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  1. #16
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    Traditional Scottish Songs... One Tune A Day... August 19th

    "Bonnie Dundee" - The Corries

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zln-AAePtL0

    "Tae the lairds i' convention t'was Claverhouse spoke
    E'er the Kings crown go down, there'll be crowns to be broke;
    Then let each cavalier who loves honour and me,
    Come follow the bonnet o' bonnie Dundee.

    Chorus

    Come fill up my cup, come fill up my can,
    Saddle my horses and call out my men,
    And it's Ho! for the west port and let us gae free,
    And we'll follow the bonnets o' bonnie Dundee!

    Dundee he is mounted, he rides doon the street,
    The bells they ring backwards, the drums they are beat,
    But the Provost, douce man, says "Just e'en let him be,
    For the toon is well rid of that de'il o' Dundee."

    Chorus

    There are hills beyond Pentland and lands beyond Forth,
    Be there lairds i' the south, there are chiefs i' the north!
    There are brave duniwassals, three thousand times three,
    Will cry "Hoy!" for the bonnets o' bonnie Dundee.

    Chorus

    Then awa' to the hills, to the lea, to the rocks,
    E'er I own a usurper, I'll couch wi' the fox!
    Then tremble, false Whigs, in the midst o' your glee,
    Ye ha' no seen the last o' my bonnets and me."


    Bonnie Dundee is the title of a poem and a song written by Walter Scott in 1825 in honour of John Graham, 7th Laird of Claverhouse, who was created 1st Viscount Dundee in November 1688, then in 1689 led a Jacobite rising in which he died, becoming a Jacobite hero.

    The older tune Bonny Dundee adapted by Scott had already been used for several songs appearing under variations of that title and referring to the bonnie town of Dundee rather than to Claverhouse. Scott's song has been used as a regimental march by several Scottish regiments in the British Army and was adapted by Confederate troops during the American Civil War.

  2. #17
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    Traditional Scottish Songs... One Tune A Day... August 20th

    "The Bonnie Earl Of Moray" - Old Blind Dogs

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6Bk28wH0bHc

    "Ye Hielan's an' ye Lowlan's
    O, where have ye been?
    They hae slain the Earl of Moray
    And lain him on the green.
    He was a braw gallant
    And he rode at the ring.
    An' the bonnie Earl of Moray
    O, he micht hae been the king!
    O, lang may his lady
    Look frae the castle Doune,
    Ere she see the Earl of Moray
    Come soundin' through the toun.

    Now way be to thee, Huntly
    And wherefore did ye sae?
    I bade you bring him wi' you
    But forbade you him to slay.
    He was a braw gallant
    And he play'd at the ball
    An' the Bonnie Earl of Moray
    Was a flower among them all.
    Lang may his lady
    Look from the Castle Doune,
    Ere she see the Earl of Moray
    Come soundin' through the toun.

    Ye Hielan's and ye Lowlan's
    O where hae ye been?
    They have slain the Earl of Moray
    An' laid him on the green.
    He was a braw gallant
    And he rode at the gluve
    An' the Bonnie Earl of Moray
    O, he was the Queens' true love.
    Lang will his lady
    Look frae the Castle Doune,
    Ere she see the Earl of Moray
    Come soundin' through the toun."


    "The Bonnie Earl o' Moray" is a popular Scottish ballad, which may date from as early as the 17th century. It is catalogued as Child Ballad No. 181.

    The ballad touches on a true story stemming from the rivalry of James Stewart, Earl of Moray, and the Earl of Huntly, which culminated in Huntly's murder of Moray in 1592. The exact circumstances that led to the murder are not known for certain, but both their families, the Stewarts of Doune and the Gordons of Huntly, had a history of territorial rivalry and competition for royal favour.

    In his notes on the ballad Francis James Child relates how Huntly, eager to prove that Moray was plotting with the Earl of Bothwell against King James VI, received a commission to bring Moray to trial. In the attempt to apprehend Moray, the earl's house at Donibristle in Fife was set on fire and the visiting Sheriff of Moray killed. Moray fled the house, but was chased and killed in its grounds, betrayed, it was said, by the glow of his burning helmet tassle.

    His last words, according to the (probably apocryphal) story related by Walter Scott, deserve special mention. Huntly slashed him across the face with his sword, and as he lay dying Moray said "Ye hae spilt a better face than yer ain" ("You have spoiled a better face than your own"). The killing was widely condemned. Moray's mother, Margaret Campbell, had a painting made of her son's dead body, as evidence of his multiple wounds, bearing the legend "God Revenge My Caus". Her intention was to show this publicly at the Cross in Edinburgh, but the King ignored her request, effectively withholding permission.
    Last edited by Sydney Nova Scotia; Aug-16-2018 at 04:11.

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  4. #18
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    Traditional Scottish Songs... One Tune A Day... August 21st

    "The Bonniest Lass in a' the Warld" - Dave Shannon & Jonny Hardie

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YdDdkglovkc

    "The bonniest lass in a' the warld,
    I've often heard them telling,
    She's up the hill, she's down the glen,
    She's in yon lonely dwelling.
    But nane could bring her to my mind
    Wha lives but in the fancy,
    Is't Kate, or Susie, Jean, or May,
    Is't Effie, Bess, or Nancy?

    Now lasses a' keep a gude heart,
    Nor e'er envy a comrade,
    For be your een black, blue, or gray,
    Ye're bonniest aye to some lad.
    The tender heart, the charming smile,
    The truth that ne'er will falter,
    Are charms that never can beguile,
    And time can never alter."

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  6. #19
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    Traditional Scottish Songs... One Tune A Day... August 22nd

    "Bonnie George Campbell" - Rory and Alex McEwen

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hlRHAEe-ySE

    "High upon Hielands and low upon Tay,
    Bonnie George Campbell rode oot on a day.
    Saddled and bridled, sae bonnie rode he,
    Hame cam' his guid horse, but never came he.

    Saddled and booted and bridled rode he,
    A plume tae his helmet, a sword at his knee.
    But toom came his saddle and bluidy tae see,
    Hame cam' his guid horse, but never came he

    Doon cam' his auld mither greetin' fu' sair,
    Oot cam' his bonnie wife rivin' her hair.
    "My meadows lie green and by corn is unshorn,
    My barn it tae build and my baby's unborn."

    High upon Hielands and low upon Tay,
    Bonnie George Campbell rode oot on a day.
    Saddled and bridled, sae bonnie rode he
    Hame cam' his guid horse, but never came he."



    "Bonnie James Campbell or Bonnie George Campbell is Child ballad 210. The ballad tells of man who has gone off to fight, but only his horse returns. The name differs across variants. Several names have been suggested as the inspiration of the ballad: Archibald or James Campbell, in the Battle of Glenlivet, or Sir John Campbell of Calder, who was murdered."

    "Bonnie James (or George) Campbell rides out one day. His horse returns, but he does not. His bride comes out, grieving, that the fields are still growing the harvest but he will never return. In some variants, his mother or sisters also come out when his horse returns. In one of the variants, Campbell laments that "my babe is unborn.""

  7. #20
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    Traditional Scottish Songs... One Tune A Day... August 23rd

    "The Bonnie Hoose o' Airlie" - Ewan MacColl

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-FfU2dqFVjY

    "It fell on a day, on a bonnie summer's day,
    When the sun shone bright and clearly,
    That there fell oot a great dispute
    Atween Argyll and Airlie.

    Argyll he has mustered a thousand o' his men,
    He has marched them oot richt early;
    He has marched them in by the back o' Dunkeld,
    To plunder the bonnie hoose o' Airlie.

    Lady Ogilvie she looked frae her window sae high,
    And O but she grat sairly,
    To see Argyll and a' his men
    Come to plunder the bonnie hoose o' Airlie.

    "Come doon, come doon, Lady Ogilvie" he cried:
    "Come doon and kiss me fairly,
    Or I swear by the hilt o'my guid braidsword
    That I winna leave a stan'in' stane in Airlie."

    "I winna come doon, ye cruel Argyll,
    I winna kiss ye fairly;
    I wadna kiss ye, fause Argyll,
    Though ye sudna leave a stan'in' stane in Airlie."

    "Come tell me whaur your dowry is hid,
    Come doon and tell me fairly."
    "I winna tell ye whaur my dowry is hid,
    Though ye sudna leave a stan'in' stane in Airlie."

    They socht it up and they socht it doon,
    I wat they socht it early;
    And it was below yon bowling green
    They found the dowrie o' Airlie.

    "Eleven bairns I hae born
    And the twelfth ne'er saw his daddie,
    But though I had gotten as mony again,
    They sud a' gang to fecht for Charlie.

    "Gin my guid lord had been at hame,
    As he's awa' for Charlie,
    There dursna a Campbell o' a' Argyll
    Set a fit on the bonnie hoose o' Airlie."

    He's ta'en her by the milk-white hand,
    But he didna lead her fairly;
    He led her up to the tap o' the hill,
    Whaur she saw the burnin' o' Airlie.

    The smoke and flame they rose so high
    The walls they were blackened fairly;
    And the lady laid her doon on the green to dee
    When she saw the burnin' o' Airlie."


    "The Bonnie House of Airlie is a traditional Scottish folk song of the seventeenth century, telling the tale of the raid by Archibald Campbell, Earl of Argyll, on Airlie Castle, the home of James Ogilvy, Earl of Airlie, in the summer of 1640. A broadsheet version first appeared in 1790 and it received formal publication as number 199 in Francis Child's collection The English and Scottish Popular Ballads of 1882."

    "Although there had been traditional enmity between the Campbells and Ogilvys since at least the sixteenth century, their private feud intensified in 1638, when the two clans joined opposite sides in the National Covenant rebellion: Ogilvy supported the king, Charles I, and Campbell the rebels. When James Ogilvy raised a regiment of several hundred men and marched south to the king's aid, Archibald, claiming to act on behalf of the anti-royalist alliance, seized and destroyed the castle of Airlie and, according to some accounts, brutally raped James Ogilvy's wife, Margaret."

  8. #21
    Sydney Nova Scotia
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    Traditional Scottish Songs... One Tune A Day... August 24th

    "Bonnie Lass of Fyvie" - Ewan MacColl & Peggy Seeger

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K837d7-0hRc

    "There once was a troop of Irish dragoons
    Come marching down thru Fyfie, O.
    And the captain fell in love with a very bonnie lass
    And the name she was called was pretty Peggy-o.

    There's many a bonnie lass in the glen of Auchterless
    There's many a bonnie lass in Garioch-o
    There's many a bonnie Jean in the streets of Aberdeen
    But the flower of them all lives in Fyvie, O.

    O come down the stairs, Pretty Peggy, my dear
    Come down the stairs, Pretty Peggy-o
    Come down the stairs, comb back your yellow hair
    Bid a long farewell to your mammy-o.

    It's braw, aye it's braw, a captain's lady for to be
    And it's braw to be a captain's lady-o.
    It's braw to ride around and to follow the camp,
    And to ride when your captain he is ready-o.

    O I'll give you ribbons, love, and I'll give you rings,
    I'll give you a necklace of amber-o,
    I'll give you a silken petticoat with flounces to the knee,
    If you'll convey me doon to your chamber-o.

    What would your mother think if she heard the guineas clink
    And saw the haut-boys marching all before you O?
    O little would she think gin she heard the guineas clink,
    If I followed a soldier laddie-o.

    I never did intend a soldier's lady for to be,
    A soldier shall never enjoy me-o.
    I never did intend to gae tae a foreign land
    And I will never marry a soldier-o.

    I'll drink nae more o your claret wine,
    I'll drink nae more o your glasses-o.
    Tomorrow is the day when we maun ride away,
    So farewell tae your Fyvie lasses-o.

    The colonel he cried, mount, boys, mount,boys, mount.
    The captain, he cried, tarry-o.
    O tarry yet a while, just another day or twa,
    Til I see if the bonnie lass will marry-o.

    Twas in the early morning, when we marched awa,
    And O but the captain he was sorry-o.
    The drums they did beat a merry brasselgeicht,
    And the band played the bonnie lass of Fyvie, O.

    Long ere we came to the glen of Auchterlass,
    We had our captain to carry-o.
    And long ere we won into the streets of Aberdeen
    We had our captain to bury-o.

    Green grow the birks on bonnie Ethanside,
    And low lie the lowlands of Fyvie, O.
    The captain's name was Ned and he died for a maid,
    He died for the bonny lass of Fyvie, O."

    "The Bonnie Lass o' Fyvie (Roud # 545) is a Scottish folk song about a thwarted romance between a soldier and a girl. Like many folk songs, the authorship is unattributed, there is no strict version of the lyrics, and it is often referred to by its opening line "There once was a troop o' Irish dragoons". The song is also known by a variety of other names, the most common of them being "Peggy-O", "Fennario", and "The Maid of Fife"."
    Last edited by Sydney Nova Scotia; Aug-16-2018 at 12:12.

  9. #22
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    Traditional Scottish Songs... One Tune A Day... August 25th

    "Bonnie Leezie Lindsay" - Sir Harry Lauder

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cNPRIvAhZCg

    "Of sweethearts I have had a lot,
    But their names and faces I've not forgot,
    For as sure as I stand on this spot,
    I'm in love wi' bonnie Leezie Lindsay.
    When first I saw her bonnie wee face,
    It was love at first sight in my case.
    My heart it nearly left it's place,
    When I saw my bonnie Leezie Lindsay.

    Chorus

    For I'm coortin' bonnie Leezie Lindsay noo,
    Coortin' bonnie Leezie Lindsay noo,
    In ma time I have had a few,
    But I'm coortin' bonnie Leezie Lindsay noo

    Chorus

    Last winter when the frost was on
    We both went skatin' on Loch Long.
    Of coorse I had my troosers on,
    I always do when I go skatin'!
    As we went glidin' o'er the ice,
    I was very near doon once or twice,
    But Leezie sav'd me very very nice,
    For o' me she's very very careful!

    Chorus

    We went on a motoring tour last June,
    We started frae the toon o' Troon,
    Up mauntains, valleys roon' ,
    Till we landed at Balmoral Castle.
    So when the king and the queen saw me,
    We both were invited in to tea,
    Then the king said to me, I'm very pleased to see,
    That yer coortin' bonnie Leezie Lindsay.

    Last Chorus

    "Yer coortin' bonnie Leezie Lindsay noo,
    Coortin' bonnie Lindsay noo,
    I would give a fiver to be you,
    To be coortin' bonnie Leezie Lindsay noo"
    Last edited by Sydney Nova Scotia; Aug-16-2018 at 13:40.

  10. #23
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    Traditional Scottish Songs... One Tune A Day... August 26th


    "Bonnie Strathyre" - Andy Stewart

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fD68V4sE1xo

    "There's meadows in Lanark and mountains in Skye,

    And pastures in Hielands and Lowlands forbye;
    But there's nae greater luck that the heart could desire
    Than to herd the fine cattle in bonnie Strathyre.

    O' it's up in the morn and awa' to the hill,

    When the lang simmer days are sae warm and sae still,
    Till the peak O' Ben Vorlich is girdled wi' fire,
    And the evenin' fa's gently on bonnie Strathyre.

    Then there's mirth in the sheiling and love in my breast,

    When the sun is gane doun and the kye are at rest;
    For there's mony a prince wad be proud to aspire
    To my winsome wee Maggie, the pride O' Strathyre.

    Her lips are like rowans in ripe simmer seen,

    And mild as the starlicht the glint o' her e'en;
    Far sweeter her breath than the scent o' the briar,
    And her voice is sweet music in bonnie Strathyre.

    Set Flora by Colin, and Maggie by me,

    And we'll dance to the pipes swellin' loudly and free,
    Till the moon in the heavens climbing higher and higher
    Bids us sleep on fresh brackens in bonnie Strathyre.

    Though some in the touns o' the Lowlands seek fame,

    And some will gang sodgerin' far from their hame;
    Yet I'll aye herd my cattle, and bigg my ain byre,
    And love my ain Maggie in bonnie Strathyre."

  11. #24
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    Traditional Scottish Songs... One Tune A Day... August 27th

    "Bonnie Wee Jeannie McColl" - The Alexander Brothers

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0zrjV0bHWP8

    "Chorus

    A fine wee lass, a bonnie wee lass, is bonnie wee Jeannie McColl;
    I gave her my mother's engagement ring and a bonnie wee tartan shawl.
    I met her at a waddin' in the Co-operative Hall
    I wis the best man and she was the belle of the ball.

    The very first nicht I met her, she was awfy, awfy shy,
    The rain cam' pourin' doon, but she was happy, so was I.
    We ran like mad for shelter, an' we landed up a stair,
    The rain cam' poorin' oot o' ma breeks, but och I didna care:
    For she's.....

    Chorus

    Noo I've wad my Jeannie, an' bairnies we have three,
    Two dochters and a braw wee lad, that sits upon my knee.
    They're richt wee holy terrors, an' they're never still for lang,
    But they sit an' listen every nicht, while I sing to them this sang:
    Oh it's ....

    Chorus


  12. #25
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    Traditional Scottish Songs... One Tune A Day... August 28th

    "Bonnie Wee Thing" - Peter Mallan & Duncan MacRae

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6mrbBc5PpRo

    "Chorus

    Bonnie wee thing, cannie wee thing,
    Lovely wee thing wer't thou mine,
    I wad wear thee in my bosom,
    Lest my jewel I should tine.

    Wistfully, I look and languish
    In that bonnie face of thine.
    And my heart it stounds wi' anguish
    Lest my wee thing be na mine.

    Chorus

    Wit and Grace and Love and Beauty
    In ae constellation shine!
    To adore thee is my duty
    Goddess o' this soul o' mine!

    Chorus"


  13. #26
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    Traditional Scottish Songs... One Tune A Day... August 29th

    "Bonnie Wells o' Wearie" - Kenneth McKellar

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9YuUyChrXEY

    "Come let us climb auld Arthur Seat,
    When summer flow'rs are blooming;
    When golden broom and heather bells
    Are a' the air perfuming.
    When sweet May gowans deck the braes,
    The hours flee past fu' cheerie,
    Where bonnie lassies bleach their claes
    Beside the Wells o' Wearie!

    Chorus:

    The bonnie Wells o' Wearie!
    The bonnie Wells o' Wearie!
    Come let us spend a summer day
    Beside the Wells o' Wearie!

    The "Lily o' St. Leonards" there
    Oft spent a sweet May morning,
    Wi' gowans gay and sweet blue-bells
    Her golden locks adorning.
    And there the "Laird o' Dumbiedikes"
    Aft gaed to woo his dearie,
    And watch his fleecy flocks wi' care,
    Beside the Wells o' Wearie!

    Chorus:

    There Scotland's Queen in stormy times
    Forgot her saddest story;
    There brave Prince Charlie led his clans
    To deeds o' martial glory.
    When Johnnie Cope, wi' a' his men
    Were scatter'd tamplinteerie,
    There Scotland's banner proudly waved
    Beside the Wells o' Wearie!

    Chorus:

    Then let us hail auld Arthur Seat:
    Like Scotland's rampant lion,
    It tow'rs, a wonder o' the world,
    The wildest storms defyin'.
    Wi' dauntless front 'neath summer skies,
    Or wintry blasts sae dreary,
    It stands in peace or war to guard
    The bonnie Wells o' Wearie!

    Chorus:

    O lang may bonnie lassies fair
    Wi' Nature's charms around them,
    Still bleach their claes on flow'ry braes,
    Wi' nae sad cares to wound them!
    Lang may her sons 'mid fairy scenes,
    Wi' hearts richt leal and cheerie,
    Still meet to sing their patriot sangs
    Beside the Wells o' Wearie!"


    "The "Wells o' Wearie" used to be at the southern end of Holyrood Park in Edinburgh. Arthur's Seat, mentioned in the song, is close by and the Lily of St Leonard's and the Laird in the 2nd verse are characters in Scott's "Heart of Midlothian"."

  14. #27
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    Traditional Scottish Songs... One Tune A Day... August 29th

    "Braes of Balquhidder" - The Tannahill Weavers

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k6mKGvr15Wg

    "Will you go lassie go
    To the braes of Balquidder
    Where the high mountains run
    And the bonnie blooming heather
    Where the ram and the deer
    They go bounding together
    Spend a long summer day
    By the braes of Balquidder

    Oh no sir, she said,
    I am too young to be your lover
    For my age is scarce sixteen
    And I dare not for my mother
    And beside being so young
    I am afraid you're some deceiver
    That have come to charm me here
    By the braes of Balquidder

    Your beauty soon will alter
    I will deprive you of this chance
    And live happy with some other
    I will roam this world all over
    Until I find some maid of honour
    That will go along with me
    To the braes of Balquidder

    Oh come back, oh come back
    For I think you're no deceiver
    Oh come back, oh come back
    I will never love none other
    I will leave all my friends
    Father, Mother, Sister, Brother
    And I will go along with you
    To the braes of Balquidder

    Oh now they have gone
    To that bonnie highland mountain
    For to view the green fields
    Likewise its silvery fountain
    Its there they are united
    And joined in love together
    Spend a long summer day
    By the braes of Balquidder"
    Last edited by Sydney Nova Scotia; Aug-16-2018 at 13:26.

  15. #28
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    Traditional Scottish Songs... One Tune A Day... August 30th

    "The Braes o' Gleniffer" - Jock Tamson's Bairns

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rkPhsy3Po60


    "Keen blaws the wind o'er the Braes o' Gleniffer.
    The auld castle's turrets are cover'd wi' snaw;
    How chang'd frae the time when I met wi' my lover
    Amang the broom bushes by Stanley green shaw:
    The wild flow'rs o' simmer were spread a' sae bonnie,
    The mavis sang sweet frae the green birken tree:
    But far to the camp they hae march'd my dear Johnnie,
    And now it is winter wi' nature and me.

    Then ilk thing around us was blithesome and cheery,
    Then ilk thing around us was bonny and braw;
    Now naething is heard but the wind whistling dreary,
    And naething is seen but the wide-spreading snaw.
    The trees are a' bare, and the birds mute and dowie,
    They shake the cauld drift frae their wings as they flee,
    And chirp out their plaints, seeming wae for my Johnnie,--
    'Tis winter wi' them, and 'tis winter wi' me.

    Yon cauld sleety cloud skiffs alang the bleak mountain,
    And shakes the dark firs on the stey rocky brae,
    While down the deep glen bawls the snaw-flooded fountain,
    That murmur'd sae sweet to my laddie and me.
    'Tis no its loud roar on the wintry wind swellin',
    'Tis no the cauld blast brings the tears i' my e'e,
    For, O gin I saw but my bonny Scotch callan,
    The dark days o' winter were simmer to me!"


    "Robert Tannahill was born in Paisley (there is a memorial plaque at his birthplace in Castle Street) and the Glennifer Braes are only a few miles south of there and his poetry was often inspired by the countryside around Paisley. Despite having a deformity in his right leg, he would go for long walks in the Gleniffer Braes above the town. The Braes o' Gleniffer is one of his best-known songs."

  16. #29
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    Traditional Scottish Songs... One Tune A Day... August 31st

    "Breakfast in My Bed on Sunday Morning" - Sir Harry Lauder

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bN8cQz_qUeg

    "I never, never worry, worry, and I never, never grieve.
    I take things nice and easy - what I canna take, I leave.
    I work the whole week round, frae early morn till late at nicht.
    On Saturday, I eagerly look forword wae delicht to....

    Chorus

    Beautiful Sunday! I wish it would never come Monday!
    For I lie between the sheets my bed adornin'!
    O, it's very nice, yes it's very very nice
    To get yer breakfast in yer bed on Sunday morning.

    What joy, what great delicht it is, to hear the kirk bells ring!
    I wouldn't miss their welcome sound, no not for anythin'
    When they commence to ring, I rise, but if it looks like rain,
    I fill my pipe, then licht it, and go back to bed again on...

    Chorus (twice)"

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    A rather sweet but sad song of the Scottish diaspora. Being an immigrant myself this one touches the heart.

    The words (mostly) are by the Canadian poet Alexander Glendinning, and the the tune is based on 'Miss Admiral Gordon's Strathspey', an otherwise jolly reel by William Marshall (1748–1833).

    I don't know who was first to put the words and the music together, but the version I have is by Stan Rogers. I also have the Jean Redpath version which is very nice as well.


    Stan Rogers - Scarborough Settler's Lament
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CNS4u9b7U4U


    Away with Canada's muddy creeks
    And Canada's fields of pine
    Your land of wheat is a goodly land,
    But oh, it is not mine.
    The heathy hill, the grassy dale.
    The daisy spangled lea,
    The purling burn and craggy linn
    Auld Scotia's land give me.

    Oh, I would like to hear again
    The lark on Tinny's hill
    And see the wee bit gowany
    That blooms beside the rill.
    Like banished Swiss who views afar
    His Alps with longing e'e.
    I gaze upon the morning star
    That shines on my country.

    No more I'll win by Eskdale Pen
    Or Pentland's craggy comb.
    The days can ne'er come back again
    Of thirty years that's gone,
    But fancy oft at midnight hour
    Will steal across the sea.
    Yestre'en amidst a pleasant dream
    I saw my own country.

    Each scene that met my view
    Brought childhood's joys to mind.
    The blackbird sang on Tushey linn
    The song he sang lang syne.
    But like a dream time flies away
    Again the morning came.
    And I awoke in Canada,
    Three thousand miles from hame.

    Best wishes
    Metairie Road
    Last edited by Metairie Road; Aug-18-2018 at 12:43.

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