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Thread: Best westerns

  1. #121
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mifek View Post
    Lemonade Joe - it seems that nobody mentioned yet that cult classic western from 1964.



    Available at youtube with English subtitles:
    https://youtu.be/SzuTQWrjh2o
    Never heard of it!! Thanks for the heads up.

  2. #122
    Junior Member ThaNotoriousNIC's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Christabel View Post
    I agree with your list, except for numbers 5 and 6. Those Anthony Mann westerns were something else; he saw a darkness within James Stewart and was able to exploit that to bring to the screen some excellent depictions of what violence does to the individual. "True Grit" (1969) was a lot of fun, but I loved "Shane" (director George Stevens a hero of mine). That little boy calling out after Shane right at the end. Very touching. The Cavalry Trilogy: this one is my favourite, "Rio Grande". Wayne acknowledged composer Victor Young when he received his Oscar for "True Grit". (This music is just so reminiscent of Herbert Stothart!!)

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AHAmpmMBXl4

    I read one of the most excellently written and researched biographies ever; John Ford by Joseph McBride. He claims John Ford insisted Archie Stout be included as a 2nd Unit cinematographer on "Rio Grande", despite the fact he'd gone past it professionally. Ford was loyal to his buddies and, as Stout had lost a son (his only child) six years earlier in WW2, the director absolutely insisted he got a job working on this picture. A lot in that cast were personal friends of both John Ford and John Wayne.

    Another little-known fact is the incredible history of Co-Producer Merian C. Cooper: what a man!

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Merian_C._Cooper
    I definitely agree in regards to the Jimmy Stewart westerns directed by Anthony Mann. Don't get as much love as the John Wayne classics or the spaghetti westerns, but I find them to be very entertaining. I am not too familiar with all of the aspect of John Ford's life with the exception of his career during WWII (thanks to that documentary that came out a few years ago). I do not know much about Cooper either besides his involvement with King Kong. Might have to do some reading!

  3. #123
    Senior Member SanAntone's Avatar
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    Just watched Hondo - pretty great.

  4. #124
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    Quote Originally Posted by SanAntone View Post
    Just watched Hondo - pretty great.
    Well, I liked that film too. But I preferred the later "The Comancheros". I have a story to relate: many decades ago our family went on a beach holiday. I was very young and that film was playing at the place of our holiday. The family wanted to spend the day further up the coast, about an hour's drive away, but I refused to go saying I wanted to remain behind to see "The Comancheros" at the cinema. I sat through 2 sessions!! And I was still in primary school. In your wildest imagination can you see any parent leaving a youngster like that alone to go to the movies today!!?? But I was a crank about films even then!! And there I first learned about Michael Curtiz. Seriously; I cleared rooms even back them yammering on about film.

    It was also beginning of a love affair with composer Elmer Bernstein:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BfBPQcMZjzA
    Last edited by Christabel; Jul-16-2020 at 04:40.

  5. #125
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    I haven't watched tons of Westerns but recently went through a pretty intense phase - I have to say I think Once Upon a Time in the West is miles and miles better than The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly - the former has a genuinely mythic/epic feeling to it, and is just visually gorgeous, while the latter just seems to drag on forever with not much interesting to hold on to, and Clint Eastwood specifically just struck me as kind of bumbling and foolish rather than the kickass antihero he's made out to be (which might have been the point?).

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