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Thread: Bach: Das wohltemperierte Klavier (The Well-Tempered Clavier), BWV 846-893

  1. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by joen_cph View Post
    Science knows these things, I think
    Yeah - I saw the number of posts. I guess I just don't understand why we need a new thread.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mandryka View Post
    He’s very good at ornaments too, it has to be said.
    He [Koopman] is sometimes too good at ornaments to my taste, but here [WTC] and in my favorite Bach/Koopman recording [French suites] he is rather successful IMO.

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    Quote Originally Posted by science View Post

    Well, what do you think? Do you love this work? If so, why?

    I think it's not a work, it's at least 2, probably 48, possibly 96.

    I don't mean to just make a pedantic point, I was struck by this when listening to Koopman this morning, how his approach works brilliantly in some pieces but less brilliantly in others.
    Last edited by Mandryka; Jul-24-2018 at 08:11.

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    Senior Member Larkenfield's Avatar
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    Cool

    Mixed feelings about the WTC, perhaps because some of them sound a little dry as if they were written to be instructive or as academic exercises rather than simply to be enjoyed. But I love that he went through all the major and minor keys without having to re-tune the instrument for each one. What a headache that would have been, and I think he took full advantage of his tuning which I think was equal temperament all the way. It saved time, and after all, he had 20 children to raise.
    Last edited by Larkenfield; Jul-25-2018 at 07:57.
    Don’t think. Thinking is the enemy of creativity. It’s self-conscious, and anything self-conscious is lousy. You can’t try to do things. You simply must do things. —Ray Bradbury

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    Quote Originally Posted by Larkenfield View Post
    But I love that he went through all the major and minor keys without having to re-tune the instrument for each one. What a headache that would have been, and I think he took full advantage of his tuning which I think was equal temperament all the way. It saved time, and after all, he had 20 children to raise.
    I would like to see the musicological arguments for your claim.

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    Senior Member San Antone's Avatar
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    Along with the Goldberg Variations, Art of Fugue and A Musical Offering, the Well-Tempered Clavier is one of Bach's works I return to again and again. I consider it a landmark of keyboard literature, right up there with the Beethoven sonatas. The variety of performances is amazing and the music is impervious to interpretive aberrations.

    Much like Shakespeare, the WTC is suitable for high school students as well as musicians of the highest artistic level.

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    These are some comments by Frédérick Haas on WTC

    Although they are considered as two parts of the same collection, they are as different from each other as are the Partitas and the English Suites. The first book is obviously brilliant but a bit hetero* geneous, composed of pieces clearly written at different periods of time. Yet, if the works of youth reveal a person who is rebellious, exuberant, baroque in the accepted sense of the term (according to what little we know about him, Bach was far from being a smart child), the stricter moments are sometimes a little restrained. The second, later, volume is conceived as a whole in its own right and represents, I believe, the accomplishment of a concept to which the composer attached great importance. A great deal of care was taken over it. The result, in terms of scale, coherence and strength, is only comparable to the third Clavierübung. As in all the great works of his maturity, Bach reaches a point of miraculous equilibrium. One can not go any further in terms of formal rigor: The mastery of composition is total—a complexity that literally turns one’s head. And yet everything is deep, sensitive, intense, sometimes overwhelming; a fascinating marriage of the most advanced intellect and the most direct emotion with an incredible variety of musical textures. The prelude in C major is like a prelude for a great organ; the fugue in B flat major is a kind of sinfonia with oboes da caccia. The fugue in B major sounds like a great Amen for choir and orchestra... And then there are all the affects which are identical to the ones found in the Cantatas or the Passions: The prelude in C sharp major, solitary and melancholic; the one in B major, violent and full of revolt; the prelude in D major, dazzling with vitality; or the fugue in F sharp major, which seems to cry with resignation... In short, as soon as they are courted, each piece opens, reveals wonders, and releases a narcotic charm.
    His recent recording is particularly expressive in a lyrical way, I think it’s well worth hearing. He’s clearly thought through the music from scratch as it were.
    Last edited by Mandryka; Jul-25-2018 at 17:57.

  8. Likes Josquin13, science liked this post
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    Last edited by Mandryka; Jul-25-2018 at 20:22.

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