View Poll Results: Deep Tracks - Choose your favourites - up to five selections allowed...

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7. You may not vote on this poll
  • "Suite: Judy Blue Eyes"

    7 100.00%
  • "Marrakesh Express"

    2 28.57%
  • "Guinnevere"

    3 42.86%
  • "You Don't Have to Cry"

    2 28.57%
  • "Pre-Road Downs"

    1 14.29%
  • "Wooden Ships"

    4 57.14%
  • "Lady of the Island"

    0 0%
  • "Helplessly Hoping"

    3 42.86%
  • "Long Time Gone"

    1 14.29%
  • "49 Bye-Byes"

    2 28.57%
Multiple Choice Poll.
Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: Deep Tracks - CSN - "Crosby, Stills & Nash" - Choose your favourites -

  1. #1
    Senior Member Sydney Nova Scotia's Avatar
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    Default Deep Tracks - CSN - "Crosby, Stills & Nash" - Choose your favourites -

    Attachment 105549

    This is one of a series of polls in which you will be asked nothing more than to choose your favourite tunes from the album in question.

    The number of selections that you will be allowed to choose will vary from album to album but a higher number than that found in usual polls of this nature will be allowed so that album tracks (which form the foundation of "classic albums") will not be overshadowed by hit singles.

    Please choose up to five selections for this particular poll.

    The tunes themselves (when available) will be found below the poll itself as links rather than as embedded videos due to bandwidth issues for those who wish to reacquaint themselves with a tune that may have receded a bit too far into the past to be remembered with the clarity that came when they were first released...

    Next up is "Crosby, Stills & Nash" -

    "The album was a very strong debut for the band, instantly lifting them to stardom. Along with the Byrds' "Sweetheart of the Rodeo" and The Band's "Music from Big Pink" of the previous year, it helped initiate a sea change in popular music away from the ruling late sixties aesthetic of bands playing blues-based rock music on loud guitars."

    "Crosby, Stills & Nash presented a new wrinkle in building upon rock's roots, utilizing folk, blues, and even jazz without specifically sounding like mere duplication. Not only blending voices, the three meshed their differing strengths, David Crosby for social commentary and atmospheric mood pieces, Stephen Stills for his diverse musical skills and for folding folk and country elements subtly into complex rock structures, and Graham Nash for his radio-friendly pop melodies, to create an amalgam of broad appeal."

    "This album proved very influential on many levels to the dominant popular music scene in America for much of the 1970s. The success of the album generated gravitas for the group within the industry, and galvanized interest in signing like acts, many of whom came under management and representation by the CSN team of Elliot Roberts and David Geffen."

    "Strong sales, combined with the group's emphasis on personal confession in its writing, paved the way for the success of the singer-songwriter movement of the early seventies. Their utilization of personal events in their material without resorting to subterfuge, their talents in vocal harmony, their cultivation of painstaking studio craft, as well as the Laurel Canyon ethos that surrounded the group and their associates, established an aesthetic for a number of acts that came to define the "California" sound of the ensuing decade, including the Eagles, Jackson Browne, post-1974 Fleetwood Mac, and others."

    " In 2003, Rolling Stone ranked Crosby, Stills & Nash number 262 on their list of the 500 greatest albums of all time."

    Your commentary on any and every aspect of the album and especially any memories reawakened as a result of the poll is welcomed.

  2. #2
    Senior Member Sydney Nova Scotia's Avatar
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    Last edited by Sydney Nova Scotia; Jul-11-2018 at 13:35.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Strange Magic's Avatar
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    While CS&N is a fine album, we were lucky that there was so much more to come from an absolutely wonderful trio/quartet. For intensity and overall musicality I prefer the Airplane's version of Wooden Ships--one of my Ten Best Ever songs.

  4. #4
    Senior Member elgars ghost's Avatar
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    I like the album by and large but I far prefer the Stills and Crosby tracks to the ones written by Nash, who was usually too twee for my liking. Stills especially was approaching his A-game here, but as a songwriter I think he absolutely peaked with his solo debut and the Manassas albums.
    '...a violator of his word, a libertine over head and ears in debt and disgrace, a despiser of domestic ties, the companion of gamblers and demireps, a man who has just closed half a century without a single claim on the gratitude of his country or the respect of posterity...' - Leigh Hunt on the Prince Regent (later George IV).

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  6. #5
    Senior Member Sydney Nova Scotia's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Strange Magic View Post
    While CS&N is a fine album, we were lucky that there was so much more to come from an absolutely wonderful trio/quartet. For intensity and overall musicality I prefer the Airplane's version of Wooden Ships--one of my Ten Best Ever songs.
    Further background on this particular tune for anyone who's interested -

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wooden_Ships

  7. #6
    Senior Member Strange Magic's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sydney Nova Scotia View Post
    Further background on this particular tune for anyone who's interested -

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wooden_Ships
    At just about the same time--maybe a little earlier--Marty Balin had penned The House at Pooneil Corners for the Airplane; such was the Zeitgeist. Another chiller song of utter nuclear devastation; still hard to listen to and retain a disinterested mind.

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  9. #7
    Senior Member Sydney Nova Scotia's Avatar
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    One of the most frightening yet fascinating films that I've ever seen - haunts me to this very day -

    Last edited by Sydney Nova Scotia; Jul-12-2018 at 16:34.

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  11. #8
    Senior Member ldiat's Avatar
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    5) 4 dead in O-Ohio KSU in 1970

  12. #9
    Senior Member Strange Magic's Avatar
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    The Omega Man was a good film, one of a trio of excellent sci-fi flicks starring Charleton Heston; the other two being the superlative Planet of the Apes and also Soylent Green. I remember Anthony Zerbe accusing Heston in the film of having dabbled in chemistry and magnetism, among other sins. The Omega Man was originally Richard Matheson's novel I Am Legend; Matheson also gave us The Incredible Shrinking Man, as well as some classic horror short tales like the sinister The Distributor. A 1950s phenomenon (along with another master of the macabre, Charles Beaumont).

    But I digress.....

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