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Thread: Élisabeth Jacquet de La Guerre, 1665 – 1729.

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    Senior Member Ingélou's Avatar
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    Default Élisabeth Jacquet de La Guerre, 1665 – 1729.



    Élisabeth Jacquet was born into a Parisian family of musicians on 17th March 1665. As a child prodigy, she played the harpsichord before Louis XIV and was accepted at court and educated there. In 1684, she married the organist Marin de la Guerre.

    After her marriage, she taught, composed, and gave concerts in Paris and was highly esteemed. She composed in a variety of styles, including ballet and opera, and was a skilled improviser. Hers was one of the few collections of harpsichord pieces published in 17th century France. She experimented with Italian forms such as the sonata and cantata.

    Music consoled her for the loss of her only son, her husband, parents and brother. She continued to compose and publish, and died at Paris on 27th June 1729.

    According to Wiki - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C3%89...t_de_La_Guerre - there was a revival of interest in her music in the 1990s, which resulted in a number of recordings.

    I would like to thank another member of Talk Classical, Heather Reichgott, for telling me about this talented composer of beautiful baroque music.

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    I follow with some links currently on YouTube.
    I welcome more posts with additional links, information and opinions.
    Many thanks in advance.
    Last edited by Ingélou; Jul-14-2018 at 15:02.
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    Senior Member Ingélou's Avatar
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    From YouTube - harpsichord suites 1 - 6.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V-C-iR2eUeQ
    and
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F5kQeQd5CxU

    Elisabeth Claude Jacquet de La Guerre Sonata 1:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MzLu0ciYIOU
    Last edited by Ingélou; Jul-14-2018 at 14:59.
    My fiddle my joy.

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    Senior Member Ingélou's Avatar
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    Élisabeth Jacquet de La Guerre - "Cephale et Procris", (1694) - an opera, on YouTube:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2vpUYov0o54

    Elisabeth Jacquet de La Guerre: 'Le Sommeil d'Ulisse', Cantata
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MdKx7o2zRg0
    My fiddle my joy.

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    I have not explored her violin music, or indeed her music for voice. I have, on the other hand, spent some time listening to her keyboard music over the past year, and IMO she is a master of style brisé for keyboard. The idea of petit-maître does not do justice to the contrapuntal ingenuity of her harpsichord suites.

    As far as recordings go, there are three that I like. Above all, Blandine Verlet for it's freshness And a notch below Elizabeth Farr for the way she manages the voices; Karen Flint for her frank eloquence.

    This comment of Elizabeth Farr seems to me to be right on the money

    There are as many varieties and shades of difference in Jacquet de La Guerre’s harpsichord suites as there are movements. She clearly knows the inherent character of the different stylized dance forms in each suite, yet each example speaks with an individual expression that makes her music captivating. Well structured rhythmically and harmonically, her music never sounds staid or predictable. Composing in the brisé style allowed her to put individual notes precisely where she wanted them, suggesting a freedom in how harmonies are sounded and melodies unfold. Her use of dissonance and the placement of ornaments is often surprising, in the most pleasing way, and lends undeniable atmosphere and flair.

    Because of these qualities, this music asks to be played in a way that is sensitive to and communicative of Affect, while sounding relaxed and unpremeditated. Each performance, as well as hearing, of each movement should be as fresh as if it were the first and as satisfying as if it were the last.
    Last edited by Mandryka; Jul-14-2018 at 15:14.

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