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Thread: Favourite Film Adapted from a Brit Novel

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    Senior Member Phil loves classical's Avatar
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    Default Favourite Film Adapted from a Brit Novel

    I hate pretty much everything by Jane Austen. But love a couple of Shakespeare adaptations, Zefferelli's Romeo and Juliet, and Polanski's Macbeth. I couldn't find a good film version of Wuthering Heights, but love the book. But the one that really gets me is the Remains of the Day. What's your favourite(s)?
    Last edited by Phil loves classical; Sep-06-2018 at 05:39.
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    Senior Member Art Rock's Avatar
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    The Lord of the Rings trilogy would be my first pick.
    #I♥CD

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    Senior Member MacLeod's Avatar
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    I like both LOTR and Remains of the Day. But it would be difficult to pick a favourite. Just look at how many there are listed here...

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Catego...ted_into_films

    (Who compiles this kind of stuff??)
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    From Russia with Love was my first thought.

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    Senior Member Templeton's Avatar
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    Joseph Losey's 'The Go-Between' based upon the novel by L.P. Hartley.
    Ken Russell's 'Women in Love' from D.H. Lawrence's novel.
    Ken Loach's 'Kes' based upon Barry Hines's 'A Kestrel for a Knave'.
    David Lean's 'Great Expectations' from Dickens's great novel.
    Roman Polanski's 'Tess' based upon Thomas Hardy's 'Tess of the d'Urbevilles'.
    Nicolas Roeg's 'Don't Look Now' based upon the short story by Daphne du Maurier.
    Sam Woods's 'Goodbye, Mr Chips' from the novella of the same name by James Hilton.
    William Wyler's ' The Collector', adapted from John Fowles's novel of the same name.


    I am sure that I have forgotten quite a few but these are ones that stand out immediately for me. In terms of choosing a favourite, I can't as they are all special in different ways. The top three, for me and not in any particular order, would be The Go-Between, Kes and The Collector.

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    Senior Member Templeton's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MacLeod View Post
    I like both LOTR and Remains of the Day. But it would be difficult to pick a favourite. Just look at how many there are listed here...

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Catego...ted_into_films

    (Who compiles this kind of stuff??)
    Great resource, thank you!

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    Senior Member MacLeod's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Templeton View Post
    Joseph Losey's 'The Go-Between' etc
    Joseph Losey's 'The Go-Between' based upon the novel by L.P. Hartley. - yes, excellent.
    Ken Russell's 'Women in Love' from D.H. Lawrence's novel. - um, haven't seen this in ages - male wrestling sticks in my head a bit!
    Ken Loach's 'Kes' based upon Barry Hines's 'A Kestrel for a Knave'. - saw it as a teen - hated it. I suspect I might like it better as an adult.
    David Lean's 'Great Expectations' from Dickens's great novel. - yes, excellent, though I think I prefer his 'Oliver Twist'.
    Roman Polanski's 'Tess' based upon Thomas Hardy's 'Tess of the d'Urbevilles'. - not seen this.
    Nicolas Roeg's 'Don't Look Now' based upon the short story by Daphne du Maurier. - scary, and utterly bizarre storyline.
    Sam Woods's 'Goodbye, Mr Chips' from the novella of the same name by James Hilton. - makes me blub (Donat - haven't seen the O'Toole).
    William Wyler's ' The Collector', adapted from John Fowles's novel of the same name - and again, yes, excellent

    Thanks for picking these out.

    I would add the adaptations of Forster's A Passage To India and Where Angels Fear To Tread.
    Last edited by MacLeod; Sep-08-2018 at 06:44.
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    Senior Member geralmar's Avatar
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    If Henry James is considered a British author (instead of American), then "The Innocents" (1961).



    "macabre love"?
    Last edited by geralmar; Sep-12-2018 at 06:48.

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    Senior Member jegreenwood's Avatar
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    Some that I don't think have been mentioned:

    Women in Love
    Tom Jones
    (Long ago I saw these two as a double bill.)

    A Passage to India (oops - I see it was mentioned)
    The Thirty-Nine Steps
    and
    Clueless
    Last edited by jegreenwood; Sep-20-2018 at 14:02.

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    Senior Member norman bates's Avatar
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    The turn of the screw > The innocents Jack Clayton, 1961
    (one of the best gothic/horror movies ever)

    Strange case of Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde - Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde - Rouben Mamoulian, 1931
    Alice's Adventures in wonderland> Alice in Wonderland, Disney, 1951
    Walkabout> Walkabout - Nicolas Roeg, 1971
    A clockwork Orange > A clockwork orange, Stanley Kubrick, 1971

    basically to me great adaptations of british novels can be done only in the first (or second? I've never got that) year of a decade.
    What time is the next swan?

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    Senior Member Vronsky's Avatar
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    A Clockwork Orange and Don't Look Now were mentioned, I like to add The Invisible Man (1933) directed by James Whale and Trainspotting (1996) directed by Danny Boyle. Both films have the same names as the novels.

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    Senior Member Totenfeier's Avatar
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    No love for the 1971 'Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory,' starring Gene Wilder, from Roald Dahl's 'Charlie and the Chocolate Factory?'

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