thrown off by how, after the dissonance and almost aggressive energy of the first movement, there was a complete change of style to something more romantic and melodic. It was a big contrast. The Saint-Saens was the most fun piece of the evening, and a great finisher (for the whole Australia Ensemble 2010 season). I especially liked how cellist Julian Smiles was able to play the famous Swan in an emotional way without lapsing into sentimentality. I look forward to going to more of their concerts next year...
    Genuine ersatz classical listener since 1981.

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  13. #118
    Senior Member Sid James's Avatar
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    Went to see this last night @ Sydney Conservatorium of Music:

    Cocktail Hour Recital Series
    "Not unravelling and not petering out"
    Ole Bohn, violin
    Georg Pedersen, cello
    Phillip Shovk, piano

    Ravel - Trio in A minor
    Tchaikovsky - Trio in A minor, Op. 50 (Dedicated to a great artist, Nicolai Rubinstein)

    This was a recital by three of the teaching staff of the Con, who are excellent musicians. The Ravel piano trio is one of my favourite works by him. It's light and airy, the first movement being based on a Basque tune, the second on the rhythms of Malaysian poetry, the third a passacaglia (neo-classical?), and the finale contains reminiscences of what went on before. I just love the last movement - it makes me think of being on the beach in summer, hearing the surf, the hot sun, a whisp of breeze. Apparently Ravel despised Beethoven (cellist Georg Pedersen related how Ravel said to cellist Gregor Piatagorsky, Pedersen's teacher, after a recital of Beethoven words to the affect that "Your performance was excellent, but why did you choose to play such terrible music?"). Funnily enough, I hear similarities in how both composers utilised the piano trio, but those similarities may well be superficial. The second half of the program was taken up by Tchaikovsky's piano trio which I had never heard before. The first movement was quite song like but also agitated, the second a theme and variations which (at times) had a Baroque/Classical era flavour - a bit like the Rococo Variations - and the third quite elegaic and dark.

    For those in Sydney, these Cocktail Hour recitals are on at the Con every Monday, put on by staff of the Con, and the cost is $15 adult/$10 concessions. The two small 100 seater recital halls are used, so the atmosphere is intimate and you get a good view (staggered seating). They are put on during semester times only. Recommended!...
    Genuine ersatz classical listener since 1981.

    Winner: TC Provider of Extraneous Information Award, 2012.

  14. #119
    Senior Member Sid James's Avatar
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    Last night, I went to these two at Sydney's Conservatorium of Music:

    "Mature Delights"
    Sydney Conservatorium Symphony Orchestra
    Imre Palló and Doctor of Musical Arts student Anthony Clarke, conductors

    Sculthorpe String Sonata No 5 for string orchestra*
    Bartok Concerto for orchestra
    * World Première 101 Compositions for 100 Years

    "Zodiac"
    Ensemble Offspring

    Program:
    * world premiere

    •Mitchell Huckstepp: new work, for flute, clarinet & two percussion *
    •Daniel Manera: Duet for Clarinet and Hi-Hat *
    •Laura Altman: new work, for flute, clarinet & two percussion *
    •Helena Czajka: Trafalgar Square, for flute, clarinet, marimba and vibraphone *
    •Stephen Rozanc: new work, for flute, clarinet & two percussion *
    •Natalie Unwalla: The Mouse, the Bird and the Sausage, for flute, clarinet and marimba *
    •Marcus Whale: Slatted Light, for two winds, accordion and vibraphone*

    - interval -

    •Karlheinz Stockhausen: Tierkreis (arr. Ensemble Offspring), for flutes, clarinets & 2 percussion

    I enjoyed both concerts. In the first, Peter Sculthorpe talked about his concern with how climate change is effecting Australia, and how this was the main issue behind his String Quartet No. 18 (here in a new arrangement for string orchestra). He said that he had thought about ending the work in a dark way, but said that he's an optimist and couldn't bear to do that, no matter how (sometimes) grim the outlook in this matter. The movements were titled Prelude - A Land Singing - A Dying Land - A Lost Land - Postlude. There were the usual trademark Sculthorpe sounds - insect sounds, bird song, and the drone of the didgeridoo simulated by the strings. The middle movements sounded similar to his Sun Musics a bit. Initially, when hearing the optimistic ending of the work in the original version on radio (the birds return after the desolation of the middle movements), I thought it was a bit cheesy. But talking to a woman during the interval, she said that we need a bit of optimism in this day and age & I think that's true. I really liked the sound of the five double basses - awsome!

    After the interval we were treated to another "mature delight," Bartok's exhuberant, tragic and humorous Concerto for Orchestra. The orchestra played their hearts out. This is a great group who just got back from acclaimed performances in New York and San Francisco (maybe some members here saw them?). I think that they must have done us proud, judging from the standard of their playing here.

    The Ensemble Offspring concert was no less enjoyable. We were treated to seven new works by final year students at the Con. There were a variety of approaches, eg. the Manera sounded jazzy and a bit rocky, the Altman a bit like the static but ever changing soundscapes of Takemitsu, & the Huckstepp a bit minimalistic. To top it all off, after the interval the four musicians played their own arrangment of Stockhausen's Tierkreis (Signs of the Zodiac) and doubled and even tripled on all manner of wind and percussion instruements - a plethora of flutes and clarinets, accordion, mouth organ, piano, cowbells, marimba, xylophone, and even a music box. It was perhaps the most colourful piece I have ever heard. I plan to go to some of their concerts next year, I talked to their director and Harry Partch's music is on the cards (they are currently building the instruments to play that). Can't wait!...
    Genuine ersatz classical listener since 1981.

    Winner: TC Provider of Extraneous Information Award, 2012.

  15. #120
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    Last Saturday I was in concert hall Vatroslav Lisinski here in Zagreb.
    And I had one the best concerts in last few seasons

    Sao Paolo symphony orchestra conducted by Yan Pascal Tortelier and soloist Antonio Meneses, violoncelloWonderful orchestra, fabulous conductor and soloist.My mouth is full of praise!


    The program was following:

    Antonio Carlos Gomes: Lo Schiavo: Alvorada
    Alvorada means Waking and it describes waking of the Brazilian forest.I've never heard anything made by this composer but in the program book it says he was very popular in Europe, in 19th century, and that some people even said he was as good as Verdi.
    About the composition.It is intermezzo from opera "Slave" and it made really good impression on me.Great role had the , brass section.
    The song started slowly and quietly but had a constant crescendo and it finished in I dare to say epic way.

    Edward Elgar: Concerto for violoncello and orchestra in E minor op. 85
    I'll just say: wonderful!Everything was perfect, the composition, soloist and of course Elgar.I especially liked 3rd movement Adagio.

    Claude Debussy: Prelude to the Afternoon of a Faun
    1st time I heard Debussy played by orchestra and again it was wonderful

    Witold Lutoslawski: Concerto for orchestra
    I was very skeptical about this concerto.But (again) I was very pleased.My first thought was: interesting.After a minute I thought: this is fantastic
    I was a bit annoyed by the timpani in the 1st movement but in whole I liked this concert very much.


    The fact that all of this pieces were new to me might be explained with my age
    I'm 15 (and a pianist) and in the past 2 years I've been on a lot of concerts and slowly I'm developing my own musical taste.This was one of my favourite concerts in the past 2 seasons, mainly because of the orchestra and the conductor who was great.I'm sure that if some other orchestra played this program I wouldn't like it so much.But I would like Antonio Meneses.


    I'm looking forward to concerts tomorrow and the day after tomorrow.Evgeny Kissin and Milano Scala orchestra.I'll write a review when I get time.
    I hope you'll like my review

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