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Thread: Passionate people; to you, what are the most emotionally impacting 20th C works?

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    Junior Member Dasein's Avatar
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    Default Passionate people; to you, what are the most emotionally impacting 20th C works?

    Hoping that the pedantic, scholarly, classifying, collecting, and other such elements that can creep into music hobbyism are laid aside here. This is for the raw, unthinking, animalistic appreciation; hooting, weeping, spastically flailing in your arm chair or even melting into a puddle at the base of it is the name of the game. This is King Lear on the brink and Ophelia in the river. No appreciation for revolutionary ideas or experimentation; the mind has no place here.

    The main reason I put 20th century is because I haven't listened to a sizable amount of it and am curious; but it's not 100% strict, so if there's something that's really, really been grabbing you recently feel free to post it.

    I'm willing to bet everyone here has at least one piece that absolutely destroys them on a visceral level. Of course when it comes down to purely emotional things they can be fickle, even down to daily or hourly moods, but if it touches your soul on any sort of regular basis I want to hear about it.

    If you feel that this sort of description or classification is lacking, or naively youthful, or you want shake fists at each other I'm all ears (and fists); also any thoughts you might have are welcome, positive or negative, or purely philosophical.

    Thanks for reading.
    Last edited by Dasein; Jun-11-2018 at 20:29.

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    Senior Member Merl's Avatar
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    Arvo Part's 'Fratres for Strings and Percussion'. So beautiful.

    Last edited by Merl; Jun-11-2018 at 20:26.

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    Senior Member Art Rock's Avatar
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    Gorecki's third for me. Heartbreaking, yet I can't stop listening.

    And Mahler of course (Kindertotenlieder, Das Lied von der Erde, Symphony 9).
    #I♥CD

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    Senior Member MusicSybarite's Avatar
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    This definitely has to be here: Schnittke's Cello concerto No. 1

    Also:

    Penderecki - Threnody for the victims of Hiroshima (visceral)
    Kalnins - Symphony No. 5 (incredibly touching)
    Respighi - Suite from 'Belkis, Regina di Saba', Vetrate di Chiesa (both works are wonderful in every sense of the word)
    Prokofiev - Cantata for the 20th anniversary of the October Revolution
    Schmidt - Symphony No. 2, Intermezzo from 'Notre Dame' (both works are disproportionately romantic and passionate)

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    Senior Member MusicSybarite's Avatar
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    Four more pieces:

    Schoenberg - Gurrelieder
    Holmboe - Symphony No. 8 'Boreale'
    Casella - Symphony No. 2
    Brian - Symphony No. 1 'Gothic'
    Last edited by MusicSybarite; Jun-11-2018 at 20:56.

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    Senior Member Strange Magic's Avatar
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    Two early Hovhaness works: Piano Concerto No. 1, Lousadzak, with Maro Ajemian at the keyboard, please!; Violin Concerto No. 2, with Anahid Ajemian, violin.

    Plus so many more.....

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    Senior Member Pat Fairlea's Avatar
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    Barber's Violin Concerto. No contest.

    Part's Cantus In Memoriam Benjamin Britten a good runner-up.

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    Senior Member Robert Pickett's Avatar
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    I'm not sure why 20th century works should in any way be less likely to destroy on a visceral level than music of any other century....

    For starters there are too many pieces by Bartok and Janacek to even mention! But for starters, Cantata profana by the former, The Cunning Little Vixen by the latter.

    Oh, and Martinu's Opening of the Wells, Stravinsky's Apollo and Kodaly's Psalmus Hungaricus get me going every time.....
    Last edited by Robert Pickett; Jun-12-2018 at 14:33.

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    Senior Member Marsilius's Avatar
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    Maybe I'm being superficial, but for me Rachmaninoff is right up there with the piano concerto no. 2 (1901) and the second symphony (1907).

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dasein View Post

    I'm willing to bet everyone here has at least one piece that absolutely destroys them on a visceral level.
    Pieces that take me outside of myself are Beethoven's C# minor string quartet, the A minor quartet, and Piano Sonata 111. In pieces like this, I've heard them, studied them, marked up the score, and now they're, I guess you could say, assimilated. One piece that gets me humbled, then out of my chair and stomping around, then staring upward in transcendence is Beethoven's Missa Solemnis.
    Last edited by Manxfeeder; Jun-12-2018 at 17:26.

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    [QUOTE=Dasein;1461270]Hoping that the pedantic, scholarly, classifying, collecting, and other such elements that can creep into music hobbyism are laid aside here.[QUOTE]

    I've never heard of hobbyism and do not think "music hobbyism" adequately describes TalkClassical. People engage with varying amounts of experience and kinds of interests. As I understand it this site is intended to be open and welcoming to everyone. I disagree with your polarization: in music reason and passion can work together, and I believe their integration is valuable when talking about classical music.

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  21. #12
    Junior Member Dasein's Avatar
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    I've never heard of hobbyism and do not think "music hobbyism" adequately describes TalkClassical. People engage with varying amounts of experience and kinds of interests. As I understand it this site is intended to be open and welcoming to everyone. I disagree with your polarization: in music reason and passion can work together, and I believe their integration is valuable when talking about classical music.
    If I thought that music hobbyism was the entirety of TalkClassical I would have just said TalkClassical instead of music hobbyism. This is a post in a forum, in other words it's a subcontext to a context; it's entire purpose is to distinguish between what it wants to be and what it doesn't want to be using text; it's necessarily exclusive. TalkClassical includes the totality of what can bring together interest in music; this thread is about one single element, PURPOSELY. Obviously reason and passion can work together; that's why I had to be so specific in separating them. Almost every single thread in here is about an integrated take, homogeneity can be so tiresome; and who's to say their dis-integration isn't also valuable?
    Last edited by Dasein; Jun-13-2018 at 00:20.

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    Senior Member Joe B's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dasein View Post
    The main reason I put 20th century is because I haven't listened to a sizable amount of it and am curious; but it's not 100% strict, so if there's something that's really, really been grabbing you recently feel free to post it.

    I'm willing to bet everyone here has at least one piece that absolutely destroys them on a visceral level.
    You're not kidding. There are several 21st Century choral works that get a visceral reaction from me each time I play them. Currently at the top of my list is Will Todd's "Ode to a Nightingale". I also find Todd's "The Call of Wisdom" (referring to the entire disc) performed by Tenebrae and the English Chamber Orchestra puts me into a much needed mental and emotional space.

    20th Century: Howard Hanson's "Symphony #3". I'm also really beginning to develop a need for more works by 20th Century British composers.
    I love music. I want music. I need music.

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