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Thread: Passionate people; to you, what are the most emotionally impacting 20th C works?

  1. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dasein View Post
    I'm willing to bet everyone here has at least one piece that absolutely destroys them on a visceral level. Of course when it comes down to purely emotional things they can be fickle, even down to daily or hourly moods, but if it touches your soul on any sort of regular basis I want to hear about it.
    Viscerally speaking, for me, the Shostakovich Symphony #5 stands out. The finale never fails to give me chills.

    Quote Originally Posted by Dasein View Post
    This is for the raw, unthinking, animalistic appreciation; hooting, weeping, spastically flailing in your arm chair or even melting into a puddle at the base of it is the name of the game. This is King Lear on the brink and Ophelia in the river. No appreciation for revolutionary ideas or experimentation; the mind has no place here.

    If you feel that this sort of description or classification is lacking, or naively youthful, or you want shake fists at each other I'm all ears (and fists); also any thoughts you might have are welcome, positive or negative, or purely philosophical.
    I'll never turn down an offer to share philosophical thoughts! Your classification is not lacking or naïve at all - the ability to appreciate music from the heart and at an emotional level is an essential part of the spirit of the art (and the responses to your thread have provided me with a lot of intriguing-sounding new pieces to add to my listening list). But I would just challenge the idea that 'the mind has no place here' - I think the mind and heart can cooperate in this endeavor and in fact are always doing so. In my own encounters with music, listening to music with the participation of the mind - done with care and in moderation - more often enhances the emotional and visceral experience than detracts from it; that's certainly the case for me in the Shostakovich. But I think that even when we're not aware of it, the mind it interpreting music at a subconscious level - just as we're able to understand the meaning of language without being conscious of the rules of the vocabulary and grammar that give it that meaning.
    Last edited by Thomyum2; Aug-18-2018 at 17:40.

  2. #17
    Senior Member leonsm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MusicSybarite View Post
    This definitely has to be here: Schnittke's Cello concerto No. 1

    Also:

    Penderecki - Threnody for the victims of Hiroshima (visceral)
    Kalnins - Symphony No. 5 (incredibly touching)
    Respighi - Suite from 'Belkis, Regina di Saba', Vetrate di Chiesa (both works are wonderful in every sense of the word)
    Prokofiev - Cantata for the 20th anniversary of the October Revolution
    Schmidt - Symphony No. 2, Intermezzo from 'Notre Dame' (both works are disproportionately romantic and passionate)

    I totally concur with you in the 'Cello Concerto no. 1' by Schnittke. The whole work is amazing, but the final movement is something from another level, it's a painfully beautiful piece of music.

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  4. #18
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    For sheer power, Bartok's Miraculous Mandarin
    For wistfulness, Das Lied von der Erde
    For a feeling of immense pride at being a human being, Tippett's The Midsummer Marriage

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