Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: Carlos Seixas (1704 - 1742)

  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Brazil
    Posts
    566
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Carlos Seixas (1704 - 1742)

    Carlos Seixas was born in Coimbra in 1704 and died at the young age of 38 in Lisbon. Son of the organist of the Sé (cathedral) of Coimbra, he was a child prodigy and obtained the title of organist in the same church his father presided with 14 years. Two years later he decided to move to Lisbon, where he met and probably had lessons with Domenico Scarlatti, whose influence is so clearly seen in in his works. There is even an anedocte saying that when the king's son, Dom António, arranged for Scarlatti to give him harpsichord lessons, Scarlatti replied that it was Seixas who should give him lessons, saying that Seixas was one of the finest virtuosi he had ever seen. He would soon become assistant organist to Scarlatti and after his departure to Spain (he was the teacher of the Royal Princess Maria Barbara who married the Infante of Spain and then move to the Escorial) he assumed the job of organist in Lisbon and court composer, where he died in 1742.

    Seixas is arguably the most important keyboard composer from the Iberian Peninsula until the generation of Albéniz and Granados. He shows a double influence, first from the Iberian harpsichord and organ tradicion and even more important from the Italian style, specially from Scarlattis inventions. It is hard to know when each composer wrote each sonata, but Seixas sonatas usually show a rather advanced understanding of the sonata style, having composed even quasi-sonata forms in some works: bitematic and with a tonal I-V-I outlook, the texture and the phrasing also are located in the galante style. Also his harmonic writing is rather different showing an impressive ease with the sixth repertoire of the period. It is open to discussion who influenced whom but most probably we should think on a reciprocal development.

    We are not only unfortuned due to his young death, but also about 90% of everything he composed was kept in the Cathedral of Lisbon, which would be razed and burnt thirteen years later in the famous earthquake of 1755. We know of 700 sonatas on his name, and we have about 100, we know of 10 masses, and have one, several symphonies are lost, and from his orchestral output we saved only an Overture which shows an unexplained French influence.

    If someone is keen on him please manifest.
    Last edited by Taggart; Jan-02-2021 at 13:15. Reason: Date checking

  2. Likes Ingélou liked this post
  3. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Brazil
    Posts
    566
    Post Thanks / Like

  4. Likes Ingélou liked this post
  5. #3
    Senior Member clavichorder's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    WA, U.S.
    Posts
    5,088
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    3

    Default

    Ah yes. I know someone who has Seixas keyboard works on youtube, played on a very unique clavicitherium. Check these out: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q8fzD...el_video_title
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zz0fL...feature=relmfu
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vv8lZ...feature=relmfu

  6. Likes Taggart, Ingélou liked this post
  7. #4
    Senior Member Ingélou's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Gemtown in Yorkshire
    Posts
    5,463
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    36

    Default

    What a double misfortune - his short life, and the earthquake fire that destroyed most of his work.

    I've enjoyed listening to the (short) pieces on the posted links. Thank you.

    On YouTube now, there are these longer videos:

    Harpsichord Sonatas 1:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sTncXiDlpl4

    & Harpsichord Sonatas 2:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V_ge__9F4oE

    What a wonderful thing internet education is.
    Last edited by Ingélou; Jan-02-2021 at 12:42.
    ~ Mollie ~
    My fiddle my joy.

  8. Likes Taggart liked this post
  9. #5
    Sr. Moderator Taggart's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Yorkshire (ex-Glasgow)
    Posts
    4,269
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    His actual dates are 1704 to 1742 see wiki. Equally, the earthquake which destroyed most of his work was in 1755.

    I've edited the OP to reflect this.
    Music begins where words leave off. Music expresses the inexpressible.

  10. Likes Ingélou liked this post
  11. #6
    New Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2021
    Posts
    1
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    The style Carlos has, it sounds like what would have been if there were no gallant but except a baroque to classical transitional period.

    I've been exploring his works, some of which are quite good:
    Very good, the album is decent too: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1BxHJ2SUntc
    This as well, though the rendition isn't doing it justice, this has a lot of potential: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9f4fJIa4Ni8
    Another: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zz1c8oCFG7I
    Another banger, super good: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e0WXu_EBgU0
    Ill likely post more good ones when I find them.

    A lot of his music is quite fun to listen to, reminds me of Alessandro Scarlatti a bit.
    Last edited by Subkontraposaunenbass; Jan-11-2021 at 02:29.

  12. Likes Taggart liked this post

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •