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Thread: Traditional Scottish Songs - One Tune A Day...

  1. #91
    Senior Member Merl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Donny Brook View Post
    Traditional Scottish Songs... One Tune A Day... January 12th...

    "The Northern Lights of Old Aberdeen" - The Alexander Brothers

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jhq5HpabEL4

    Attachment 111482

    "Chorus:

    The Northern Lights of Aberdeen are what I long to see;
    The Northern Lights of Aberdeen, that's where I long to be.
    I've been a wand'rer all of my life and many a sight I've seen.
    God speed the day when I'm on my way to my home in Aberdeen.

    When I was a lad, a tiny wee lad, my mother said to me,
    "Come see the Northern Lights my boy, they're bright as they can be."
    She called them the heavenly dancers, merry dancers in the sky,
    I'll never forget that wonderful sight, they made the heavens bright.

    Chorus:

    The Northern Lights of Aberdeen are what I long to see;
    The Northern Lights of Aberdeen, that's where I long to be.
    I've been a wand'rer all of my life and many a sight I've seen.
    God speed the day when I'm on my way to my home in Aberdeen.

    I've wandered in many far-off lands, and travelled many a mile,
    I've missed the folk I've cherished most, the joy of a friendly smile.
    It warms up the heart of the wand'rer the clasp of a welcoming hand.
    To greet me when I return, home to my native land.

    Chorus:

    The Northern Lights of Aberdeen are what I long to see;
    The Northern Lights of Aberdeen, that's where I long to be.
    I've been a wand'rer all of my life and many a sight I've seen.
    God speed the day when I'm on my way to my home in Aberdeen. "
    There were two Aberdeen football fans singing this in a pub I went in, in Aberdeen, in December. No one else seemed to have heard it before. It was a new one on me.

  2. #92
    Donny Brook
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    Quote Originally Posted by Merl View Post
    There were two Aberdeen football fans singing this in a pub I went in, in Aberdeen, in December. No one else seemed to have heard it before. It was a new one on me.
    If only two people were singing that tune in a pub in Aberdeen that means that they were the only two people in the pub who were actually from Aberdeen - everyone else was from somewhere else -

    This is how its supposed to sound -



    "The Northern Lights of Old Aberdeen song is a traditional Scottish song written by Mary Webb for a home sick Aberdonian lass who she worked with in a hospital kitchen. Mary Webb was English and lived in London and had never been to Aberdeen, Scotland. She was born in Leamington Spa and was a concert pianist.

    Her fellow worker was invited to Mary's house for tea and when they were talking about Aberdeen Mary asked if that was where the Aurora Borealis, the Northern Lights, could be seen. Mary Webb composed the words to Northern Lights of Old Aberdeen to cheer up the homesick woman."
    Last edited by Donny Brook; Jan-10-2019 at 05:36.

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  4. #93
    Donny Brook
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    Traditional Scottish Songs... One Tune A Day... January 13th...

    "O Can Ye Sew Cushions?" - Jean Redpath

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4rNZBED858Y

    untitled.jpg

    "O Can Ye Sew Cushions? And can ye sew sheets?
    And can ye sing ballooloo when the bairn greets?
    And hee and haw birdie, and hee and haw lamb;
    And hee and haw, birdie, my bonnie wee lamb!

    Chorus:

    Heeo, weeo, what wou'd I do wi' you?
    Black's the life that I lead wi' you;
    Mony o' ye, Little for to gie you.
    Heeo, weeo, what wou'd I do wi' you?

    I biggit the cradle upon the treetop,
    And aye as the wind blew, my cradle did rock.
    And hush a baw baby, O ba lil li loo,
    And hee and baw, birdie, my bonnie wee doo.

    Chorus

    Now hush a baw lammie, and hush a baw dear,
    Now hush a baw lammie, thy minnie is here.
    The wild wind is ravin', thy minnie's heart sair,
    The wild wind is ravin', but ye dinna care.

    Chorus

    Sing bal la loo lammie, sing bal la loo dear,
    Does wee lammie ken that its daddie's no here?
    Ye're rockin' fu' sweetly on mammie's warm knee,
    But daddie's a rockin' upon the saut sea.

    Chorus "

  5. #94
    Donny Brook
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    Traditional Scottish Songs... One Tune A Day... January 14th...

    "Oh, What a Parish!" - Silly Wizard

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BkgC7wiG68M

    untitled.png

    "Oh, what a parish, a terrible parish
    Oh, what a parish is that o' Dunkel';
    They hangit their minister, droon'd their precentor,
    Dang doon the steeple and fuddled the bell.
    The steeple was doon, but the kirk was still staun'in';
    So they biggit a lum whaur the bell used tae hang.
    A still-pot they got and they brewed Hieland whisky;
    On Sundays they drank it and ranted and sang.

    Oh, had ye but seen how gracefu' they lookit,
    Crammed in the pews - socially joined.
    MacDonald the piper struck up in the poopit.
    He made the pipes skirl wi' music devine
    When drink free'd their care they would curse and they'd swear;
    They ranted and sang what they darena weel tell;
    "Bout Geordie and Cherlie they bothered fu' rarely,
    Wi' whisky they're worse than the Devil himsel'.

    When the heart-cheerin' spirit had mounted their garrets,
    Tae a ball on the green they a' did ajourn.
    The maids in coats kilted then steppit and lilted;
    When tired or dry tae the kirk they'd return.
    If kirks a' owre Scodand held sic social meetings,
    Nae warnin' they'd need frae a far-tinklin' bell,
    For kindness and friendship would ca' them thegither,
    Far better than roarin' the horrors o' Hell.

    Oh, what a parish, a terrible parish.
    Oh, what a parish is that o' Dunkel'.
    They hangit their Minister, droon'd their Precentor,
    Dang doon the steeple and fuddled the bell.
    But let me advise ye that mischief there lies,
    When neebours are drinkin wi' mair than themselves.
    O' yer heart and yer hand try tae keep some command,
    Or ye'll end up as bad as the folk o' Dunkel'"

  6. #95
    Donny Brook
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    Traditional Scottish Songs... One Tune A Day... January 15th...

    "Of A' The Airts" - Eddie Reader

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7duJAhoZgbs

    untitled.jpg

    "Of a' the airts the wind can blaw
    I dearly like the west,
    For there the bonnie lassie lives,
    The lassie I lo'e best.
    There wild woods grow, and rivers row,
    And monie a hill between,
    But day and night my fancy's flight
    Is ever wi' my Jean.

    I see her in the dewy flowers -
    I see her sweet and fair,
    I hear her in the tunefu' birds -
    I hear her charm the air.
    There's not a bonnie flower that springs
    By fountain, shaw or green.
    There's not a bonnie bird that sings
    But minds me o' my Jean."

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  8. #96
    Donny Brook
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    Traditional Scottish Songs... One Tune A Day... January 16th...

    "The Piper o' Dundee" - The Alexander Brothers

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mCV50C5ZJIA

    untitled.jpg

    "The piper came to our town,
    To our town, to our town
    The piper came to our town
    And he played so bonnielie
    He play'd a spring the laird to please
    A spring brent new from 'yont the seas
    And then he gae his bags a squeeze
    And played anither key

    Chorus:

    And wasna he a rougey, a rougey, a rougey,
    And wasna he a rougey, the piper o' Dundee
    He play'd "The Welcome Ower the Main"
    And "Ye's Be Fou and I'se be Fain"
    And "Auld Stuart's Back Again"
    Wi' muckle mirth and glee.
    He play'd "The Kirk", he play'd "The Queen"
    "The Mullin Dhu" and "Chevalier"
    And "Lang Awa' But Welcome Here"
    Sae sweet, sae bonnielie

    Chorus:

    It's some gat swords and some gat nane
    And some were dancing mad their lane
    And mony a vow o' weir was ta'en
    That night at Amulrie.
    There was Tillibardine, and Burleigh
    And Struan, Keith, and Olgivie,
    And brave Carnegie, wha' but he,
    The piper o' Dundee.

    Chorus: "

  9. #97
    Senior Member Ingélou's Avatar
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    Surely the piper of Dundee was a 'roguey' or 'roguie', i.e. a bit of a rogue, rather than a 'rougey', which brings make-up to my mind - though I suppose it was the eighteenth century.

    Struan, in the last verse, was my ancestral Clan Chief.

    I love this song, probably because my father was a Dundonian and we'd visit my grandparents there.

    'Roond and roond the Albert Institute, the spuggies flew in and oot.' - a scrap of Dundee childlore.
    Last edited by Ingélou; Jan-13-2019 at 17:08.
    ~ Mollie ~
    My fiddle my joy.

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  11. #98
    Donny Brook
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ingélou View Post
    Surely the piper of Dundee was a 'roguey' or 'roguie', i.e. a bit of a rogue, rather than a 'rougey', which brings make-up to my mind - though I suppose it was the eighteenth century.

    Struan, in the last verse, was my ancestral Clan Chief.

    I love this song, probably because my father was a Dundonian and we'd visit my grandparents there.

    'Roond and roond the Albert Institute, the spuggies flew in and oot.' - a scrap of Dundee childlore.



    https://www.lyricsfreak.com/u/unknow..._20294725.html

    http://www.rampantscotland.com/songs...iperdundee.htm

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  13. #99
    Senior Member Ingélou's Avatar
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    Thanks - though in fact I'd already looked these links up.

    I'm afraid they've got it wrong, though, even if they're quoting an ancient source, because you don't spell 'roguey' (or 'roguie') like that - 'rouge' and 'rogue' are different words pronounced differently, and you need the 'u' after the 'g' to keep the hard sound of the 'g' in the word 'rogue' which is what is meant here (with the Scots sardonic diminutive -ie tacked on).

    My preferred version, which I grew up with - and clearly pronounced 'roguie' in the chorus.



    Here's one link for the lyrics- a Scottish site - that actually gets the spelling right.
    http://www.glasgowguide.co.uk/wjmc/thepiper.shtml

    Interestingly, for me at any rate, both in the Alex Campbell version and the Glasgow-site lyrics, it isn't Struan at all in the last verse, which makes sense, as Struan Robertson played a very small part in the Jacobite risings. He was a rotten soldier, and not a particularly good poet, despite his sobriquet of 'Poet Chief'.
    http://www.stridentpublishing.co.uk/...uan-1670-1749/

    Thanks for posting, @Donny Brook - glad to be reminded of this song.
    Last edited by Ingélou; Jan-13-2019 at 19:11.
    ~ Mollie ~
    My fiddle my joy.

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    Senior Member LezLee's Avatar
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    From the wonderful and much missed Michael Marra. I think ‘Hermless’ could easily become ‘traditional’.

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  17. #101
    Senior Member LezLee's Avatar
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    More Michael Marra with the beautiful ‘All Will Be Well’.

    Oops! Sorry, forgot it was only one tune a day
    Last edited by LezLee; Jan-13-2019 at 19:38.

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  19. #102
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    @sydneynovascotia - brilliant thread - my compliments! -

    Great idea to provide the Scots lyrics but it might have been a good idea to provide translations for some of the words and phrases used. Out of profound respect for both you and your thread allow me to add something to your thread that many may find of value -

    Old Scottish sayings -

    I’ll gie ye a skelpit lug! – I’ll give you a slap on the ear.

    Whit’s fur ye’ll no go by ye! – What’s meant to happen will happen.

    Skinny Malinky Longlegs! – A tall thin person.

    Lang may yer lum reek! – May you live long and stay well.

    Speak o’ the Devil! – Usually said when you have been talking about someone – they usually appear.

    Black as the Earl of Hell’s Waistcoat! – Pitch black.

    Failing means yer playin! – When you fail at something at least you’re trying.

    Mony a mickle maks a muckle! – Saving a small amount soon builds up to a large amount.

    Keep the heid! – Stay calm, don’t get upset.

    We’re a’ Jock Tamson’s bairns! – We’re all God’s children, nobody is better than anybody else – we’re all equal.

    Dinnae teach yer Granny tae suck eggs! – Don’t try to teach someone something they already know.

    Dinnae marry fur money! – Don’t marry for money – you can borrow it cheaper.

    Is the cat deid? – Has the cat died? Means your trousers are a bit short – like a flag flying at half mast.

    The baw’s on the slates – Game over. In our younger days we played football in the street. If the ball landed on a roof, the game was over.

    Haud yer wheesht! – Be quiet.

    Noo jist haud on! – Now just hold it, slow down, take your time.

    Hell slap it intae ye! – Means it’s your own fault.

    I’m fair puckled! – I’m short of breath.

    Do yer dinger. – Loudly express disapproval.

    Gie it laldy. – Do something with gusto.

    Gonnae no’ dae that! – Going to not do that.

    At dis ma nut in – That does my head in.

    Pure dead brilliant – Exceptionally good.

    Yer bum’s oot the windae – You’re talking rubbish.

    Awa’ an bile yer heid – Away and boil your head.

    Am pure done in – I’m feeling very tired.

    Am a pure nick – I don’t look very presentable.

    Ah umnae – I am not.

    Ma heid’s mince – My head’s a bit mixed up.

    Ma heid’s loupin’ – My head is sore.

    Yer oot yer face! – You’re very drunk.

    Yer aff yer heid – You’re off your head – a little bit daft.

    Ah dinnae ken. – I don’t know.

    Haste Ye Back! – Farewell saying meaning “return soon”.

    It’s a dreich day! – Said in reference to the weather, when it’s cold, damp and miserable.

    Some Scottish words and slang….

    Aboot – About
    Ain – Own
    Auld – Old
    Aye – Yes
    Bahooky – Backside, bum
    Bairn – Baby
    Baw – Ball
    Bawface – Describes someone with a big round face.
    Ben – Mountain, or through
    Bide – Depending on the context, means wait, or stay.
    Blether – Talkative, when referred to a person. To “have a blether” is to have a chat.
    Boke – Vomit. “He gies me the boke”. He makes me want to vomit.
    Bonnie – Beautiful
    Bowfing – Smelly, horrible
    Braw – Good, or brilliant
    Breeks – Trousers
    Coo – Cow
    Crabbit – Bad tempered
    Cry – Call, as in what do you cry him?
    Dae – Do
    Dauner – Walk – “I’m away for a dauner”
    Didnae – Didn’t
    Dinnae – Don’t
    Drap – Drop
    Dreep – Drip
    Drookit – Soaking wet
    Dug – Dog
    Dunderheid, Eejit, Galoot, Numptie – All mean idiot
    Dunt – Bump
    Feart – Afraid
    Frae – From
    Gallus – Bravado, over-confident
    Gang – Go
    Gaunnae – Going to
    Geeza haun – Give me a hand (help me).
    Geggie – Mouth, as in “shut your geggie”
    Glaikit – Stupid, slow on the uptake
    Goonie – Nightgown
    Greet – Cry
    Gumption – Common sense, initiative
    Hae – Have
    Hame – Home
    Haud – Hold
    Haver – Talk rubbish
    Hing – Hang
    Hoachin’ – Very busy
    Hokin’ – Rummaging
    Honkin’, Hummin’, Howlin’ – Bad smell
    Hoose – House
    Hunner – Hundred
    Huvnae – Haven’t
    Keek – A little look
    Ken – Know
    Lum – Chimney
    Mair – More
    Merrit – Married
    Mockit, Manky, Mingin’, Boggin’ – All mean dirty
    Moose – Mouse
    Naw – No
    Neep, Tumshie – Turnip
    Noo – Now
    Oot – Out
    Peely Wally – Pale
    Piece – A sandwich
    Poke – (to poke – to prod) (a poke – a paper bag)
    Reek – Smell, emit smoke
    Riddy – A red face, embarrassed
    Sassenach – From the Gaelic word sasunnach, meaning Saxon, and used to describe non-Gaelic speaking Scottish Lowlanders (and our English friends).
    Screwball – Unhinged, mad
    Scullery – Kitchen
    Scunnered – Bored, fed up
    Shoogle – Shake
    Shoogly – Shaky, wobbly
    Simmet – Gents singlet
    Skelp – Slap
    Skoosh – Lemonade (or fizzy drink)
    Sleekit – Sly
    Stookie – Plaster cast (for a broken bone)
    Stour – Dust
    Tattie – Potato
    Telt – Told
    Thon – That
    Totie – Very small
    Wean – Child
    Wellies – Wellington boots
    Whit – What
    Willnae – Will not
    Widnae – Would not
    Windae – Window
    Wummin – Women
    Ye – You
    Yer – Your
    Yin – One

    Not bad for a French-Canadian guy, eh? I have no idea as to how accurate this list is - perhaps some of our members from the UK can offer clarification - Taggart's a Glaswegian - perhaps he'll stop by and offer his services -

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  21. #103
    Senior Member Victor Redseal's Avatar
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    For many years now, I've tried to figure out the spiel at the second half o' this. I can only make out the last line thanks to Jimi Hendrix. Anyone game?
    "God," asked Adam, "why did you make Eve so beautiful?"
    And He replied, "So that you could love her."
    "But God," asked Adam, "why did you make her so stupid?"
    And He replied, "So that she could love you."

  22. #104
    Senior Member Barbebleu's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sydney Nova Scotia View Post
    Traditional Scottish Songs... One Tune A Day... August 7th...

    "100 Pipers"

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l286QgBHP5o

    "Wi' a hundred pipers, an' a', an' a',
    Wi' a hundred pipers, an' a', an' a',
    We'll up an' gie them a blaw, a blaw,
    Wi' a hundred pipers, an' a', an' a'.
    O it's owre the border awa', awa'
    It's owre the border awa', awa',
    We'll on an' we'll march to Carlisle ha'
    Wi' its yetts, its castle an' a', an a'.

    Chorus:

    Wi' a hundred pipers, an' a', an' a',
    Wi' a hundred pipers, an' a', an' a',
    We'll up an' gie them a blaw, a blaw
    Wi' a hundred pipers, an' a', an' a'.

    O! our sodger lads looked braw, looked braw,
    Wi' their tartan kilts an' a', an' a',
    Wi' their bonnets an' feathers an' glitt'rin' gear,
    An' pibrochs sounding loud and clear.
    Will they a' return to their ain dear glen?
    Will they a' return oor Heilan' men?
    Second sichted Sandy looked fu' wae.
    An' mithers grat when they march'd away.

    Chorus:

    O! wha' is foremos o' a', o' a',
    Oh wha' is foremost o' a', o' a',
    Bonnie Charlie the King o' us a', hurrah!
    Wi' his hundred pipers an' a', an ' a'.
    His bonnet and feathers he's waving high,
    His prancing steed maist seems to fly,
    The nor' win' plays wi' his curly hair,
    While the pipers play wi'an unco flare.

    Chorus:

    The Esk was swollen sae red an' sae deep,
    But shouther to shouther the brave lads keep;
    Twa thousand swam owre to fell English ground
    An' danced themselves dry to the pibroch's sound.
    Dumfoun'er'd the English saw, they saw,
    Dumfoun'er'd they heard the blaw, the blaw,
    Dumfoun'er'd they a' ran awa', awa',
    Frae the hundred pipers an' a', an' a'.
    Did you know that there’s a Scotch whisky called 100 Snipers? One dram and it blaws yer heid aff (blows your head off).
    Last edited by Barbebleu; Feb-14-2019 at 12:28.
    Remember that the lesser of two evils is still evil

  23. #105
    Senior Member Barbebleu's Avatar
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    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=Zch5NQcmWKI

    Hamish Imlach - Cod Liver Oil and the Orange Juice.
    Remember that the lesser of two evils is still evil

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