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Thread: Richard Pygott

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    Default Richard Pygott

    Richard Pygott was Master of the Children in the household chapel of Cardinal Wolsey. During his tenure the ability of the choristers and the excellence of the music exceeded that of Henry VIII's Chapel Royal, as evidenced in letters from Henry's Dean to the Cardinal praising the choir and Pygott's teaching of them.

    There don't seem to many many recordings of music, and this is the only one I have. It contains his five part mass Missa Veni sancte spiritus, featuring some highly ornate parts it was certainly written for a a choir of great ability.

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    Looking on youtube I came across this marvellous work sung by the choir of Charterhouse School in 1966. Quid Petis O fili? (What ask you my child?):



    What I don't quite understand is how the following version (also good), and most of the other versions on yt are longer in duration, yet performed at a much faster tempo!

    "I expect I shall have to die beyond my means." — Oscar Wilde, on accepting a glass of champagne on his deathbed.

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    I stumbled on the Pygott and Mason recording a while ago and purchased it on a whim. It was one of my better whims.

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    Quote Originally Posted by eugeneonagain View Post
    Looking on youtube I came across this marvellous work sung by the choir of Charterhouse School in 1966. Quid Petis O fili? (What ask you my child?):



    What I don't quite understand is how the following version (also good), and most of the other versions on yt are longer in duration, yet performed at a much faster tempo!

    I have a recording of this on the Choir of Christ Church Oxford's Tudor Christmas album. It's just over 9 minutes and taken considerably slower than the 7 minute version by Trinity Cathedral, Cleveland above. I assume they are otherwise the same.

    The shorter Guildford Cathedral Choir recording is perhaps a truncated version for the concert they performed it at?


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